Art History

Courses

100 Level

  • ARTH 100 Survey of Western Art I Course is available via eLearning
     

    ARTH 100

    Survey of Western Art I
    Course is available via eLearning
    The first component of a two-part survey, this course introduces students to the historical and intellectual content of Western art. The course addresses painting, sculpture and architecture from the Paleolithic to the late Medieval period in Europe as presented in terms of history, style, meaning and social context. Prerequisite(s):
  • ARTH 110 Survey of Western Art II Course is available via eLearning
     

    ARTH 110

    Survey of Western Art II
    Course is available via eLearning
    The second component of a two-part survey, this course introduces students to the historical and intellectual content of Western art. The course addresses painting, sculpture and architecture from the Renaissance of the Early Modern period to the Contemporary in Europe and North America as presented in terms of history, style, meaning and social context. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 100.

200 Level

  • MUSM 201 Introduction to Museum Principles and Methods
     

    MUSM 201

    Introduction to Museum Principles and Methods
    This course introduces the student to the history, philosophy and role of museums and collecting in society. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110.
  • ARTH 204 17th-century Art
     

    ARTH 204

    17th-century Art
    Relationships between science, religion, politics and the arts found new visual expressions in European art and architecture of the 17th century. The course explores individual artists of Italy, Spain, France, Flanders and the Dutch Republic in view of their particular contributions to Baroque art and architectural cultures. The birth of the Baroque in Rome metamorphosized by the end of the century as a global language historically characterized as exuberant, tumultuous and even licentious. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 205 19th-century Art
     

    ARTH 205

    19th-century Art
    Neoclassicism, Romanticism and Realism mark several artistic responses to the transformation of societies by political revolutions in Europe and America at the end of the 18th century. In the wake of change, 19th-century art and architecture exhibit the influence of technology, literature and music while displaying new ways for artists to view society and their place within it. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 207 20th-century Art Course is available via eLearning
     

    ARTH 207

    20th-century Art
    Course is available via eLearning
    Driven by the concept of the avant-garde, art in the 20th century breaks radically from tradition into the myriad possibilities of art in a pluralistic era. This course follows these developments through studying the theories and styles that redefine the role of the artist and the very nature of art from the Modern to Post-Modern periods and beyond. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 209 Renaissance Art
     

    ARTH 209

    Renaissance Art
    Renaissance art and architecture remain extraordinary works, historically characterized as unique artistic achievements and the revival of an earlier, venerated age. Patronage, self-identity, artists’ biographies, techniques, materials and the myriad functions of art all shape our understanding of the Early Modern period. Commanding particular attention is the development of artistic practice and exchange between artists and architects—not only within a single master’s workshop, but also over time and across Europe. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 212 18th-century Art
     

    ARTH 212

    18th-century Art
    With emphasis on the art of France, Spain, England and Italy, this course educates the student on the art produced in 18th-century Europe. Distinction is made between the various stylistic periods that occurred during this century, namely the Rococo, Neoclassical and Romantic periods. Artwork is considered in the cultural and historical context. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 220 Survey of Asian Art
     

    ARTH 220

    Survey of Asian Art
    Students gain an understanding of the art produced by the diverse cultures of this region in this broad survey from prehistory to the modern period. This course focuses on the arts of India, China and Japan, with particular attention to technique, style, content and the role of the arts in Asian cultures. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 226 American Art
     

    ARTH 226

    American Art
    Focusing on painting and sculpture in the United States, this course offers a survey of American art from the colonial settlements to the early 20th century. The unique social, political and intellectual contexts of American art provide the basis for understanding the history and art of our own culture. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 240 Treasures of Provence
     

    ARTH 240

    Treasures of Provence
    The French region of Provence has inspired an array of artistic achievement from the monumental Roman aqueduct to the evocation of “The Starry Nights” by Van Gogh. Class discussion and site visits introduce students to the art collections and architectural monuments found throughout southern France. Students gain an understanding of the artistic traditions and the history of Provence. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 265 Survey of New Media Art
     

    ARTH 265

    Survey of New Media Art
    The breadth of new media in the digital and imaging arts and the recent history of artistic exploration into these media has become a significant component in the field of art history. Underscoring this survey is the concept that new media have forced art history into expanding the canon and criteria for examining art. In particular, this course surveys the evolution of traditional media. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 271 Art of China
     

    ARTH 271

    Art of China
    Beginning with the period of Neolithic ceramics, ritual bronze vessels, early pictorial art, Buddhist sculpture and architecture, and ink monochrome landscape painting, this survey of Chinese Art moves to the period of self-expressionistic paintings of the literati amateur tradition. The course provides an exploration of the content, style and role of the arts within the framework of Chinese culture and history. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 281 Ancient Art and Architecture
     

    ARTH 281

    Ancient Art and Architecture
    Examination of the formative and historical relationships between the art and culture of ancient Mediterranean civilizations reveals trends and traditions that establish a basis for modern civilization. Works of art and architecture are analyzed using a variety of archaeological and art historical approaches. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 282 Medieval Art and Architecture
     

    ARTH 282

    Medieval Art and Architecture
    The Middle Ages is a rich period encompassing Early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic art. This course addresses the art, architecture, sculpture, painting and "minor" arts such as manuscript illumination of the era in their political and religious contexts. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 283 Myth, Bible and Symbol in Art
     

    ARTH 283

    Myth, Bible and Symbol in Art
    The purpose of this course is to help students identify major mythological, biblical and symbolic themes in Western art. Students read excerpts from mythological and biblical literature and discuss their depiction in major works of art. Cultural symbols in art are also considered. This course is designed to further prepare students to recognize the use of symbolic language in works of art and to read and interpret the visual expressions of the cultural themes. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 285 Power and the Arts in Asia
     

    ARTH 285

    Power and the Arts in Asia
    The art and architecture of Asia exhibit the transformation of imagery by ideological and economic forces of power and authority. A series of historical case studies explore that expression in the arts, from the ideological underpinnings of ancient kings and emperors of various states to the impact of colonialism and reactions to colonial rule, and finally the dynamics of power and the arts in modern nation-states. To develop a variety of perspectives and explore methodological strategies, a rich selection of media are examined, including painting, design, public sculpture, architecture and the construction and transformation of the cities before, during and after colonial rule. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 286 Art of Japan
     

    ARTH 286

    Art of Japan
    Beginning with the Neolithic Jomon culture, this course provides an introduction to the visual language, artistic traditions and innovative practices of the cultures of Japan. Readings, lectures and discussions survey the rich variety of art forms including ceramics, bronze, wooden and stone sculpture, painting, decorative arts, architecture, and garden design. The course explores content, style and the role of the arts within the framework of Japanese culture and history. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 287 Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas
     

    ARTH 287

    Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas
    The art and architectural traditions of Africa, native North America, Oceania, pre-Columbian Mesoamerica and/or South America are introduced. Lectures primarily focus on content, context, style, technique, and the role of art and architecture in these cultures, with some discussion concerning the interaction of these traditions with Western art and architectural styles. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 288 The Art of Korea
     

    ARTH 288

    The Art of Korea
    This course surveys the painting, ceramics, sculpture and architecture of the Korean peninsula. With discussions of how various religious and philosophical ideas, native or foreign, influence the creation of Korean art and culture, the artwork is studied in context. Buddhism in Three Kingdom and Koryo period and Neo-Confucianism during Early Chosun dynasty and the Sil-hak movement (Korean Pragmatism) of the 18th and 19th centuries are emphasized in relationship with the creation of new art styles. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 289 Art and Architecture of India
     

    ARTH 289

    Art and Architecture of India
    Architecture, painting and sculpture of the Indian subcontinent are studied in context, with discussions of how Buddhist, Hindu, Jain and Muslim religions relate to the artistic production of the society. The purposes and functions of the various temples, sculptures and paintings are emphasized and students gain an overall awareness of the different uses of art in India as compared to the West. Literary texts provide a contextual background. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 295 Off-campus Special Topics in Art History
     

    ARTH 295

    Off-campus Special Topics in Art History
    The topic of this course varies from quarter to quarter. Each class focuses on a specific art form, artist’s practice, moment or developed theme and may highlight a unique geographic location or culture in the history, theory and criticism of art and design. Prerequisite(s): Vary according to topic.

300 Level

  • ARTH 300 Censored Art through 1945
     

    ARTH 300

    Censored Art through 1945
    Visual art continues to be an arena for social and political expression. Censorship is examined in relation to single objects, public sculpture as form and as community process; the idea of the monument; and issues such as civil rights, gay rights and challenges to the definition of art. This course focuses on case studies throughout history that have been censored, with an emphasis on European and American art production. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • MUSM 301 Museum Administration
     

    MUSM 301

    Museum Administration
    This survey of museum organization and administration includes governance, policies, ethics, marketing and public relations, and funding and financial structures. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • MUSM 302 Museum Curation and Collection Management
     

    MUSM 302

    Museum Curation and Collection Management
    This study of the principles and methods of acquisition examines documentation, maintenance and utilization of collections, and aspects of special exhibitions including registration, cataloging, collection policies, conservation and scholarship. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 303 Contemporary African Art
     

    ARTH 303

    Contemporary African Art
    Africa is central to any discussion of art in the 21st century. In fact, the images and dialogues that have emerged from African countries have been in many cases leading an expanding global discourse that the international art world now calls familiar. This course explores the reciprocity or symbiotic existences between cultures. The influence of African art on Western art and culture has been exhaustively published, but less has been understood about the reciprocal gesture of Western arts. This course guides the student through the theoretical and analytical landscapes of contemporary African art since 1980. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • MUSM 303 Museum Education
     

    MUSM 303

    Museum Education
    This study of the role of museums as educational institutions includes interpreting permanent collections, creating catalogs and other written and visual educational adjuncts, developing special exhibitions, lecturing, touring, managing volunteers, and developing community outreach programs. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARTH 326 Christians, Barbarians, Kings and Emperors
     

    ARTH 326

    Christians, Barbarians, Kings and Emperors
    A dynamic fusion of classical heritage, indigenous pagan cultures, consolidated Christian iconography and liturgical needs characterizes the period from the establishment of Constantinople as the New Rome in the East to the rise of pilgrimage and monasticism in western Europe. A unified political and cultural authority in the eastern Mediterranean beginning in the fourth century stands in marked contrast to the diverse local and regional practices extending throughout the territories formerly controlled by the Roman Empire. This course develops themes based on geography, cultural and artistic exchange; contrasts and comparisons in the art and architecture of Christianity; and the different and intertwined influences and impulses emerging in art and architecture after antiquity. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 329 Medieval Art and Architecture of Provence
     

    ARTH 329

    Medieval Art and Architecture of Provence
    Independent of France until the 15th century, Provence developed a distinctive style of art and architecture during the Middle Ages. By presenting a broad range of both religious and secular monuments, the course reveals the complex history of medieval art and architecture in the region. The physical artifacts provide ample opportunities to explore the unique development and cultural context of medieval arts in Provence. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 333 Egyptian Art and Archaeology
     

    ARTH 333

    Egyptian Art and Archaeology
    The ancient Egyptian civilization contributed staggeringly innovative works of art and architecture over more than three millennia, from the pre-dynastic cultures in the North and South through the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. Special attention is given to current archaeological discoveries in Egypt, the importance of hieroglyphs in the understanding of Egyptian art, and the phenomenon of Egyptianization throughout the history of Western art. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 338 Design and Decorative Arts in Medieval Europe
     

    ARTH 338

    Design and Decorative Arts in Medieval Europe
    Art of the Middle Ages came in many different forms. The focus of this course is on the decorative and other minor arts, which include textiles, fashion, metalwork, lapidary carving, jewelry and small-scale sculpture. Discussions of their function in a variety of contexts throughout the Middle Ages are the primary concentrations. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 340 Art Since 1945 Course is available via eLearning
     

    ARTH 340

    Art Since 1945
    Course is available via eLearning
    The international movement of artists at mid-century generated radical shifts in artistic practice. During the post-war period, theories crossed disciplines and informed the making and criticism of art. This course uncovers the significant characteristics of the recent past and present, and explores the theory, criticism and history that inform it. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 342 Art and Spirituality
     

    ARTH 342

    Art and Spirituality
    The late 19th century and early 20th century witnessed the development of consciously abstracted and deliberately spiritual approaches to painting and sculpture in Europe. The most important styles, groups and artists of this trend include Symbolism, the Nabis, Der Blaue Reiter and Suprematism. Students examine key figures and explore their art within its historical context. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 343 Installation and Environmental Art
     

    ARTH 343

    Installation and Environmental Art
    New practices in installation and environmental art often hybridize art with life, technology, science, research, perception, philosophy and ethics. Such integrative artwork may transform our perception of the immanent world. Students analyze and interpret such work in light of their meaning in social, cultural and political frames of reference. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 347 Great Masters’ Materials and Techniques
     

    ARTH 347

    Great Masters’ Materials and Techniques
    How and with what tools have great artists created their masterpieces? This course delves below the surface to explore the physical character of paintings, manuscripts and stained glass windows by northern and southern European artists from 1100 to 1600. Antique treatises and recipe books regarding artists' materials and techniques are studied. Recent scientific examinations of artworks and conservation issues are also considered in light of emerging studies in this field. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 348 British Portraiture
     

    ARTH 348

    British Portraiture
    Using the university resource of the Earle W. Newton Collection of British and American Arts, British portraiture from the Renaissance to the early 20th century is examined. Course discussions focus on content, style and technique of work that is directly observable in the collection and explores the context and role of portraiture in British society. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 350 Women in Art Course is available via eLearning
     

    ARTH 350

    Women in Art
    Course is available via eLearning
    Art historical discourse has traditionally neglected women artists. Surveying women's contributions to artistic production from antiquity through postmodernism redresses this. Students examine the social constructs that informed these exclusions, read scholarship addressing gender issues and discuss the revision of art history in the light of recent scholarship. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 351 Native American Art of Northern and Eastern North America
     

    ARTH 351

    Native American Art of Northern and Eastern North America
    The culture areas of the northern and eastern North American continent are examined, with discussion focused primarily on content, context, style, technique and the role of art in these diverse cultures. Regions studied include the prehistoric Eastern Woodlands, historic Southeast, Northeast, Sub-Arctic, Arctic and Northwest Coast. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 356 Digital Art and Culture
     

    ARTH 356

    Digital Art and Culture
    The transformative impact of digital art, design, ideas and technology upon contemporary culture dominates human experience on a global scale. This seminar explores some of the effects of digital art and culture upon aesthetic experience, which often challenge prevailing modern concepts of cultural production and consumption. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 357 Greek Art and Archaeology
     

    ARTH 357

    Greek Art and Archaeology
    Students explore the contributions made by Ancient Greece to world art and architecture in stylistic, social and historical context, together with the archaeological achievements made in uncovering the Greek past. Special attention is given to Greece’s foundational position for Western culture and civilization. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 358 Roman Art and Archaeology
     

    ARTH 358

    Roman Art and Archaeology
    Students examine the monuments and achievements of Ancient Rome through architecture, sculpture and painting from the birth of the Republic to Constantine. Special attention is given to the influence of Rome as the transmitter of Western culture through to modern times. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 361 Native American Art of Western and Southwestern North America
     

    ARTH 361

    Native American Art of Western and Southwestern North America
    The culture areas of the western and southwestern North American continent are examined, with discussion focused primarily on content, context, style, technique and the role of art in these diverse cultures. Regions studied in this course include The Plateau, The Great Plains, The Great Basin, California and The American Southwest. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 365 World Rock Art
     

    ARTH 365

    World Rock Art
    Rock paintings or rock carvings from around the world are a record of people connecting meaning and place. Discussions focus on site studies from Paleolithic Europe, Neolithic Africa, North America and Australia, as well as a consideration of contemporary methodologies and issues in the field, with particular emphasis on site preservation and management. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 366 British Literary Art of the 19th Century
     

    ARTH 366

    British Literary Art of the 19th Century
    Literature of the 19th century had a strong influence on British painting. This course examines the visual and verbal dialogue between these two art forms through the reading of poetry, novels and other prose as a means to comprehend their application in the visual art world of 19th-century Britain. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 367 18th-century English Art and Design
     

    ARTH 367

    18th-century English Art and Design
    Painting, sculpture, design, landscape and architecture are examined within the context of an English Georgian society that variously placed an emphasis on polite society, class distinction, the study of classical art and culture, nature, commerce and the romantic. Individual work is studied within the larger context of the patron’s and maker’s physical, social and psychological milieus. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 368 British Modernism
     

    ARTH 368

    British Modernism
    British art in the early 20th century was predicated upon an ambivalent relationship with modernism. English artistic tradition, based upon romantic individualism, empiricism, and the importance of literary and allegorical subject matter, was at odds with European modernism. This created a division between conservative British figurative artists and those engaged with the socio-political aspects of Continental modernism. This course also traces the genealogy of British modernism thematically. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 369 Russian Modernism
     

    ARTH 369

    Russian Modernism
    Modern Russian art is the product of the same discourses that defined all Western modernist movements. Through the study of Russian architecture, film, painting, sculpture and theatrical settings, this course addresses fundamental issues that are raised in an examination of modernism in any national context. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 370 French Modernism
     

    ARTH 370

    French Modernism
    During the 19th century, Paris was the center for artistic change in Europe. This course explores the work and theories of major French painters, sculptors and architects, with special consideration given to history and the emerging technologies. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 372 French Impressionism
     

    ARTH 372

    French Impressionism
    In the late 19th century, the concept of the avant-garde was developed by artists working on the problems of painting the immediate sensations of light. The issues of what a painting was and the role of the artist in society are discussed. The influence of impressionism on the concept of modernism and the individual personalities are significant aspects of the dialogue. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123, ARTH 110, and ARTH 205 or ARTH 207.
  • ARTH 374 African Art: Beyond the Object
     

    ARTH 374

    African Art: Beyond the Object
    The rich and exotic traditional arts and cultural traditions of Africa, outside of Euro-American influence, are discussed in this course. Students focus on developing an appreciation of other cultures and exploring their limitless potential to work with Western cultures in the spirit of reciprocity. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 375 Art and Architecture of 16th-century Italy
     

    ARTH 375

    Art and Architecture of 16th-century Italy
    Developments in artistic theory and design such as the contradictions in Michelangelo's work-which enlighten and explain the dramatic intensity and stylistic changes from the grandeur of the High Renaissance to the complexities of the Mannerists-are the focus of this course. Works of principal painters and sculptors from the major art-producing cities of the period are studied. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 376 Downtown in the Eighties: Painting, Punk and Photography in New York
     

    ARTH 376

    Downtown in the Eighties: Painting, Punk and Photography in New York
    The 1980s in New York were a time of tremendous change and experimentation in the art world. From the influence of Punk to Graffiti art, Appropriation to Neo-Expressionism, the downtown art scene redefined the cultural landscape of New York. This course undertakes an in-depth study of this particular period, focusing on the use of the photograph across diverse art media and practices. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 377 Photography and Modernity
     

    ARTH 377

    Photography and Modernity
    From its invention in 1839 through the 20th century, photography has been a key factor in shaping and defining modernity. Photography and Modernity explores such topics as the invention of the medium and technical innovations, commercial photography, the spread of photography across the globe, photojournalism, movements of art photography, including pictorialism and surrealism, and social documentary. Photographs are studied as both art objects and historical artifacts. Recurring issues include the debates between art photography and documentary photography, government and private patronage, individual and collective endeavors, original and published prints and urban and landscape views. Students read key texts by foundational writers as well as theoretical essays by contemporary scholars. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 380 Northern Renaissance Art
     

    ARTH 380

    Northern Renaissance Art
    Covering the great artistic achievements and the diverse social conditions north of the Alps from approximately 1350–1575, this course explores the diverse and unified art and architecture produced in northern Europe during the period. The role that the church and nobility played in the invention and development of oil painting is studied, as well as the role prints played in creating the unprecedented spread of information, leading to an awareness of classicism and playing a significant role in the Reformation. The technical development of prints and the importance of religious sculpture also are critically analyzed. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARTH course.
  • ARTH 381 Italian Renaissance Art
     

    ARTH 381

    Italian Renaissance Art
    This course gives special emphasis to the form and function of Italian art and architecture from the early 14th to the middle of the 16th century, the context of these works, and the lives of the artists and architects who produced them. Questions of patronage and the influence of humanism through literature are examined. Differences in regional style are critically analyzed. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 383 Ancient Mesoamerican Art and Architecture
     

    ARTH 383

    Ancient Mesoamerican Art and Architecture
    The visual arts and architecture of the indigenous cultures of ancient Mexico and northern Central America from 1500 BCE–1550 CE are explored in this course. Architectural monuments, sculpture, fresco and manuscript painting, lapidary arts, featherwork, textiles, ceramics, and metalwork of the Olmec, Teotihuacano, Maya and Mexica-Aztec, among other cultures, are discussed within their socio-political and ritual contexts and in terms of their expressive content: subject matter, form, materials and techniques. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 385 Ancient Central Andean Art and Architecture
     

    ARTH 385

    Ancient Central Andean Art and Architecture
    The visual arts and architecture of the indigenous cultures of primarily Peru and Bolivia are explored prior to 1550 CE. Architecture, sculpture, wall painting, lapidary arts, featherwork, textiles, ceramics and metalwork of the Chavín, Paracas, Nasca, Moche, Chimú and Inka cultures are discussed within their socio-political and ritual contexts and in terms of their expressive content: subject matter, form, materials and techniques. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 395 Advanced Special Topics in Art History
     

    ARTH 395

    Advanced Special Topics in Art History
    The topic of this course varies from quarter to quarter. Each class focuses on a specific art form, artist’s practice, moment or a developed theme and may highlight a unique geographic location or culture in the history, theory and criticism of art and design. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 396 Art and Architectural Treasures of the Vatican
     

    ARTH 396

    Art and Architectural Treasures of the Vatican
    The legacy of the Vatican site is investigated from the ancient Roman era into our contemporary day. General areas of focus include archeological evidence and the art and architectural development of the site. The relationships between artists, the papacy and the people are reconstructed as well as the role and history of the museum collection. Contemporary issues involving the site, its art and its relationship to the world are exposed to students who explore a variety of scholarly approaches associated with the challenges of studying an ancient site over time. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course.

400 Level

  • ARTH 400 Methods of Art History
     

    ARTH 400

    Methods of Art History
    This course introduces students majoring in art history to the multiplicity of theoretical frameworks and methodologies that have defined the history of art as a discipline. The course explores art history’s evolution as a field of study, seeking to understand the ways in which art historians have established the autonomy of their subject. The course addresses the many intersections with other disciplines and bodies of knowledge. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARTH course, permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 405 Visual Constructs: Perspective, Representation and Cognitive Mapping
     

    ARTH 405

    Visual Constructs: Perspective, Representation and Cognitive Mapping
    Visuality in the representation and experience of space is culturally determined. In Western art since the 15th century, the constructs depend on the history and theory of perspective and projection drawing. Optical theories and practices developed during the Early Modern period explain the geometric properties of Euclidean space and depend upon seeing, knowing and creating within scalable space. This course explores the mechanisms of constructing vision by the conventions of linear and non-linear perspective, orthographic and projection drawing, distorted representations, movement, and the responses to form and environment. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 406 Media and Modernity
     

    ARTH 406

    Media and Modernity
    This course offers students interested in media technologies the opportunity to engage directly with the art historical and theoretical debates prompted by those technologies—debates that recur throughout the 20th century and continue unabated into the present day. Through intensive readings, discussion and writing, students explore the rise and growth of the mass media—from the gramophone to Internet radio, photography to Adobe Photoshop, the Lumières to 3-D digital cinema—in light of the larger context of a rapidly modernizing world. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 408 Museum Culture
     

    ARTH 408

    Museum Culture
    The structure of the art museum is discussed, along with museum theory and applied museology. This course provides a historical overview of the development, nature, evolution, form, function, purpose and meaning of the art museum in Europe, North America and in the developing world through course readings, class discussions and review of case studies of major museums. This undergraduate seminar explores these themes and the cultural and interpretative contexts of the works of art. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 415 Medieval Manuscripts
     

    ARTH 415

    Medieval Manuscripts
    The medieval manuscript provided artists with the most important venue for painting for more than 1200 years. Students learn how and why manuscripts were made by exploring production practices and patronage. The socio-historical context under which these fine works were created is a significant component of this course. This undergraduate seminar explores these themes and the cultural and interpretative contexts of the works of art. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 417 Problems in Art History: A Crisis in Art Criticism?
     

    ARTH 417

    Problems in Art History: A Crisis in Art Criticism?
    Prominent art writers have proclaimed a "crisis in art criticism." This course examines this "crisis," if it indeed exists, through reading critics' own arguments on the state of the field; through historical writings; through careful analysis of recent art criticism; and through an examination of the theoretical issues that preoccupy today's contemporary artists and, thus, their critics. Students explore the key historical figures who shaped the discipline of art criticism since the late 19th century in order to understand how the discourse of criticism has influenced, and been influenced by, changes in the art world. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 420 Visual Culture
     

    ARTH 420

    Visual Culture
    Students learn to use the language of visual culture with a particular focus on the symbols, strategies and messages employed. Incorporating the methods of art analysis, the course introduces students to different forms of visual culture (television, advertising, fashion, gaming, architecture and the media), while comparing and contrasting these in a philosophical and historical setting. This undergraduate seminar explores these themes and the cultural and interpretative contexts of the works of art. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 421 Rome in the Middle Ages
     

    ARTH 421

    Rome in the Middle Ages
    Rome in the Middle Ages is the story of a city re-inventing itself, evolving from the capital of an empire to the headquarters of the Catholic Church in the West. This course focuses on the evolution of art and architecture in medieval Rome, and how the popes employed this work to convey both political and religious messages glorifying the papacy, the church and the city of Rome. Students also explore the increasing importance of Rome as a spiritual center and pilgrimage destination and the city's impact on Western Europe. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 440 Problems in Renaissance Art: Mannerism
     

    ARTH 440

    Problems in Renaissance Art: Mannerism
    The art historical term "Mannerism" was coined by scholars centuries after the movement had ended. Art and artists considered are those from the 16th century in Italy who provided an alternative style to what is most often called the High Renaissance practiced by Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael. The term and the movement have been questioned repeatedly over the past five decades, especially concerning the movement's dates, influences, development and practitioners. After presenting a foundation for the etymology of Mannerism/maniera, this course includes intense reading, discussion and analysis of the scholarship since the International Conference on the style in question (1963).This undergraduate seminar explores these themes and the cultural and interpretative contexts of the works of art. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 447 The Hybrid City: Ancient and Early Modern Rome
     

    ARTH 447

    The Hybrid City: Ancient and Early Modern Rome
    The distinctive urban fabric of Rome captures the eye of the artist and architect by the dynamic presence of the ancient city as a continuous actor within the contemporary city. This seminar pays particular attention to visual representations of the city and her monuments to uncover the union of the ancient and modern. The documents of the 15th and 16th centuries fuse the diachronic artifacts of history into a synchronic view of ancient and contemporary Rome. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 450 Caravaggio
     

    ARTH 450

    Caravaggio
    The developments in the art of Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio and his characteristic style of painting have continued to inspire artists and scholars for the past four centuries. His mastery of different genre and narratives formulated a Baroque language that continues to influence "Caravaggio studies." From his contemporary audience to our own day, the critical responses and historiography of those critiques construct the investigation into the life and work of Caravaggio. A variety of methodologies are considered to better understand this innovator and instigator of the Baroque style and the consequence of his artistic practice and conventions on generations of painters. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 451 Baroque Spectacle: The Art and Architecture of Bernini
     

    ARTH 451

    Baroque Spectacle: The Art and Architecture of Bernini
    Gian Lorenzo Bernini's wide-ranging artistic practice in early modern Rome emerges as a thoroughly modern practice from a theoretical analysis. Special attention is given to the dissolution of the boundary between art and life in Bernini's work, and how Bernini's own artistic theory shaped his practice and our understanding of Baroque art in general. This seminar considers Bernini's 17th-century context and artistic production by using a variety of art historical methodologies. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 458 Caricature and Satire in 18th-century British Culture
     

    ARTH 458

    Caricature and Satire in 18th-century British Culture
    William Hogarth was the foremost visual satirist of 18th-century Great Britain. His oeuvre's commentary on the social, political and intellectual issues of 1720s-1760s Great Britain and (to a lesser extent) his influence on contemporaneous and subsequent artists are analyzed through readings, discussions, research and writings. This undergraduate seminar explores these themes and the cultural and interpretative contexts of the works of art. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 459 The Art of the Ruin
     

    ARTH 459

    The Art of the Ruin
    From the early modern period on, artists have held a special fascination for ancient buildings left half standing, sculptures in fragments and what profound lessons such objects of melancholic beauty hold. Looking at, thinking about and making art in response to the buildings and monuments humanity has made—but time has unmade—has long been an especially poignant exercise for artists, perpetually engaged as they are in processes of making and unmaking. Using the interest in Roman ruins as a starting point, this class traces the art resulting from human interest in the wrecked remains of civilizations past, the specialized visual language of the art of the ruin, and the many ways in which artists and thinkers described and determined the ruin's cultural significance. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 463 Image, Text, Print
     

    ARTH 463

    Image, Text, Print
    The print medium was the earliest form of rapidly disseminated mass-communication to combine image and text. It therefore predicted contemporary visual mass media. Easily circulated, prints sparked a revolution: Artists and consumers rethought how imagery could impact consciousness. This course examines works by major print artists, a variety of audiences for prints, the broadening of content and format, and developments in print technology. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 471 The Madness of Photography
     

    ARTH 471

    The Madness of Photography
    In Camera Lucida, Roland Barthes defines the photograph as "a new form of hallucination: false on the level of perception, true on the level of time…a mad image: chafed by reality." For Barthes, photography's inherent madness makes it a bizarre medium, tamed by a society that either reifies it into art or renders it banal beyond distinction with regard to the onslaught of images characteristic of modern life. The madness of photography is both poetically and ontologically central to the medium and is discernible from its origins. New perspectives on the many implications of madness in photography's history, theory and practice are explored by turning attention to the irrationality at the center of the seemingly objective process. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 476 Documentary Photography and the Portrait 1945–Present
     

    ARTH 476

    Documentary Photography and the Portrait 1945–Present
    Covering the history of documentary photography from circa 1945 to the present, students examine major photographic movements, styles, critics and theoretical perspectives. The focus is on the rich and varied critical and theoretical discourse circulating between photographs, or images, using photography and the texts that helped frame the most significant contributions to contemporary photography. This undergraduate seminar explores these themes and the cultural and interpretative contexts of the works of art. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 477 Critical and Theoretical Approaches to Photography Since 1945
     

    ARTH 477

    Critical and Theoretical Approaches to Photography Since 1945
    Addressing the history of photography from circa 1945 to the present, this course examines major photographic movements, styles, critics and theoretical perspectives. The course focuses on the rich and varied critical and theoretical discourse circulating between photographs, or images using photography, and the texts that helped frame the most significant contributions to contemporary photography. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 479 Undergraduate Internship
     

    ARTH 479

    Undergraduate Internship
    Internships offer students valuable opportunities to work in a professional environment and gain firsthand experience to help them prepare for careers. In an approved internship setting, a student typically spends one quarter working with an on-site professional supervisor and a faculty internship supervisor to achieve specific goals and objectives related to the program of study. Prerequisite(s): 90 credit hours, 3.0 cumulative GPA.
  • MUSM 479 Museum Internship
     

    MUSM 479

    Museum Internship
    Internships offer students valuable opportunities to work in a professional environment and gain firsthand experience to help them prepare for careers. In an approved internship setting, a student typically spends one quarter working with an on-site professional supervisor and a faculty internship supervisor to achieve specific goals and objectives related to the program of study. Prerequisite(s): 60 credit hours, 2.5 overall GPA.
  • ARTH 480 After Postmodernism
     

    ARTH 480

    After Postmodernism
    Contemporary art history today faces multiple challenges from aesthetics, visual culture, media theory and the blurring line between "high" and "low" art. Recent research practices call for the reevaluation of the foundations of art history. Discussion of the methodological challenges after postmodernism is a major component of this course. This undergraduate seminar explores these themes and the cultural and interpretative contexts of the works of art. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 481 Gender and the Body
     

    ARTH 481

    Gender and the Body
    The so-called Second and Third Waves of Feminism, from 1970 to the present, are the focus of this course. The course takes into account the immediate influences from the middle decades of the 20th century, in particular the impact of the Women's Liberation Movement and the Stonewall riots. Feminism has been strongly influential in all areas of contemporary art and therefore this course covers topics such as, but not limited to: the history of "feminisms," Feminism as theoretical framework, the history of women as artists, the relationship of Feminism to Civil Rights and to Queer Theory, Cyberfeminism, and the validity of the term "post-feminism." Students enhance their analytical thinking and interpretative skills by engaging in close readings, small group discussions, an independent research assignment and collaborative visual presentations. This undergraduate seminar explores these themes and the cultural and interpretative contexts of the works of art. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 482 Weimar Photography, Art and Design
     

    ARTH 482

    Weimar Photography, Art and Design
    The interwar period between the World Wars is key to any understanding of the history of art for the significant development of the international avant-garde. Particularly in Germany, the establishment of the Weimar Republic in 1918 created a moment that was highly experimental, performative, political and contingent upon the rapidly changing social and economic climate. The course fosters an in-depth understanding of the political scene. It considers the effects of war upon culture and confronts this era in relation to the history of international and German politics, economics, feminism, graphic design, photography, art and cinema. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 491 Topics in New Media Art
     

    ARTH 491

    Topics in New Media Art
    This course focuses on in-depth theoretical and critical investigation of a particular topic within the new media arts. The topic varies from quarter to quarter with the intention to provide students the opportunity to refine their expertise in a specific field of inquiry. This undergraduate seminar explores these themes and the cultural and interpretative contexts of the works of art. Prerequisite(s): Varies according to topic.
  • ARTH 493 Visiting Scholar/Curator
     

    ARTH 493

    Visiting Scholar/Curator
    Taught by both a visiting scholar/curator and a SCAD faculty member, this seminar is organized around the expertise of the visiting scholar/curator. Students read and discuss the visiting scholar/curator's work and other work of comparable scope, scale or historical context. Through discussions, workshops, criticism and research projects, students work with the visiting scholar/curator to expand their critical understanding and the historical and cultural context of research projects or exhibitions. Prerequisite(s): Any 300-level ARLH or ARTH course.
  • ARTH 496 Special Topics in Art History
     

    ARTH 496

    Special Topics in Art History
    Each quarter focuses on various issues in the art history field, giving students an opportunity to pursue individual projects related to the subject of the course. This undergraduate seminar explores these themes and the cultural and interpretative contexts of the works of art. Prerequisite(s): Vary according to topic.
  • ARTH 499 Art History B.F.A. Thesis
     

    ARTH 499

    Art History B.F.A. Thesis
    This course provides an opportunity for students to demonstrate sound scholarly methodology and critical thinking skills as they select a topic, research it and write an advanced research paper under the supervision of a faculty committee. The thesis topic must be approved at least one quarter in advance by a faculty adviser. The course is designed for senior art history majors. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 400, permission of the department chair.

700 Level

  • ARTH 700 Historiography of Art History
     

    ARTH 700

    Historiography of Art History
    Historiography is a thorough introduction to the principle developments and writings in the field of art history, with an emphasis on developments from the 18th century onward. Readings for class meetings demonstrate various approaches to and methodologies in art history. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 701 Contemporary Art Course is available via eLearning
     

    ARTH 701

    Contemporary Art
    Course is available via eLearning
    In response to the complexity of the centers and the peripheries of the art world, students discuss a spectrum of different theoretical discourses, art historical methodologies and art practices of the recent decades. An in-depth analysis of central art works and their relation to crucial issues of cultural surroundings are the focus of each class discussion. Prerequisite(s):
  • ARTH 702 Art Criticism Course is available via eLearning
     

    ARTH 702

    Art Criticism
    Course is available via eLearning
    The structure of this course combines analysis of texts by major art critics and the development of critical writing skills. Each class discussion focuses on key terms, analytical lenses and the development of pertinent frameworks for the interpretation of contemporary art and artistic practice in art criticism. Student presentations and writing assignments help to develop students' critical thinking as they analyze the art criticism of preeminent practitioners in leading scholarly journals. Prerequisite(s):
  • ARTH 703 Modern and Contemporary Critical Theory
     

    ARTH 703

    Modern and Contemporary Critical Theory
    The importance of critical theory and how it has shaped the practices of both artists and art historians in recent times is the focus of this course. Various theoretical models permit a reconsideration of the position of art and its histories in the context of a range of socio-cultural issues. The course explores the impact of critical theory upon the practices of both making and writing about art. Prerequisite(s):
  • ARTH 705 Visual Constructs: Issues in Perspective, Representation and Cognitive Mapping
     

    ARTH 705

    Visual Constructs: Issues in Perspective, Representation and Cognitive Mapping
    Optical theories and practices developed during the Early Modern period depend upon the geometric properties of Euclidean space and construct experience by seeing, knowing and creating within scalable space. This course explores the mechanisms of constructing vision by the conventions of linear and non-linear perspective, orthographic and projection drawing, distorted representations, movement, and the phenomenological responses to form and space. The graduate critique leads to advanced research and a focused investigation exploring the theme within the history, theory and criticism of art and design. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 713 The Pre-Raphaelite Movement
     

    ARTH 713

    The Pre-Raphaelite Movement
    The Pre-Raphaelite movement is explored through the paintings, prints and design media made by artists associated with the movement. The course explores the debates and practices addressing craft and mass production as well as the diffusion and reform of art and architecture from Europe to America. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 716 Pyramids
     

    ARTH 716

    Pyramids
    Ancient Egypt and its pyramids have represented the apex in world architectural achievement since antiquity. This course examines the chronological development of the pyramid form, its functional synthesis in ancient Egyptian culture and its transmission as an emblem for Egyptianization through time. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 721 Rome in the Middle Ages: Issues in Medieval Art
     

    ARTH 721

    Rome in the Middle Ages: Issues in Medieval Art
    Rome in the Middle Ages is the story of a city re-inventing itself, evolving from the capital of an empire to the headquarters of the Catholic Church in the West. This course focuses on the evolution of art and architecture of medieval Rome and how the popes employed these works to convey both political and religious messages glorifying the papacy, the Church and the city of Rome. Students also explore the increasing importance of Rome as a spiritual center and pilgrimage destination and the city’s impact on western Europe. The graduate critique leads to advanced research and a focused investigation exploring the theme within the history, theory and criticism of art and design. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 723 Media and Modernity: Issues in Modern Art
     

    ARTH 723

    Media and Modernity: Issues in Modern Art
    Students interested in media technologies are given the opportunity to engage directly with the art historical and theoretical debates prompted by those technologies-debates that have recurred throughout the 20th century and continue unabated into the present day. The course explores the rise and growth of mass media-from the gramophone to Internet radio, photography to Adobe Photoshop, Lumières to 3-D digital cinema-in light of the larger context of a rapidly modernizing world. The graduate critique leads to advanced research and a focused investigation exploring the theme within the history, theory and criticism of art and design. Prerequisite(s):
  • ARTH 726 Medieval Manuscripts: Issues in Medieval Art
     

    ARTH 726

    Medieval Manuscripts: Issues in Medieval Art
    The medieval manuscript provided artists with the most important venue for painting for more than 1200 years. Students learn how and why manuscripts were made by exploring production practices and patronage. The socio-historical context under which these fine works were created is a significant component of this course. The graduate critique leads to advanced research and a focused investigation exploring the theme within the history, theory and criticism of art and design. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 729 Virtuality in the Public Sphere
     

    ARTH 729

    Virtuality in the Public Sphere
    Whether called Web 2.0, cloud computing, the noosphere, cyberdemocracy or neo-Maoism, the polemics surrounding the theories of the public sphere and virtuality hold tremendous cultural interest. This course explores the ethical role of artists and designers as cultural producers and public intellectuals. The goal of this course is the dialectical analysis and interpretation of the "public sphere" as described by leading theorists and practitioners. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 733 Uncovering Ancient Greece: Issues in Art and Archaeology
     

    ARTH 733

    Uncovering Ancient Greece: Issues in Art and Archaeology
    Abstract figural representations, classical models, and later baroque sculptures and architectural complexes exemplify the range of diverse expressions and achievements of Ancient Greece. This course addresses the art and architecture in stylistic, social and historical context, together with the archaeological achievements made in uncovering the Greek past. Special attention is given to Greece's foundational position for Western culture and civilization. The graduate critique leads to advanced research and a focused investigation exploring the themes within the history, theory and criticism of art and design. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 747 The Hybrid City: Issues in Ancient and Early Modern Rome
     

    ARTH 747

    The Hybrid City: Issues in Ancient and Early Modern Rome
    The distinctive urban fabric of Rome captures the eye of the artist and architect due to the dynamic presence of the ancient city as a continuous actor within the contemporary city. This seminar pays particular attention to visual representations of the city and its monuments to uncover the union of the ancient and modern. The documents of the 15th and 16th centuries fuse the diachronic artifacts of history into a synchronic view of ancient and contemporary Rome. The graduate critique leads to advanced research and a focused investigation exploring the theme within the history, theory and criticism of art and design. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 750 Roman Art and Archaeology
     

    ARTH 750

    Roman Art and Archaeology
    Masterpieces of ancient Roman art, commissioned by the elite, traditionally attract focused study. Yet, recent research reveals a more complex societal dynamic recorded by art commissioned by others within the Roman world. In light of recent archaeological discovery and research, this course challenges traditional interpretations of Classical Roman art while considering the historical readings of the art works, including painting, sculpture, architecture and material culture. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • MUSM 754 Museum Curation and Collections
     

    MUSM 754

    Museum Curation and Collections
    This course examines the history and theory of the role of the curator in a museological context. Elements of daily organization and maintenance of the collections are discussed. Students are exposed to the creativity involved in long-term collection development and its presentation through exhibitions. Prerequisite(s):
  • ARTH 757 Media Art
     

    ARTH 757

    Media Art
    The breadth of new media in the digital and imaging arts and the recent history of artistic exploration into these media make it essential to consider the evolution of these art forms from traditional media. Underscoring the exploration is the conception that new media has forced art history into expanding the canon and the traditional criteria for examining art. Prerequisite(s):
  • ARTH 758 Caricature and Satire in 18th-century British Culture: Issues in Modern Art
     

    ARTH 758

    Caricature and Satire in 18th-century British Culture: Issues in Modern Art
    William Hogarth was the foremost visual satirist of 18th-century Great Britain. His oeuvre’s commentary on the social, political and intellectual issues of 1720s-1760s Great Britain and (to a lesser extent) his influence on contemporaneous and subsequent artists are analyzed through readings, discussions, research and writings. The graduate critique leads to advanced research and a focused investigation exploring the theme within the history, theory and criticism of art and design. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 759 The Art of the Ruin: Issues in Representation
     

    ARTH 759

    The Art of the Ruin: Issues in Representation
    From the early modern period on, artists have held a special fascination for buildings left half standing, sculptures in fragments and what profound lessons such objects of melancholic beauty hold. This course traces the art resulting from human interest in the wrecked remains of civilizations past, the specialized visual language of the art of the ruin, and the many ways in which artists and thinkers described and determined the ruin's cultural significance. The graduate critique leads to advanced research and a focused investigation exploring the theme within the history, theory and criticism of art and design. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 761 Landscapes and Photography
     

    ARTH 761

    Landscapes and Photography
    How do we define landscape? How are photographs uniquely suited to capture the grace, horror and beauty of the places in which we live, work and play? This course examines photographic landscapes from the everyday to the extraordinary, from the serene to the surreal. Theoretical readings situate landscape photography within a larger framework of photographic history and criticism and explore various representations of landscape throughout the history of photography from 1839 until the present, with a special focus on American practitioners and places. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 763 Image, Text, Print: Issues in Representation
     

    ARTH 763

    Image, Text, Print: Issues in Representation
    The print medium was the earliest form of rapidly disseminated mass-communication to combine image and text. It therefore predicated contemporary visual mass media such as newspapers, television and the Internet. Easily circulated, prints sparked a revolution: artists and consumers re-thought how imagery could impact consciousness. This course explores the effects of this paradigm shift while examining works by major print artists, a variety of audiences for prints, the broadening of content and format, and developments in print technology. The graduate critique leads to advanced research and a focused investigation exploring the theme within the history, theory and criticism of art and design. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 777 Critical and Theoretical Approaches to Photography since 1945: Issues in Contemporary Art
     

    ARTH 777

    Critical and Theoretical Approaches to Photography since 1945: Issues in Contemporary Art
    Addressing the history of photography from circa 1945 to the present, this course examines major photographic movements, styles, critics and theoretical perspectives. The focus is on the rich and varied critical and theoretical discourse circulating between photographs, or images, using photography and the texts that framed significant contributions to contemporary photography. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 779F Graduate Field Internship
     

    ARTH 779F

    Graduate Field Internship
    Students in this course undertake a field assignment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good academic standing.
  • ARTH 779T Graduate Teaching Internship
     

    ARTH 779T

    Graduate Teaching Internship
    Students in this course undertake a teaching assignment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good academic standing.
  • ARTH 786 Visual Culture
     

    ARTH 786

    Visual Culture
    The practice of examining contemporary visual culture produces cultural, social and political meaning. A language of visual culture builds from sets of symbols, strategies and messages. By looking at a range of visual material, from fine art to popular culture, this course explores representations and their relationships to ideological and institutional structures. Theories of media and mediation, text and image, and power and desire shape the investigation. This course introduces students to different forms of visual culture while comparing and contrasting these within a philosophical and historical setting. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 787 Gender and the Body: Issues in Contemporary Art
     

    ARTH 787

    Gender and the Body: Issues in Contemporary Art
    The history of feminist art is rich and varied. The second and third waves, from 1970 to the present, are the focus of this course. It also takes into account the immediate influences from the middle decades of the 20th century, in particular the impact of the Women's Liberation Movement and Stonewall. Feminism has been strongly influential on all areas of contemporary art, which is also a subject of discussion throughout the course. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 788 Art History M.A. Thesis
     

    ARTH 788

    Art History M.A. Thesis
    Students enrolled in the art history M.A. program are required to complete a thesis demonstrating knowledge of the methods and theories in the discipline. Students must have topic approval from a faculty adviser and work under the close supervision of a faculty committee. Prerequisite(s): Completion of the review for candidacy.
  • ARTH 793 Visiting Scholar/Curator: Issues in Curatorial Studies
     

    ARTH 793

    Visiting Scholar/Curator: Issues in Curatorial Studies
    Taught by both a visiting scholar/curator and a SCAD faculty member, this seminar is organized around the expertise of the visiting scholar/curator. Students read and discuss the visiting scholar/curator's work and other work of comparable scope, scale or historical context. Through discussions, workshops, criticism and research projects, students work with the visiting scholar/curator to expand their critical understanding and the historical and cultural context of research projects or exhibitions. Prerequisite(s): Any 700-level ARLH or ARTH course or permission of the department chair.
  • ARTH 796 Issues in Art History
     

    ARTH 796

    Issues in Art History
    The topic of this course varies from quarter to quarter. Each course focuses on various issues in the field of art history. Prerequisite(s):