Comic-Con: Beatles bestseller, icy horror earns Eisner Awards for SCAD alumni

July
28
2014

More than 130,000 people attended the San Diego Comic-Con this year, but only a few walked away winners of the Eisner Awards, one of the top creative achievements in the comic books industry equivalent to the Academy Awards. Two of those winners were SCAD alumni Andrew Robinson (B.F.A., illustration, 1993) and Sean Murphy (B.F.A., sequential art, 2003).

Robinson won the Best Reality-Based Work award as the lead artist on “The Fifth Beatle: The Brian Epstein Story,” a Dark Horse graphic novel that reached number one on the New York Times bestseller list in 2013. It tells the life story of Brian Epstein, who is credited with discovering the Beatles when most major recording companies in London rejected the group. A screenplay based on the novel is in the works under “Ant-Man” director Peyton Reed.

Sean Murphy earned two awards for his work on “The Wake,” a horror series set on an Arctic oil rig that deals heavily with evolution and human origins. Murphy was awarded the Best Limited Series award, alongside writer Scott Snyder, and the Best Penciller/Inker award. The graphic novel is published through Vertigo, an imprint of DC Comics. Murphy was also nominated for Best Cover Artist.

Nick Dragotta (B.F.A., sequential art, 1997) was nominated for the Best Continuing Series award, alongside writer Jonathan Hickman, for his work on "East of West," a monthly dystopic western published through Image Comics.

We extend a well-deserved congratulations to our alumni for their hard work in the comics industry.

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Best of Animation 2014

July
22
2014

Our students produce a tremendous amount of work each year. In animation, students learn 2-D and 3-D techniques to prepare them for whatever role they may choose in the industry once they graduate. We've assembled a few of the best works from the 2013-14 school year to share with you.


"Balloon Cat" by Michael Ceminara (M.F.A., animation, 2013).


"Bear and the Bird" by Matt Barrera (B.F.A., animation, 2013).



"Halcyon-17" by Colin Wheeler (M.F.A., animation), Jeff MacDonald (M.A., animation, 2013) and Jenna Zona (M.F.A., animation).


"How I Wonder" by Nora Graven (B.F.A., animation, 2014).


"I M Possible" by Prasad Narse (M.F.A., animation, 2014).


"The Leaping Place" by Michelle Ionescu (B.F.A., animation, 2014).



"Starlight" by Tamarind King (M.F.A., animation), Marisa Tontaveetong (M.F.A., animation), Shir Wen Sun (B.F.A., illustration) and Yu Ueda (M.F.A., animation).

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A museum’s worth: artists’ perspectives on SCAD Museum of Art

July
1
2014

This week, Savannah College of Art and Design brings home three honors from the American Institute of Architects convention: the AIA Young Architect’s Award, the AIA Fellowship for Emerging Leaders and the 2014 AIA National Honor Award for Architecture for the SCAD Museum of Art. The mission of the latter is to ‘establish a standard of excellence against which all architects can measure performance, and inform the public of the breadth and value of architecture practice.’

But what do artists think? Here, Kehinde Wiley, Liza Lou, Stephen Antonakos, Alfredo Jaar, Rosemarie Fiore and Trenton Doyle Hancock lend an artist’s perspective on the value of SCAD Museum of Art. They join the ranks of exhibiting artists like Jason Middlebrook, Fred Wilson and Nicola López who have responded to SCAD Museum of Art's distinctiveness by creating site-specific installations for the museum.

Congratulations, SCAD Museum of Art, for successfully connecting past and present, emerging artists with established artists, in both form and substance, and for being a magnet the draws the world in to contemplate the transformative power of art and design.

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Architecture: a return to art is the way forward

June
26
2014

What would it look like if architects were allowed to be artists again; as comfortable in the manual and intuitive realms of drawing, painting and sculpture as with parametric modeling and digital imaging? What if we were to reject the limitations of product-driven, systematic design and production and re-engage the full range of tools innately available and refined over the course of millennia?


Watercolor by Christian Sottile.

The evolution from humanities to technology
Once considered to be among the principal arts, Architecture has passed through a technological revolution over the course of a century, moving from the art based approach of the famed French academy, the École des Beaux-Arts, to the functional dictums and objectivism of the German Bauhaus that would forever alter the course of design and education.

This revolution in education culminated during the digital era. Both the product and process of design entered the last phases of a radical transformation, unmoored from centuries of humanistic origins. Its success proved the potential of something distinctly other, with little emphasis on anthropomorphic, geographic or cultural connection; thereby embracing the full, expansive possibilities of the virtual and the synthetic. This last stage of the revolution has now passed its third decade, and we have grown increasingly detached from humanistic concerns.

An opportunity within reach
Firmly planted as we are in the digital era, the opportunity exists to reconsider the practices that preceded the revolution, to rescue tools that may have been set aside too quickly; tools that will prove essential in charting a way forward for architecture and design. What was jettisoned in the exuberance and upheaval of unprecedented technological innovation is the elusive quality that allows our buildings to speak to us: their humanity - evident and embedded in the pursuit of beauty and the art of making.

Today, this places the architecture profession at an extraordinary moment in history, an era in which we may now synthesize the best of the past with the victories of the digital revolution to embrace a truly hybridized future. It’s not the tired old debate between the École des Beaux Arts, a school of art, or the Bauhaus, a school of building, but rather a ‘BeauxHaus,’ a School of Building Arts.

Activating a fresh approach
At Savannah College of Art and Design, this approach to architecture is reflected in the SCAD Museum of Art. Built in 2010, SCAD MOA embodies what has long been taught in the SCAD School of Building Arts: the dissolution of boundaries between design disciplines. The museum is a place where the highest ideals of urban design, architecture, interior design, architectural history, historic preservation and furniture design all find distinct yet integrated expression.

SCAD Museum of Art: a case study
So how would a renewed emphasis on the tactile art of making - on the real - change the design process and the built environment?


Returning to SCAD MOA as a case study, at its core, the museum is a testimonial to synthesis, created using a design process that included the full spectrum of available tools and methods, from digital modeling and BIM, to physical model making, in situ mock-ups, sketching, painting, and digital collage. It’s a building brought about through a construction process that included full scale enlargements of hand-drawn details to create field templates; that included prefabricated modular building envelope components, integrated with local craftsman, practicing the most ancient of building trades, hand-crafting the building using the human hand and eye as their primary tools.



The confluence of disciplines embodied by SCAD MOA makes it one emblem for a new order of design that will allow architects to create the next generation of cities, to reject the soulless, placeless design strategies that characterized city centers created or recreated in the latter half of the 20th century; that will empower architects instead to create new places that come alive with a synthesis of art, humanism and delight, as well as technology and innovation.

This is the way forward.

Christian Sottile (M.Arch., 1997) is the dean of the School of Building Arts at Savannah College of Art and Design where he oversees programs in architecture, urban design, interior design, historic preservation, furniture design and architectural history. He is also design principal of Sottile & Sottile and the design architect for the SCAD Museum of Art.

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Updated: Emerging filmmakers 'see' their dreams come true

June
4
2014

Updated June 4: Congratulations to director Olivia Riley Day and her crew from Savannah College of Art and Design for winning the Sprite Films Fan Favorite Award for the short film “See Your Dreams.” America voted on “See Your Dreams” and five other student films that were finalists in the 2014 Sprite Films competition at sprite.com/films this spring. In return for racking up the most votes by the public, Olivia and the film’s co-producer Akmyrat Tuyliyev will receive a trip to the American Film Institute’s (AFI) film festival in November and a $5,000 donation to SCAD’s film department.

Posted on April 3: Breaking into film requires more than talent. It requires access and visibility. Olivia Riley Day (B.F.A., film and television, senior) from Savannah College of Art and Design found a direct line to both. She's one of six finalists participating in the Sprite Films program for student filmmakers and vying for a chance to win a contract to produce a Sprite branded project.

With her short film “See Your Dreams” up for the world to vote on now through May 15 at sprite.com/films, we delved into what makes director Olivia tick. She and Akmyrat Tuyliyev (B.F.A., film and television, senior), one of the film’s producers, just returned from CinemaCon in Las Vegas, Nev., where "See Your Dreams" was screened for industry leaders.

Olivia and Akmyrat, with the 2014 Sprite Films finalists, meet producer-director Ivan Reitman whose film "Draft Day" will be released on April 11. Photo credit: Michael Buckner/Getty Images.

Thread: Name one “pinch me" moment from CinemaCon?

O: The most unforgettable moment of CinemaCon, and probably my life, was at the awards ceremony. The announcer called my name and I stood while big-name stars actually clapped for me. It was kind of insane, and I still can't believe it happened.

T: What inspired the concept for “See Your Dreams”?

O: Everyone in life has had to overcome challenges, and some people face challenges that they believe are too great to overcome. This story is about believing in yourself and always staying true to your dreams, and if you don't give up, your dreams will one day become a reality.


Olivia and Akmyrat at work on the McDonough, Ga. set of "See Your Dreams."

T: How did you develop your passion for film?

O: I always loved the escape that going to the movies gave me, however I did not realize my passion for film until I went to three and a half years of business school and knew that I needed to express my creative side to be happy. I am a natural born leader/director so it was only fitting to control the creative side of the one thing in life that I love more than anything, the movies.

T: What are some trends, techniques or technologies that you’re watching?

O: I don't worry about the latest trends or technology past what is going to get my story across the best. If a new technology comes out that strikes my interest and benefits my story I will utilize it, but as of right now I stick to digital. One day I would love to work with the robots Bot & Dolly, they are a very expensive and unique technology that only extremely successful filmmakers get the opportunity to work with.

T: What’s your advice to aspiring student filmmakers?

O: I recommend looking out for opportunities like Sprite Films. The program has allowed me to compete at a higher level, thus gain recognition at a higher level, and has helped me get one step closer to seeing my dreams become a reality. If you are in film school, I recommend that you attend all the film festivals you can because that’s where you can meet industry professionals and establish connections that could lead to greater opportunities once out of college.

T: How has the Savannah Film Festival molded you as a filmmaker?

O: The Savannah Film Festival has allowed me to establish connections with industry professionals I otherwise would not have been able to meet and given me wonderful insight from famous directors that I will carry with me forever.

T: Anything else that you want Thread to know?

O: Never stop 'seeing your dreams,' and if you don't know what they are, do not stop searching until you find them.

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From the pages of Vogue to grad school: a fibers student's untraditional spin on fashion

May
23
2014

I first met Marv Graff (M.F.A., fibers, 2015) while studying abroad at Savannah College of Art and Design in Lacoste. His unique eye for fashion left quite an impression. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art clearly was equally impressed by Marv, having added a tunic he created to the permanent collection of The Costume Institute.) Marv creates his garments using one of a kind found objects, and the antique markets of Provence were a treasure trove for his creativity. He visited the markets often during his stay in Lacoste and was known among the market owners in Isle Sur la Sorgue as "Mr. Hollywood." Marv created three looks for the 2014 SCAD Fashion Show. It was incredible to see how his explorations in Lacoste carried over to the pieces he showed on the runway at SCAD Museum of Art in Savannah, Georgia.


Marv in his studio at Pepe Hall.

This first look, shown above, was inspired by an antique fireplace screen Marv found in a shop in Bluffton, South Carolina. Marv loved the way the screen fanned out to like peacock feathers and decided to create a petal skirt in its image, working with a SCAD graduate to laser-cut the screen's pattern into the leather.



Marv's second look started with an antique hoop skirt from Peddler Jim's Antiques in Savannah. Making the skirt was a labor intsensive process, complete with handmade knotting and macrame techniques, and the paired top was even more intricate, taking over 16 hours to make.


Marv's final look was inspired by one of the projects he started when he first came to SCAD. On one of his many antique hunts, he came across a taxidermied, polyurethane shell of a deer and began braiding and knotting over it, starting with the legs. From then on, braided deer antlers became his trademark touch.



Thread: You had a very successful career in New York. When and why did you come to SCAD?

Marv Graff: I came to SCAD in September 2013. I kind of just jumped on a train from New York and came down here. I needed a change.

T: What has changed for you? Why did you decide to leave your career in fashion and jewelry design?

M: I felt like I wasn’t being so creative. I was just gearing everything towards marketing fulfillment and not creative fulfillment. Being at SCAD has brought me back to where I was when I graduated the first time. When I graduated from the University of Nebraska, I was doing really unusual things regarding to body and fashion. I just started making things and selling things in New York and that’s pretty much how my whole career started. I would just take a suitcase full of stuff I had made around for fashion editors and stores to see. But keep in mind, in those days it was pretty easy. Then I came to SCAD because it was my dream to be able to do fashion like this, and it’s amazing that it's happening.

Marv's previous work, created at SCAD Lacoste.

T: What is it about SCAD that spurred that creative drive?

M: When I was in New York, every weekend I’d go to boutiques and galleries and see everything that was new and popular. When I came to Savannah, there was none of that. So I made my own, and that became my goal: to find and create things. I’m also very inspired by the way that SCAD goes about making their classrooms. The buildings are beautiful, and that makes up for the lack of fancy galleries in Savannah, compared to New York City. These buildings become that. Like Morris Hall, the new Fashion Marketing and Managment building and Hayman's Hall, the new Illustration building.

T: What's next for you? Will you return to New York after graduating?

M: I’m keeping my options open to see what happens. I taught at Kansas State University and I was making these sweaters that were hand-loomed on cardboard, and they had feathers and tentacles. I was selling them to stores in New York and the fashion press picked me up at that time. I got a lot of really good press early on. I would say I had Andy Warhol’s 15 minutes of fame when I was there. I won this young designer award, Pré de Cache, but fashion was really hard to produce, and the cost of jewelry was easier for an individual designer without any backing. So that’s how I got into the fashion jewelry industry.


Whichever road Marv should choose, he is sure to have a successful second act, the beginnings of which his followers may just trace back to the runway in Savannah.

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SCAD students bring "Authenticity" to ICFF

May
19
2014

From the first time I saw the early renderings of the “Authenticity” exhibit being designed for the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) in New York (May 17 - 20) by 20 Savannah College of Art and Design students and three faculty members from three academic programs – furniture design, interior design and fibers – I had to ask: “What is it?”

As the only non-designer in the room, I kept this question to myself thinking, "Perhaps I missed the point." But, guided by the students and their leaders, professors George Perez, Jessica Smith and Charles Boggs, I became keenly aware of how I was experiencing design.

I got closer and started playing with the individual pieces of the exhibition – the beams, the etched faceplates and the augmented reality app. As you’ll see in this video tour of the installation, lead by Sharra Culp (B.F.A., interior design), asking that question then interacting with the installation was exactly the point.

While at ICFF, I had the pleasure of meeting Sharra and the other talented students who are responsible for “Authenticity”:

Yuliana Alvarado (M. F. A., furniture design)
Heidi Blair (B. F. A., furniture design
Sharra Culp (B. F. A.,  interior design)
Maria Gardon (B. F. A., interior design)
Carla Gonzalez (B. F. A., fibers)
Annabelle Guldner (B. F. A., interior design)
Caroline Hanson (B. F. A., fibers)
Killian Hlava (B. F. A., fibers)
Shawn Horsey (B. F. A., furniture design)
Kaitlyn Maloney (B. F. A., furniture design)
Riley Mate (B. F. A.,  fibers)
Eny Parker (M. F. A., furniture design)
Jake Rowe (B. F. A., interior design)
Alin Saenz (B. F. A., fibers)
Shanmuga Selvaraj (M. F. A., interior design)
Tanner Svoboda (M. F. A., furniture design)
Peony Tsang (B. F. A., interior design
Emma Wood (B. F. A., fibers)
Elizabeth Bull (B.F.A., fibers)
Suzanne Nelson (B.F.A., furniture design)

Here they are at work on the installation.

Jose Mallabo currently leads PR and Marketing for SCAD and has spent 23 years leading communications programs and strategies for companies and clients like eBay, LinkedIn, FedEx, HP, Xerox and Kodak. He has launched corporate blogs for eBay, GSI Commerce and set the strategy for the launch and creation of Thread. Follow him on Twitter @JoseMallabo.

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Fashion Week vs. student fashion show

May
18
2014

For fashion students at Savannah College of Art and Design, the annual fashion show is both the culmination of their academic preparation and the precipice from which they will jump into the fashion world. Ninety student-made and designed looks graced the runway for the 2014 SCAD Fashion Show at the SCAD Museum of Art. Not only do the garments reflect intensive preparation in design, CAD work, draping and ideation, but an uncanny ‘oneness’ with what the industry showed at Fashion Week. The undergraduates and graduates, selected by jury to participate in the show, began working on their looks in September before they even laid eyes on what the runways of New York, London, Paris and Milan would see earlier this year.

Student designers watch their looks on the runway in SCAD's Poetter Gallery.

SCAD School of Fashion dean Michael Fink walked us through how in-step the student looks are with, or ahead of, some major trends in fashion.

Michael Fink: We saw a lot of pinky tones, lilac, light or nude colors in the Fall 2014 Ready-to-Wear collections, as well as white and off-white.

Ralph Lauren, Wes Gordon and Christopher Kane.

Our students have this color palette covered in a variety of different ways, from evening to day.


Collection by Haley Beyer (B.F.A., fashion).


Collection by Tingting Feng (B.F.A., fashion).

On the runways in New York, London, Paris and Milan you saw these architectural shapes.


Marc Jacobs, Balmain and Ashish.

This collection by Hannah Amundson (B.F.A., fashion) is very architectural. The story behind the garments is that her roommate moved out of their shared apartment and took the only mirror they had. Hannah realized how much she relied on the mirror. So her designs are all about being vain, and on the clothes there are inserts where it will say “vain” or “obsessed,” references to how we are so fixated on our own image.


Collection by Hannah Amundson (B.F.A., fashion).

Also, Yuxi Bi (B.F.A., fashion) goes to the stand and just drapes and experiments and creates architectural shapes without a pattern.


Collection by Yuxi Bi (B.F.A., fashion).

We saw this cobalt blue color on the runways and we have a collection that is just cobalt blue and gray. So this is definitely something we’ve seen out of our students in terms of color trend.


Mark Fast and Proenza Schouler.


Collection by Lin Han (B.F.A., fashion).

At Fashion Week you saw oversized patterns. Whether it’s one pattern, or a mixture of patterns, that was very big, especially in London, which speaks to our students’ mix and match sensibilities. Here you start to see a mix of materials and patterns challenging you where to look.


Marco de Vincenzo, Prada and Suno.

Like those mixed patterns, Madisen Matney's (B.F.A., fashion) collection is bold, in your face, and it’s in honor of her grandmother who has Alzheimer’s. She worked with a textiles student and on each piece there is a face peeking out from the layers.


Collection by Madison Matney (B.F.A., fashion).

These are fall collections, so you think about plaids anyway, but the students have been working a year ahead of the trend.


Delpozo and Yigal Azrouel.

We have seen some incredible plaid work out of the students. For example, in this collection by Katherine Absher (B.F.A., fashion) these are hand-foiled. She has taken the fabric and done a foiling process.


Collection by Katherine Absher (B.FA., fashion).

This color palette, various shades of coral and orange, was prevalent on the runways.


Narciso Rodriguez, Issa and Zac Posen.

We have one student collection that captures that beautifully and that’s really hard. It's difficult to make those colors sit well on the body.


Collection by Jiaren Du (B.F.A., fashion).

Jiaren Du (B.F.A., fashion) worked for a year on this, but we didn’t see the collection for what it was until we saw it on stage. It was so arresting.


Collection by Julia Patton (B.F.A., fashion).

When it comes to Fashion Week, each city is so different. This is Milan. It’s a bit more tailored. Here are these bright pops of color everywhere. We saw that in Paris, too. You see big patterns. They’re not subtle clothes. Paris, what strikes me here is this Valentino. Very graphic. And Dior, color blocking in a different way. You have bold color with a lighter companion, so you have these pops. That’s the color pop we’re talking about.


Fausto Puglisi, Valentino and Dior.

In terms of student work, you also see some really big pops of colors. Both of these, for example, are on a graffiti tangent. Each designer had artists develop prints for them. It’s color blocking, it’s print, it’s bright.


Collection by Renata Dabdoub (B.F.A., fashion).


Collection by Leah Smith (B.F.A., fashion).

This whole idea by Burberry was all hand-painted. Everything had the touch of hand on it and we certainly have many collections like that here at SCAD because we’re an art school.


Burberry Prorsum, Duckie Brown and Yohji Yamamoto.

These are Wenxiao Wang's (M.A., fashion, 2013) own illustrations that she had reprinted.


Collection by Wenxiao Wang (M.A., fashion).


Collection by Zenobia Duncan (M.A., fashion).

That’s just an overview of the student looks we saw on the runway at the SCAD Fashion Show and how they compare to what we saw at Fashion Week.

 

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Drone captures art and design students sculpting the sands of Tybee

May
4
2014

When you're a student at Savannah College of Art and Design, your medium isn't restricted to the traditional and the classroom extends to the ocean.

 

Hundreds of students, alumni and faculty focused their talents on the sands of Tybee Island, Ga. to create SCAD Fine Arts' and Foundation Studies' 2014 parade of sculptures that welcomed summer's arrival and enthralled thousands of winter-weary beach goers. In addition to indulging in the open air studio, each individual entrant or team competed for $5,000 in prizes. The first place winners are:

Sand Sculpture and Alumni’s Choice Award: #4 “Walden”

Chennon Roberts, B.F.A. animation student, Auburn, AL
Josh Beam, B.F.A. illustration student, North Charleston, SC

Sand Castle:  #1 “Ice”

Adrian Tinoco, B.F.A. visual effects student, Key Biscayne, FL
Gian Lombardi, B.F.A. visual effects student, Doral, FL

Sand Relief: #13 “Turtles”

Emily Luking, B.F.A. fibers student, Ellicott City, MD
Raven Brown, B.F.A. fibers student, Marietta, GA
Lydia Hartley, B.F.A. fibers student, Wilmington, NC

Wind Sculpture: #7 “Wing-tipped vortices”

Jamie Niles, B.F.A. painting student, Richmond Hill, GA

Gray’s Reef Best Underwater Creature: #7 “Hermit Crab”

Benjamin Breslow, B.F.A. industrial design student, Platte City, MO
Jeff Dull, B.F.A. industrial design student, Strasburg, PA
Michael Soleo, B.F.A. industrial design student, Lexington Park, MD

35th Anniversary Spirit Award: #7 “35 Years"

Hugo Aguilera, B.F.A., painting, 2011
Will Penny, M.F.A., painting, 2013, B.F.A., painting, 2008

SCAD Castle Award: #4 “Poetter Hall”

Paula Hoffman, professor, foundation studies
Matt Toole, professor, foundation studies

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Waste to Art: HSBC-SCAD Hong Kong exhibit redefines reuse

April
30
2014

One last nod to Mother Earth before Earth Month slips away. Behold the thought-provoking and stunning pieces that comprise the Hong Kong exhibition, "Waste to Art." The show is a result of HSBC's partnership with 29 Savannah College of Art and Design freshmen to raise environmental awareness within the bank's community. In three months time, the students made sculptures composed entirely of recycled waste provided by the bank, including plastic, paper, and electronics. The 23 sculptures, which bear the fruit of the students' diverse academic pursuits at SCAD Hong Kong as much as they do an astute social conciousness, will be displayed at HSBC locations until June 22. Additionally, HSBC is considering adding several of the pieces to its permanent art collection, which includes works by Chinese and western artists, like George Chinnery.


"E-body" by Abinanth Ashok (B.F.A., visual effects) and Mariam Zamani (B.F.A., graphic design). Made of cardboard, wire mesh, cable wires, clock, motherboards and printer gears.

E-body represents a human race that contains electronic parts which many of us carelessly discard. It foretells the future of mankind if timely precautions are not made.
 


"Lai See/Paper Tapestry" by Rhéa Duckworth (B.F.A., advertising) and Rhea Nayar (B.F.A., architecture). Made of newspaper and shredded paper.

Lai See/Paper Tapestry was inspired by one issue: We sought to portray the falling motion of waste entering the landfill, where 25% of Hong Kong's paper ends up.


"Tech Smog" by Anastasia Simone (B.F.A., advertising) and Jonathan 'Jay' Lee( B.F.A., advertising). Made of keyboards and wires.

Tech Smog represents a sinister cloud because this deadly form of pollution is not often brought to light. It's about treating e-waste like dangerous pollution. We believe recycling is not enough. We don’t really want to make something look like waste. We want to make something that looks like art, not just screaming 'recycling.' It's just there quietly and sends you the message that you don’t really have to think about it.


"I wasted time, and now doth time waste me" by Inga Nelli (B.F.A., painting). Made of steel, acrylics and recycled plastic pellets.

The monumental hourglass, with waste trickling down, reinforces the idea that time runs out as waste becomes a permanent part of our nature. Viewers are invited to invert the hourglass.


"Take-A-Waste" by Daniel Kostianos (B.F.A., graphic design). Made of cardboard, cables and bamboo.

Based on the premise of consuming less and reducing more, this piece is made entirely out of discarded computer cables, cardboard and a pair of bamboo sticks rescued from the rubbish bin.


"Plastic is the New Porcelain" by Dawn Bey (B.F.A., fashion). Made of plastic bottles and wax.

By making plastic bottles resemble modern-day Ming vases, this piece elevates the status of such material into imperial ornaments, leading viewers to reflect on the widespread usage of plastic in our society today. I melted wax and dipped the plastic bottles and coated them a few times until they look really smooth, like porcelain. I made three types of bottles: plain, a layer of rice paper under a layer of wax, and wax printed on wax. All made of classic Chinese imagery like bamboo and plum blossoms.

"SPLURT" by Andre Ho, (B.F.A., interactive design and game development), Ellen Siu (B.F.A., interior design) and Jenn Lam (B.F.A., illustration). Made of shredded paper and foam.

This piece symbolizes the excessive use of paper in Hong Kong, showing that our landfills are overflowing and warning us that it soon may fill our streets.


"Stained City" by Jeselle Leung (B.F.A., photography). Made of plastic bottle labels and steel.

When will we start to take care of the place that we live in? A city made from waste prompts viewers to reflect on how they are affecting the community.

"E Bird" by Wesley Yau (B.F.A., visual effects) and James Hou (B.F.A., fashion marketing and management). Made of wires, metal, and CDs.

We love nature; and since birds are fragile creatures, we have created this bird sculpture to raise public awareness of e-waste harming animals in Hong Kong. 
 

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