Weather Alert: SCAD Atlanta to operate on late start Feb. 26

February
25
2015

Due to inclement weather, SCAD Atlanta will open for students, faculty and staff on Thursday, Feb. 26 at 11 a.m. Classes scheduled 8 – 10:30 a.m. on Feb. 26 will be rescheduled for Friday, March 6 .

SCAD Atlanta transportation will resume operations on Thursday, Feb. 26 at 10:45 a.m., weather permitting. SCAD dining services will operate in the Hub on the weekend schedule tomorrow; 11 a.m. - 2 p.m., and for dinner.

Continue to monitor your email, cell phones, the SCAD Twitter feed and the blog.

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UPDATED Weather Alert: SCAD Atlanta to be closed on Feb. 25

February
24
2015

UPDATED: Feb. 25

For SCAD Atlanta students who wish to attend the SCAD Career Fair on Friday, Feb. 27 but have been affected by rescheduling of the Feb. 25 classes, please email careersatl@scad.edu with the subject line "Missing class for career fair in Savannah" by Thursday, Feb. 26 at 5:30 p.m. Once we receive your email, faculty will contact you with an alternative make-up date.

Due to anticipated inclement weather, SCAD Atlanta will be closed on Wednesday, Feb. 25 and resume operations on Thursday, Feb. 26, weather permitting.

SCAD Atlanta dining services will operate in the Hub on the weekend schedule on Feb. 25. SCAD Atlanta transportation will resume operations on Thursday, Feb. 26 at 7 a.m., weather permitting. 

All Feb. 25 classes are rescheduled for Friday, Feb. 27. Per SCAD’s policy outlined in the employee handbook, all staff is paid during any campus location closure.

For updates, please monitor your email, cell phones, the SCAD Twitter feed and the blog.

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Weather Alert: SCAD Atlanta to operate on late start Feb. 26
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Virtual reality for all

February
23
2015

A thick envelope carrying a letter of acceptance was once the most exciting thing a college bound student could anticipate receiving in the mail. But virtual reality is changing that, and much more. For 5,000 students accepted by Savannah College of Art and Design, a package containing VR goggles may just have upstaged their acceptance letter.

VR has long been pursued as a tool for immersive storytelling. SCAD is using it to help students get an idea of what their story could be here. What they’ll see through their goggles isn’t fantasy, but a 360-degree, real-life experience. Using the gyroscope in smartphones, the goggles create a display for the left and right eye, allowing the user to feel as though they’re walking around SCAD’s locations. If you can’t visit Atlanta from California, say, VR will take you there.

The cardboard goggles, which will arrive flat packed on students' doorsteps, and their predecessor Oculus Rift, are far sleeker than the first generations of clunky VR headsets. In addition to a wider field of view and better graphics, in the case of computer-simulated environments, the release of consumer oriented, open source Google Cardboard finally made VR an affordable and real tool for all manner of applications, including education. Oculus is expected to release a more affordable version of their headset in late 2015.

Experts, including SCAD interactive design and game development professor Josephine Leong, are enthusiastic about the possibilities that fresh VR technologies can create.

What we’re starting to see is VR for the masses. I show these tools to my students because they are going to be designing for this generation. Google put it out there, but it’s up to the individual to figure out how to use it. That's what’s going to make it innovative. – Josephine Leong

Ironically, in the 1990s, a growing focus on another phenomenon that brings more utility to VR – the rise of the internet – helped scuttle remaining hope for advancement. Up until that point, VR saw 20 years or more of halting progress for medical and military research and, of course, gaming. But VR also has roots in CAD, music and interactive art, which made us realize that VR can not only help art and design students preview where they’ll study, but what they’ll study, and what they’ll make.

SCAD’s plans include expanding the targets for their goggles to high schools and teachers. The content will become more varied, too. Videos on university exhibitions and events like Chinese New Year and the university fashion show will help these experiences transcend geography and engage a wider audience, extending the classroom beyond the traditional brick and mortar.

Here’s a few more uses for VR that have our attention:

Animation
Tina O’Hailey, dean, School of Digital Media
"Google’s partnership with Disney animator Glen Keane to create the short interactive film 'Duet' for the Spotlight Stories series is exactly where we are pushing students to think: 'How else can a story be experienced?' It is very exciting."

Architectural History
Celeste Guichard, professor
"One difficult thing about teaching architectural history in a classroom is that the building being taught must be conveyed primarily through still, two-dimensional images limited to the size of the projection screen. With its ability to transport students from the classroom to, say, the Pantheon in Rome and give them power to navigate and explore, immersive virtual reality technology could do wonders in helping students experience and learn about a building - or a city or garden - more effectively. Teachers could structure a lesson as though they were there, in person, with their students."

Film and Television
Michael Chaney, professor
"Comparatively, cinema is a relatively young art medium. Oculus Story Studio is an exciting example of how cinema is changing and emerging as a more complex system of storytelling. This is precisely what we're doing at SCAD, encouraging our students to innovate and create beyond the margins."

Interior Design
Liset Robinson, professor
"Today, the interior designer can provide a walk through of the building, and evaluate it in 3D through virtual reality software. One such example is the VR walk through designed by my students using Sketchup for the Beaulieu collaborative project. The walk-through began on the outside of the building displaying the sustainable features of the design and took the client on a virtual trip through the corporate headquarters giving them a realistic preview of reality, all the way down to the details of the graphics on the glass and walls. If changes need to be made, the manipulation of the interior space is made in 3D, and this is translated into 2D drawings through the use of the software. Clients become part of the design process."

Architecture
Elaine Gallagher, professor
"Phil Freelon is an architect who wields virtual reality like a magician. His team makes beautiful videos as part of the process to win projects."

Jewelry 
Jay Song, chair
"Starting in 2010, several luxury brands engaged in limited projects that used augmented reality to create virtual try on scenarios. These innovative uses of virtual reality allowed mainstream clients to model and ‘wear’ luxury brands like Boucheron and Bulgari. Technology that can allow customers to experience jewelry or change design components with a click will revolutionize the customization of jewelry. Using product visualization solutions clearly will change jewelry buying practices, but may also impact jewelry exhibition strategies, allowing museum curators to create opportunities for the public to experience the jewelry beyond the vitrine."

The strides VR has made in just the last year alone - be they for Google Cardboard, Oculus Rift, Sony’s Morpheus or Samsung’s Gear VR - has popular opinion betting that this time applications like these really will get better.

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In honor of Fashion Week: career advice from Oscar de la Renta

February
18
2015

The debut of Peter Copping’s first collection as creative director of Oscar de la Renta at New York Fashion Week reminds us of the designer’s timeless advice to students of the industry. During his 2001 visit to Savannah College of Art and Design to accept the André Leon Talley Lifetime Achievement Award, Mr. de la Renta emphasized the importance of fresh ideas. Hear what he shared below and see his philosophy embodied in the exhibition Oscar de la Renta: His Legendary World of Style now through May 3 at SCAD Musuem of Art.

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Weather Alert: SCAD Atlanta to open at 11 a.m. on Feb. 17

February
16
2015
By

Due to inclement weather, SCAD Atlanta will open for students, faculty and staff on Tuesday, Feb. 17 at 11 a.m. Classes scheduled 8 – 10:30 a.m. on Feb. 17 will be rescheduled for Friday, Feb. 20.

SCAD Atlanta transportation will resume operations on Tuesday, Feb. 17 at 10:45 a.m., weather permitting.

SCAD dining services will operate in the Hub on the weekend schedule and will be open until 2 p.m. tomorrow.

Continue to monitor your email, cell phones, the SCAD Twitter feed and the university's blog for updates.

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At SCAD Savannah bikes know no season

January
29
2015

Got spring? No doubt, our friends up North are asking that. Winter will endure for a good while longer, but when it comes to commuting to and from classes at Savannah College of Art and Design, it is eternal spring. 

That's because in a recent university survey, roughly 30 percent of SCAD Savannah students said they cycle daily or weekly. That’s compared to two percent for the general population of commuters in Savannah and the national average of just over one percent. Can’t say that we blame you, New England.

With major infrastructure improvements coming soon to Savannah streets, thanks to advocates like Savannah Bicycle Campaign, photo opps like these are sure to grow.

 

 

Golden #bike at #SCAD #style

A photo posted by Marc Mueller (@muellermm) 

 

A photo posted by @scaddotedu on

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Beyond Google Glass: Geoffrey Beene scholarship winner makes wearable tech beautiful

January
9
2015

Imagine a high-end piece of jewelry whose materials – the finest silver and semi-precious stones - elegantly camoflauge a host of technology designed to maximize your personal performance. Haven’t you seen this somewhere? The MICA bracelet at Barney’s? Tory Burch for Fitbit? No. The versatile collection of smart luxury jewelry that hosts bio and emotional feedback, performance and GPS tracking, and Bluetooth enabled alerts, exists in the case study that won fashion student Elva Jiang a 2015 Geoffrey Beene National Scholarship for $30,000.

Balancing her roles at Savannah College of Art and Design as an All American athlete on the university’s golf team and double major in fashion design and fashion marketing and management, Elva could very well be the target customer of her Spiked Orchid collection of smart rings, earrings, bracelets and necklaces. By wearing any of these pieces and using the accompanying app, a woman could track her golf or tennis swing with the motion sensor, get bio-feedback with the skin conductance sensor, access her favorite music, and stay on top of incoming messages via Bluetooth.

These prototypes by Yinglei Liu (B.F.A., jewelry, senior) helped bring Elva’s concept collection to life. Photographs by Niduan Zhou (B.F.A., photography, 2014).
An average week for Elva includes four days of classes, up to three hours of golf practice five days a week, including a minimum of three workouts, and Bikram yoga sprinkled in during her rare free time.

Being a student athlete pushes me to work with hyper-efficiency because knowing that I have less free time than regular students, I make sure that I cherish every minute I have to complete my school projects in time. In other words, being on the golf team gives me the momentum I need to work harder and to always strive for better.

Elva is on the path of the driven and discerning woman who inspired Spiked Orchid. She laid the foundation for winning the Geoffrey Beene Scholarship when she won a Young Menswear Association (YMA) Scholarship for $5,000. In response to the challenge put to the 2014 YMA Scholarship hopefuls to present a plan to help retailer JC Penney connect with the millennial customer, Elva created a label called Glass Ceiling. In her words, Glass Ceiling would, “Empower the young, business-minded Millennial woman who strives to transcend economic and social boundaries to take over the ‘corner office’ and become the top executive of a company.”

When SCAD selected Elva to represent the university in the competition for the Geoffrey Beene Scholarship, she continued this theme of using fashion to empower the modern woman, while also tapping her passion for golf.

Women’s empowerment has been a running theme throughout my YMA case studies because I simply hope that modern women, including myself, can be treated and empowered in ways that allow them to achieve their full potential.

Golf has been a catalyst, giving Elva an edge in fulfilling her potential. This firsthand experience is what helped her build on existing products like Cuff to deliver a product proposal perfectly suited for women whose business endeavors transcend office walls.


Elva completed a summer internship in the corporate marketing department of Global Brands Group. In between designing a look book for Jonathan Adler’s accessory collection and graphics for Tignanello’s social media platforms, she took advantage of YMA’s "Breakfast with the Bosses" series, which put her in striking distance of CEOs in the fashion industry. At one particular breakfast, DDK Apparel CEO Paul Rosengard mentioned his next goal was to become a single-digit golfer. Elva immediately introduced herself and was soon enjoying a round with Paul and the general counsel of Li & Fung.

On the golf course we’re all equal. They don’t treat me like a student. If not for golf, I wouldn’t have built those relationships, which were very helpful in my presentation for the Geoffrey Beene Scholarship.


As a resident of Taiwan, Elva believes the scholarship will help her obtain the O-1 Visa so she can begin her career as a buyer in New York following her graduation from SCAD. But just like the women she had in mind when creating Spiked Orchid, Elva’s vision isn’t restricted by geography.

Growing up in Beijing allowed me to witness the civilization and the fast-growing fashion industry in China, which has influenced me to believe that Beijing and Shanghai both have the potential to be the next fashion capitals in the world.

Wherever she lands, the convergence of wearable tech and active sportswear are sure to keep Elva inspired and equipped for success.

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Happy Holidays

December
23
2014

Happy Holidays from the SCAD blog! It has been a pleasure throughout the year to share your stories and your work, work like you’ll see enclosed from our talented students and alumni. The blog’s mission is to share the best in art and design. Thanks for making it so easy and for submitting your art for inclusion in our card. Best wishes in 2015, and keep us 'posted'.

 

 

"Limerick"
Annie Tyner, graphic design and illustration

 

Craig Matola, industrial design

Craig Matola, industrial design

"Christmas Adventure"
Alissa Berkhan, illustration

"Christmas Adventure"
Alissa Berkhan, illustration

 

 

"The Beauty & The Terrible Beast"
Carolin Leary Prinn, B.F.A., painting, 2010

"Merry and Bright"
Stephanie Meyer, illustration

 

"Rudolph"
Stephanie Meyer, illustration

 

 

 

 

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Submit your art for Thread's holiday card

December
12
2014

We're making a list of our favorite holiday-inspired art by our talented student body at Savannah College of Art and Design. Students, submit an original work that captures the festivity of the season to blog@scad.edu by 12 a.m. EST on December 22 for a chance to be featured in the blog's second annual holiday card. We thought this image (above) by recent alum Jade Stickle (B.F.A., motion media, 2014) would provide inspiration.

The following image types are acceptable: .jpg, .tif, .psd, .pdf, .ai, .eps. For the image size, the longest edge (height or width) must be at least 1920 pixels. Don't forget to include the title of the work, if any, your name and degree program.

We'll publish the card and selected work during the week of December 22. The prize? Bragging rights at your family feast and on your social channels. We look forward to seeing how you "make" merry.

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Congratulations, graduates! SCAD commencement in pictures.

November
24
2014

Here's to the 413 new alumni from Savannah College of Art and Design who graduated in the university's 35th commencement ceremonies. We agree with Academy Award-winning screenwriter Geoffrey Fletcher's characterization of you as individuals and as a class: you are brilliant 'containers of gifts that you will share with the world.' Please keep us posted on all that you do.


 

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