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Tag: aTVfest

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Feb.
9,
2014

Is that real? Uses for virtual and augmented reality in nonfiction TV

Posted Feb. 9 2014 by Tarana Mayes
The Virtual and Augmented Reality panel at aTVfest, with Janet Arlotta and John Howell from North Carolina-based (n+1) designstudio, opened my eyes to how 3D and motion media are giving producers on live TV sets unlimited possibilities.
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Feb.
8,
2014

Promotions: strategies for attracting a television audience

Posted Feb. 8 2014 by Tarana Mayes
Whether scripted or unscripted, television content doesn’t have an audience without promotion. The Promoting the Product panelists at aTVfest shared their approaches for attracting and building an audience, as well as proven methods for mutual promotion in today’s integrated media environment.
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Feb.
7,
2014

Executive Producer Tim Gibbons's truths for surviving TV

Posted Feb. 7 2014 by Tarana Mayes
Hosted by TV Week's Hillary Atkin, aTVfest's Q-and-A with Tim Gibbons, the executive producer of HBO’s monumental comedy Curb Your Enthusiasm and BET’s runaway hit Real Husbands of Hollywood, two shows that thrive on improvisation, fittingly gave the audience an improvised list of Truths f
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Feb.
7,
2014

Demystifying TV development: how to hone your pitch and sizzle

Posted Feb. 7 2014 by Tarana Mayes
One of the hardest things about selling a show idea is trying to figure out what your target, be it a network or production company, is thinking. The perfect formula of what they want and how they want it always seems elusive.
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Feb.
6,
2014

A letter to future television writers

Posted Feb. 6 2014 by Chris Auer
I teach a class at Savannah College of Art and Design where students write original television pilots. Lucky me, I get to read exciting material from writers who are just finding their voices and have something to say. As a teacher, it doesn’t get much better than that.