Finding creative talent: employers share 4 in-demand traits

March
3
2015

More than 150 companies attended Savannah College of Art and Design’s annual career fair in search of the next great creative talent. They ranged from boutique outfits like animation house Bento Box Entertainment, to behemoths like Amazon and Proctor & Gamble. Whether these employers are design oriented in their function, or using design to enhance their mission, the talent they’re recruiting has never been better prepared or more sought after.

The awareness of and demand for what we do as artists and designers is ten times what it was 30 years ago. – Doug Grimmett, Primal Screen

 

Which path to success at #SCAD Career Fair will you take?

A video posted by @scaddotedu on

 

Doug Grimmett, whose motion graphics company Primal Screen created the psychedelic '60s trailer for the final season of Mad Men, has been recruiting at SCAD for seven years. He’s one of the industry leaders who weighed in on our question: What are the most important attributes for future creative professionals to posses? Four qualities emerged on which this diverse group of employers agreed. The way they see it, the next great designers, animators, producers, art directors and more will:

Be generalists
The employers in our informal focus group agreed that an influx of rapidly changing technology means that too much specialization could render young talent irrelevant. Instead, they prefer young recruits to have a broad range of abilities that will enable them to be the ultimate team players. This is definitely the case in the growing world of independent films, shared producer Tamanna Shah, where time and budget constraints make the adaptable staffer a commodity.

Be mobile
The project-oriented nature of creative initiatives, in which teams are built today and disbanded tomorrow, means that the prospect who’s willing to travel is the one who might get the most work. Keeping with the film industry as an example, this is especially so given the dependence on state tax incentives, which production companies and their crews routinely relocate to capture.

Be detail-oriented
Recruiters repeatedly stressed their interest in the candidate who minds the details and mines the details. Reps from fair flung industries emphasized their interest in prospects who can grasp intricacies well before production, in the planning phase, especially through their sketches and drawings. As IBM designer Rebecca Lemker explained, the details are so important that the software giant recently introduced the new position of design researcher, whose task it is to surface the finer points that will ultimately help shape a better product. Rebecca and the others use portfolio reviews not only to evaluate a candidate’s eye for details, but also the decisions they made to include them.

Be brand aware
There have never been more ways for companies to communicate the essence of their brands so, it follows, that artists and designers who can support these initiatives would be in high demand. If talent is just the price of admission, as one recruiter put it, then prospects can distinguish themselves by demonstrating a grasp of the brand they want to work for, before they work there. For BCBG Max Azria HR director Christina Chiaro, reviewing a portfolio and seeing designs that match the brand is a signal the candidate has done their homework and posses the skill needed to succeed at the label.

In addition to agreeing on these basic characteristics, the recruiters overwhelmingly recommended that job seekers, “Do what they love.” Unsurprisingly, that advice pairs well with the qualities they seek.

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deFINE ART 2015 honoree Xu Bing returns to SCAD

February
20
2015

Savannah College of Art and Design honoree, Chinese artist Xu Bing, first visited SCAD ten years ago, well before the existence of SCAD Museum of Art, where his exhibition, “Things Are Not What They First Appear,” is showing through July 3. Then as now, the MacArthur Fellow and U.S. Department of State Medal of Arts recipient invigorated this community of emerging artists with his lecture and work. Bing’s 2015 deFINE ART keynote, in which he chronicled his most recent exhibitions, was as transparent as his series, “Background Story.” In his interview with SCAD shone through a personal mission, which Bing also shared in his keynote address: to use his exhibitions to further art education, now matter where his work takes him. Here are excerpts of our conversation with him, conducted with the assistance of his student interpreter at SCAD's Magnolia Hall.

SCAD: Our students enthusiastically lined up to see your gallery tour at deFINE ART, snapping photos and no doubt posting them to their social networks. As a recent adopter of Instagram, what do you think of social media as a platform for sharing artistic works?

Xu Bing: I am always slow in this technology. I’m very late compared to others to use social media tools, even in China. I don’t use it a lot because I feel that nowadays social media provides people with too much information, and you are kind of just torn into too many pieces. You kind of lose yourself to it. Meanwhile, it is very valuable because it has changed people’s every day life. As you said, it reflects what young people like and that can be the future of the world. We recently started to use Instagram because we recognize its power as a tool. 

S: Seen at SCAD MOA, the diversity in your practice is particularly striking because of the close proximity of the works that comprise, “Things Are Not What They First Appear.” Do you advise students to have a multi-disciplinary practice?

XB: I would tell them, please don’t focus only on the forms of art, the styles of art or what media you’re going to use, because all those forms are already fixed, they can hardly be used to address contemporary problems or situations. So if you only limit your thinking or creation to what style you’re going to use, or what category you’re going to put your art into, then you can hardly be a successful artist.

S: Is there any one message that you most want artists and students of art to take away from your keynote address?

XB: I want to show my appreciation for SCAD. I’m honored to be here to get this award. I want students to takeaway that there are so many choices in contemporary art now, so please stick to what you really want. There is one experience of mine I really want to share.

I feel like everyone has his or her own strengths or limitations. The question is how you adapt your limitation into something that only you have and try to make the full use out of it. - Xu Bing

S: Sometimes we can’t make sense of our immediate surroundings until an outsider comes and puts them in perspective. What was the reaction in Durham when “Tobacco Project” opened there? How did it differ from the reaction in Shanghai and Savannah?

XB: I didn’t realize a difference in the audience feedback, however, I felt one thing really intensely and that is that people feel so connected to tobacco’s history and they felt very strong feelings about that connection. Through this piece of art they kind of reflect on their own history and their working situation. For example, a lot of people have a very close family relationship, memory or even personal memory of it. Also, through this piece they have a new understanding about art. Because these materials have nothing to do with art, after the show they start to see that these materials can be art and have artistic meanings. So they come up to a level where they realize a relationship between art and life, which is hardly something they recognized before.

S: What is your reaction to SCAD MOA, which embodies the same principles of adaptive reuse that infuse your work?

XB: I feel strongly that students really love this environment. For the students and other audiences, SCAD MOA has a strong connection to outdoor spaces, which helps them to share and enjoy art. This should be attributed to the architect who made the original designs, which preserve the original parts of the building. For example, the renovation of the out building creates spaces that are very special. The Poetter Gallery actually benefits contemporary artists who work there because it’s not easy to use. They need to figure out innovative ways to present their art. That’s how they’ll take further steps to develop their art.

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In honor of Fashion Week: career advice from Oscar de la Renta

February
18
2015

The debut of Peter Copping’s first collection as creative director of Oscar de la Renta at New York Fashion Week reminds us of the designer’s timeless advice to students of the industry. During his 2001 visit to Savannah College of Art and Design to accept the André Leon Talley Lifetime Achievement Award, Mr. de la Renta emphasized the importance of fresh ideas. Hear what he shared below and see his philosophy embodied in the exhibition Oscar de la Renta: His Legendary World of Style now through May 3 at SCAD Musuem of Art.

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Loglines from aTVfest 2015

February
13
2015

The star-studded line up of Savannah College of Art and Design’s third annual television festival sent #aTVfest trending. But true to the tag line – Go Behind the Screen - the buzz was as much about the people who make television as it was about the people on it. In addition to the actors, directors, producers, editors, show runners and programmers shared invaluable insights on the state of the industry. Below are some of the recurring themes that emerged from the panels and screenings.

Shows serving up the foreign and the familiar are surging.
Digital is the answer to two seemingly incongruous trends of shows getting simultaneously more personal and unfamiliar. The reason is, unlocked from the vise of linear TV, content is free to speak to narrower audiences. At the same time, the proliferation of content spawned by digital distribution has audiences wanting to go deeper into immersive worlds where they can escape the “noise” and get lost in a rare environment. It’s why Travel Channel greenlit coming of age adventure, "Boy to Man" and why "Game of Thrones" and "Downton Abbey" are favorites.

New technologies complicate workflow but are making content better.
Helping to feed the appetite for more immersive worlds on the small screen is the increasing affordability of visual effects for television. While permitting show creators endless creative freedom, the explosion of new technologies and formats can hamper show delivery and are transforming workflows. This is true of the most sophisticated formats, like Ultra HD, and the most pedestrian, like the refurbished cell phones being used to shoot a show for BET. What is a headache for post supervisors and editors, however, is a bonus for those entering the industry. Easy access to these tools for aspiring producers and editors, and their mastery of them before they get hired, will make it easier for them to land jobs, even while they're still students.

Cord cutters, ‘cord nevers’ and superfans are overthrowing business as usual.
To capture audiences who have never watched or rarely watch linear TV, networks are pulling out all the stops: giving pre-releases to Netflix and Amazon and producing original digital content alongside show content. It’s not just about finding audiences who aren’t watching TV, but about keeping the ones who are in front of the tube longer. So there are new tools in programmers arsenals, like pods of fresh content in the middle of commercials, deep teases, super teases, cliff hangers and marathon viewing. Then there’s the superfans, like "Scandal's" ‘gladiators.’ In the process of using their personal social networks to over share their enthusiasm for certain shows, these viewers become the ultimate brand ambassadors. In return, they expect direct access to the writers, actors and glam squads. More than ratings, social media and word of mouth are so crucial to a show’s success that some networks have added cast member social media classes to their marketing playbooks.

Authenticity is getting more authentic.
Technology like drones and HDR increasingly provide consumers an unrestricted and unfiltered view. Meanwhile, digital has heightened attention to diverse points of view. Both of these realties contribute to an appetite for real perspectives and an environment where TV can help you to truly connect instead of assimilate. So networks are moving away from creating situations to building shows around realities that already exist. This is easiest to see in unscripted programming like HGTV’s hit "Fixer Upper," which takes viewers into the marriage and renovation business of husband and wife team Chip and Joanna Gaines.

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Livestream: aTVfest panel explores the future of television

February
7
2015

On Saturday, February 7 at 11 a.m. EST, watch the aTVfest Television Roundtable live from Atlanta. TV journalists will offer their insight on the state of the industry, including why television is in a golden age, the impact of airing online versus broadcast and cable, their favorite TV shows and more. 

 

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SCAD in and on TV

February
6
2015

Whether on the screen or behind it, above the line or below it, Savannah College of Art and Design alumni are making their mark on television. In honor of aTVfest (Feb. 5 – 7), we scoured our research to show you where. As producers, post supervisors, actors, DPs, art directors, visual effects artists, writers, and more, SCAD alumni are employed by the networks, or productions by the networks, on the map below. Just a snap shot, so that next time you’re watching Game of Thrones, for example, you can say, “Hey, a fellow SCAD grad did that.”

Here’s what a few current students are up to. They screened their projects at the aTVfest Student Showcase, a juried show of assignments completed for visual effects, motion media, TV production and animation classes.

Drag it Out of Me
Brad Schweninger (B.A., TV producing, junior), Producer and Director of Photography

“This documentary short, exploring the drag scene in Atlanta through the eyes of Steven Glen Diehl AKA ‘Biqtch Puddin', was for a field production class. Drag it Out of Me highlights Steven's return to drag after being diagnosed with a rare heart condition. This project represents my interest in being both a producer and director of photography. I want to utilize the skills I learned in the photography department at SCAD and translate them to video production.”

Thread: What do you watch?

Brad: True Detective. I love the cinematic look and editing, absolutely amazing. Plus, who doesn't love Woody and McConaughey?

Man on the Move
David Kim (B.A., TV producing, freshman) Director of Photography

“A professional skate boarder by the name of Preston Pollard shares his story about what he does, what keeps him on the move, and why he loves suiting up. The short film was shown at Benjaminbarker.com and represents my creativity and passion for the world of television. People view television differently because of the lack of control and creativity, compared to film. Through my camera shots, I want show that TV is still a creative job and contribute my unique style.”

Thread: What’s your dream job?

David: To work for National Geographic or Discovery. I want to travel the world and film life events that people normally do not get to see. 

Thread: What do you watch?

David: Frozen Planet, Life, Storm Chasers. These shows inspire me because the effort and time spent filming these animals or storms are incredible. It’s amazing how we get to just simply turn on our TVs or computers to watch something so incredible. By watching these shows I try my best to imitate the shots they get and put my own pieces together.

Upstream Color
Reggie Harrison (M.F.A., advertising, candidate), Cinematography, Editing, Title Design and Color Grading

Music: “That You Would” by Dear Euphoria

"Upstream Color is a science fiction film revolving around a man and a woman whose lives mysteriously become drawn together. The project was completed for the graduate course, Motion Media Cinematography and Editing. The assignment was to re-design the opening titles for the film and defend why the creative direction was taken. My approach for the opening film title sequence was to capture the parasitic aspect of the man and woman’s relationship. I believe in smart storytelling which, to me, means having both a perspective and a curated delivery. This work demonstrates my ability to craft a project that, when given creative freedom, still maintains the integrity of "the ask”; a dynamic that will bode well in the demanding environment of broadcast television."

Thread: What's your dream job?

Reggie: I would like to lead the creative direction of a company’s video production efforts - either as a director or a hands-on executive producer. Those roles allow me to identify an audience and use my talents deliver a message that will resonate well with them.

Thread: What do you watch?

Reggie: I enjoy watching films (independent and mainstream) and shows where the cinematography lends itself almost as a character on its own. Shows like Game of Thrones, Gotham, and True Detective have amazing visuals and shooting techniques that definitely inspire me. Well-executed cinematography generally helps me suspend my disbelief, which makes me that much more invested in the story. That’s an effective tactic and, as an advertising major, strategy is an area where I’m most fluent.

Stay tuned to see where Brad, David and Reggie land on the map.

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The world of Oscar de la Renta opens at SCAD Museum of Art

February
5
2015

Savannah College of Art and Design opened André Leon Talley’s Oscar de la Renta: His Legendary World of Style (Feb. 5 – May 3) with a celebratory preview at SCAD Museum of Art. The fifty gowns, chosen by Talley for the first posthumous show to honor the designer, were the most illustrious VIPs in attendance. The dresses, loaned by Mr. de la Renta’s friends and clients, such as Taylor Swift, Sarah Jessica Parker and First Lady Laura Bush, were poised to show what all know about the designer’s pivotal contributions to the world of fashion:

Oscar de la Renta designed clothes for women who wanted to look and feel beautiful, at their most elegant best. -André Leon Talley  

It’s no wonder, then, that the garments seem to come alive under the gaze of their entranced admirers, and to interact with them in the way that any dignified and gracious woman would.

 

 

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TV set as classroom and other reasons to get into television

February
4
2015

The resurgence of TV is attracting a new generation of talent. Students are increasingly interested in jobs for the small screen, whether they are above or below the line. I tell them it’s a great time to get in, and that chances are good they’ll one day work for the same shows they binge watch. It seems that people used to get into the business because they were well connected, starry eyed, or gluttons for rejection. But the reasons why TV is a great career to shoot for are now better than ever. Here’s a few:

1.) There are more shows than there are staff to produce them.
When I was starting, jobs were scarce, and they were mostly limited to network. Not so today. For example, there are more than 60 network and cable TV shows and films now shooting in New York. This past summer there were 80. In Atlanta, there were 158 film and TV projects shot in 2014 alone, with frequent reports of new productions opening shop. Attached to each of these productions are a myriad of roles and responsibilities that show runners need to fill.

2.) You don’t have to move to New York or Los Angeles.
Seventy five percent of my graduate class moved to LA or New York for work. Now I tell my students to go wherever they have contacts, especially Atlanta, where the opportunities are equal to those in New York and LA. There are big incentives for shows to hire locally, and tax credits aren’t the only ones. I like to hire local crews because they know the area, are well connected and help a show run efficiently. If you build the labor force, the productions will come. Banking on this trend, I recently changed my DGA residency to Savannah believing that more production work will come to the city as the talent pool grows.

3.) New talent can grow with new platforms and content.
Viewers have an appetite for fresh content and for new ways to consume it. With original productions streaming on the likes of Amazon, and cable networks increasingly supplementing unscripted content with scripted, new talent can get in on the ground level of new shows with new forms of distribution and grow with them. Ratings buster Empire or Golden Globe-winning Transparent anyone?

4.) TV teaches on the job.
TV is still an industry that’s willing to teach on the job. We bring in students with little experience, train them in the strange and technical nuances of our business, and hire the promising ones. I placed recent SCAD grad Gabe Gilden as an intern on a Comedy Central pilot. That internship turned into a job as a set PA on Broad City.  Now he’s in the process of joining the DGA Trainee Program. To get there, Gabe had to experience a set and learn what the other 100 crew members do. The beauty is that because he was taught that way, one day Gabe will create opportunities for students, too, and keep the pipeline going.

TV will thrive with a well-trained work force, which will result by expanding pathways between the classroom and the set. The sooner students know what they want to do, the sooner faculty can train them and place them on shows for course credit and real world experience. Such is the case of senior Allie Schultz who, beginning in sophomore year, spent early morning classes repeatedly setting up and breaking down tripods. Her active interest in cinematography landed her at the top of the list we handed the The Walking Dead when producers called SCAD for interns. Later on set, when a camera op threw her the sticks, of course Allie put them up rapidly and evenly, much to the surprise and delight of the harried crew. There are dozens more like her ready to be tested; ready to show the industry that its future is in good hands. And with job prospects looking better than ever, their ranks will grow, starry eyed and business-minded.

Megan Lombardo is an adjunct professor of film and television at Savannah College of Art and Design. Her credits as 1st and 2nd AD include Broad City, airing on Comedy Central, MTV’s Eye Candy, Fox’s Glee and HBO’s VEEP. She holds an M.F.A. in film and television from SCAD.

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The architecture of trade and the 9th Savannah Symposium

February
3
2015

What does Savannah have in common with Hong Kong, Cartagena, Venice and Mumbai?  As a port city, it has long been connected to global trade networks that have existed as long as the oldest human civilizations. Consider a lowly piece of Savannah pavement – a remarkable cobblestone etched with Chinese characters that began its life as a tombstone in China in 1798, became ballast in a ship in the 19th century, and ended up in Savannah as a cobblestone. The story of Savannah’s Chinese cobblestone aptly illustrates the global forces that have directly shaped cities throughout history and around the world.

The cobblestone is the perfect symbol for the 9th Savannah Symposium (Feb. 5 - 7): “The Architecture of Trade.” Since its inception in 1999, the biennial event, presented by Savannah College of Art and Design’s architectural history department, has attracted almost 400 speakers from over 30 countries worldwide, bringing together historians, anthropologists, economists, and sociologists with architects, planners, designers and preservationists to connect history to issues that are relevant today. 

Issues of trade increasingly dominate the news as the forces of globalization, shifting economics, and even the spread of diseases and political radicalism define our lives. Exploring the complex relationship between trade, architecture and cities, “The Architecture of Trade” is particularly timely given Savannah’s rising profile as the nation’s fastest growing port, now the fourth busiest after Los Angeles, Long Beach and New York City.

The 9th symposium will bring 50 speakers from around the United States and from Brazil, Canada, Croatia, Germany, Israel, Italy, and South Africa to Savannah, which shares the history and experiences of other trade centers, but is also an anomaly. Like other port cities around the world, Savannah is preparing for the arrival of the gigantic “post-Panamax” cargo ships in the coming years that will dwarf the current freighters. Yet Savannah also boasts one of the best preserved historic waterfronts, with most of its 19th-century warehouses intact, along with the unique network of masonry retaining walls, terraced lanes (called Factors Walk), and iron bridges.

The symposium leads off with a walking tour of this most extraordinary urban landscape. Also opening the event is the keynote lecture, “Cities of Incense and Myrrh,” given by Dr. Nasser Rabbat, director of the Aga Khan Program in Islamic Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Thematic paper sessions will follow on subjects ranging from the impacts of vast trade networks in past centuries to how trade shapes the built environments of today. The symposium closes with the keynote lecture, “How Capitalism Shaped the Built Environment,” given by Dr. Joyce Appleby, professor emerita of history at the University of California, Los Angeles.

The Savannah Symposium showcases the role SCAD plays in supporting scholarship and contributing to the broader understanding of our world. The lectures, receptions and tours provide valuable opportunities for students, faculty and community members to interact with leading academics and practitioners. Beyond the events, representative papers from the 3rd and 6th symposia have been published as books edited by the department’s faculty – Commemoration in America: Essays on Monuments, Memorialization and Memory, edited by David Gobel and Daves Rossell (University of Virginia Press, 2013), and World Heritage and National Registers: Stewardship in Perspective, edited by Thomas Gensheimer and Celeste Lovette Guichard (Transaction Publishers, 2014). Papers from the 8th symposium will be published in late 2015 in Modernities Across Time and Space: Architecture and History in Context, edited by Patrick Haughey (Cambridge Scholars Publishing).

We invite you to participate. Keynote lectures are free and open to the public, while paper sessions and tours require conference registration.

Robin B. Williams has chaired the SCAD architectural history department since its founding in 1996. He specializes in the history of the built environment of the modern period in Europe and North America.  He earned his B.A. at the University of Toronto and his M.A. and Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania. Since joining SCAD in 1993, Williams has made Savannah the focus of his research, directing the award-winning online Virtual Historic Savannah Project from 1996 to 2005 and is the lead author of a new architectural guidebook, Buildings of Savannah (2015). Read more by Robin here.

 

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The students of Oscar de la Renta

February
2
2015

Legacy can be tangible and intangible. In the case of Oscar de la Renta, it is both, and it is flourishing in a place where young designers begin their careers.

During his 2001 visit to Savannah College of Art and Design’s fashion show to accept the André Leon Talley Lifetime Achievement Award, the designer shared this wisdom for breaking into the industry based on his own start with Cristóbal Balenciaga.

Everyone should seek the opportunity to go somewhere they can work and observe how it happens. - Oscar de la Renta

This is the story of how two industry hopefuls are living that advice and what they learned from hands on experience in Mr. de la Renta’s studio.

A prom dress and a purpose
Nikki Kaia Lee first encountered the tangible aspect of Mr. de la Renta’s legacy as a 14-year-old girl: a beautiful dress the designer chose just for her. This rare gift, which she later wore to prom, was a momento from a special day spent with him in New York. SCAD graduates, whom Nikki met through her mother, a SCAD architecture professor, conspired to bring her to New York as a distraction from cancer treatments. The dream trip grew, and soon insiders like WWD’s Bridget Foley were opening doors to opportunities such as lunch with Mr. de la Renta in his studio. 

I was just this girl from Georgia, but to him it didn’t matter where you come from. He treated everyone with such dignity and respect. - Nikki Kaia Lee

Nikki, now 20 and a junior at SCAD double majoring in fashion design and fibers, learned her first lessons from this dress, fitted for her right there in Mr. de la Renta’s atelier. Its lines, the slight variation in color, the way it made her feel. Her cancer long in remission, Nikki has spent the last four summers as a design intern for Oscar de la Renta in New York. Working in all areas of the studio – including stints with design assistants, in the atelier, and with the embellishment designer – has informed Nikki’s design approach and moved her to pursue a career in textiles. 

What I took from Oscar’s work was how he formed space around the garment. A lot of his garments, especially eveningwear, were like sculptures. -Nikki Kaia Lee

Needless to say, she eagerly awaits the opening of the exhibition, Oscar de la Renta: His Legendary World of Style at SCAD Museum of Art.

I think people have a preconceived notion about fashion. They think it’s frivolous. But I think that when people see his work in person they will truly understand why it can be an art form. - Nikki Kaia Lee

Thanks to the diligence of her fellow fashion student Sloane Mayberry, who is assisting SCAD Trustee André Leon Talley with the exhibition and corresponding catalogue, the public will have this opportunity.

Young hands help surface Oscar de la Renta classics

This summer, Nikki ran into Sloane in the elevators at Oscar de la Renta. Unbeknownst to her, Sloane was a merchandising and buying intern there. Organizing garments, assigning style numbers, and collecting sketches for the ODLR Spring 2015 fashion show put Sloane’s studies in perspective and conditioned her for the rigorous process of bringing the ODLR exhibit to SCAD MOA.

Learning of her internship at the designer's study and with his archive, Mr. Talley tapped Sloane to work on the exhibition. If her long days in New York didn't drive it home, then her apprenticeship on the exhibition did: fashion may be a glamorous, but it is also arduous. As Mr. Talley told her, “Put your gloves on and get to work.” And she did by taking possession of rarely seen couture gowns belonging to Mr. de la Renta’s wife, assisting with the exhibition’s layout and fitting mannequins to Mr. Talley’s specifications.

This project is like a class in itself. I am learning more than I ever thought I possibly could at such a young age, and in such a short amount of time. - Sloane Mayberry

Pouring over lookbooks and canvassing eBay and Google for custom gowns quickly paid off. Sloane’s trained eye prevented a photo of the wrong white jacket, worn by Laura Bush for the 2005 presidential inauguration, from making it into the exhibition. “It’s the pockets,” she observed. They were square.”

Messrs. de la Renta and Talley have taken Sloane a long way away from being that high school student who didn’t know anyone who attended art school. Now her education, reinforced by proximity to fashion legends, has raised her expectations for her career.

I think my exposure to such influential figures in fashion has changed my career path exponentially. This is the best education for what I want to do. - Sloane Mayberry

Along with the exhibition, these students, two paths indelibly changed, would certainly make Mr. de la Renta proud.

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