Working Class Studio debuts Spring 2014 collection

January
6
2014

Emerging from Working Class Studios' prolific design laboratory this week is the Spring 2014 collection of products for the home. Check out the catalog that’s fresh off the presses. Or see these items in person, before they land in stores like Nordstrom, Uncommon Goods, or Smithsonian Gift Shops, at the Atlanta International Gift & Home Furnishings Market (Jan. 7-14), Chicago Market: Living and Giving (Jan. 16-22), Seattle Market Week (Jan. 18-21), or NY Now (Feb. 2-6).

The result of Savannah College of Art and Design artists’ grit and genius, the Working Class Studio collections hold more meaning than most trinkets of a similar function. Here’s a peek at the process and inspiration that contributed to these items coming to kitchen counters, coffee tables, and nightstands throughout the U.S. and abroad soon.

The Katherine Collection Lantern

Katherine Mirabito (B.F.A., Industrial Design)

“I really enjoy knowing that what I design may one day make someone’s day just a little brighter, even if it’s just for an instant.”

 

 

The Yan Collection Lamp

Yan Zhao (M.A., Furniture Design)

“My inspiration came from furniture joints, nature flowers and the golden section shape, which is the shape of the lamp.

MUJI Art Director Kenya Hara’s design philosophy called ‘Emptiness’ also inspires me a lot.”

The Danielle Collection

Danielle Hansen (B.F.A., Fibers)

“While designing my collection, I was focused on Peru, specifically the mountains and plant life. I wanted to take these natural elements and transition them into modern textiles.”

The Eda Collection, Little Red Riding Hood, and Three Little Pigs Placemats

Eda Sy (B.F.A., Graphic Design)

"The Eda Collection is inspired by springtime blooms and the harvest season, where everything is starting to come alive. The Three Little Pigs series is inspired by the popular children's tale. I wanted to tell the story in a new light, but still make it familiar and relatable to people. I broke it down to different characters and materials for the houses, and used these as motifs to create the overall design."


The Lauryn Collection

Lauryn Reiners (B.F.A., Fibers)

“I am a board game fanatic. When we were asked to design a collection of items that would be an ‘impulse buy,’ games immediately came to mind. They're perfect for all ages and you can never have too many. Even better, by screen printing them they become super easy to store, easy to carry, and they have that unique twist WCS is known for.”

 

 

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"Look Inside" to win $100k

December
20
2013

The acres of art and design on display at Art Basel Miami Beach was mind numbing. By day three, I’d slipped into a bit of an art coma until the news that Savannah College of Art and Design alumna Whitney Stansell (M.F.A., Painting) and her husband Micah Stansell hit a veritable ABMB lottery jarred me from my stupor. The $100K prize they pocketed, though, wasn’t due to luck, but the barrel, yes, barrel, they tricked out for Herradura Tequila’s Barrel Art Collection contest.

Hint: their winning entry proves the well quoted adage that ‘what’s on the inside matters more than what’s on the outside.’ Or, I might add, that the work matters more than the canvas.

To start, this was one of 80 plain oak barrels – used for aging tequila – that Herradura dispatched around the country to be transformed by local artists. A list of 77 participating artists was honed to 8 finalists, including Whitney and Micah, who were invited to Miami for a grand finale party created by Thrillist Media with the help of event producer Adrienne Wright (B.F.A., Fashion).

Here’s the artist's statement on the barrel "Look Inside":

"Though a 150-pound tequila barrel is not our usual medium, we set about the process of 'making art' in our usual way; anthropologically. We considered the barrel not just as an aesthetic object, but as a utilitarian one; an object with a particular historical purpose. Here we struck upon the idea to use the inside of the barrel, leaving the outside of the barrel unchanged save for a marquee sign with a simple call to action: 'look inside'.”

"We’ve created a zoetrope, an early 'cinema' device, inside the barrel. The running horse pays homage to Muybridge, a pioneer of the moving image, and the marquee sign and the act of peering into the barrel are a nod to the kinetoscope/mutoscope. Early alchemists believed the distilling of 'spirits' to be magic. In the same way, early cinema devices like the zoetrope were used to conjure spirits and were presented as magical objects. We think there’s still something pretty magical about the inside of our Herradura barrel. Look inside and see for yourself."

So what will they do with the money? Here's what Whitney had to say on bringing that fat check back to their home in Atlanta:

"It's hard to overstate what one hundred thousand dollars means to a working artist. I think more than anything it carries with it a feeling of freedom. The sense that we are free to continue making art on our own terms. Maybe the less-than-glamorous truth is that this prize, in a way, is a return on more than ten years of investing in our art (and much of it will go to servicing debt from many of those past projects and student loans!). Likewise, it's equally hard to overstate what it means for a company to invest in artists in this way. For Herradura to stand up and say, 'We think that art and artists are important and we're going to put a significant and substantial amount of money behind that belief,' is incredibly encouraging to a talented group of artists. A heartfel thank you to all of those involved in in administering this prize."

I think more than anything it carries with it a feeling of freedom. The sense that we are free to continue making art on our own terms.

I'd say that's enough incentive to always look a little closer, and not to be afraid to take a different approach.

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Immersion Hong Kong: a 20-day tour of the city's architectural gems

December
16
2013

In case you’re stuck somewhere cold, snowy, uninspired, or all of the above, here’s some eye candy that’ll whisk you away on a virtual, albeit momentary, adventure.

The images come from 18 graduate and undergraduate students from Savannah College of Art and Design's School of Building Arts who are traversing Hong Kong in search of the neighborhoods, architecture, and urban design that make it one of the world’s great cities.

Hong Kong's historic and modern culture provides students with rich perspectives of Chinese architecture, social and political influences in its urban design and architecture. - Hsu-Jen Huang, Professor of Architecture

These postcards and excerpts from the travel-study itinerary document the field trips and assignments the students have participated in since arriving in Hong Kong. SCAD Hong Kong's location in the North Kowloon Magistracy Building has not only provided a welcoming home base, but a context for understanding development and preservation in Asia at large.

Day 1: Arrival in Hong Kong.

Day 2: Orientation and first class meeting at SCAD Hong Kong, then dinner with SCAD architecture alumni representing Handel Architects, Marc & Chantal Design, Aedas and Pleasanthouse Architects.

Day 3: Chungking Mansions site visit followed by a walking tour of the Tsim Sha Tsui Promenade and the Hong Kong Museum of Art.

Day 4: Fa Yuen Street Market, Ladies Market and Jade Market.

Day 5: Field trip to Macau and the Ruins of St. Paul's Cathedral.

Day 8: Firm visit at Foster + Partners. Meetings with local residents, preservationists and firms give students a taste of what it’s like to be engaged in a global practice. Then a stop at Kowloon Walled City and a discussion of the Kai Tak Airport redevelopment site.

Day 10: The pier at Cheung Chau Island.

Day 13: At the Hong Kong Maritime Museum, students pitch in and help the American Institute of Architects teach architectural sketching for the Draw Together Hong Kong event, which teaches participants how cities develop through observation and the resulting drawings.

Day 11: A field trip to Tian Tan Buddha.

For more photos follow SCAD Architecture on Instagram, #immersionhongkong.

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Holiday shopping with Kickstarter

December
13
2013

If the season of giving and holiday movies has you under its spell, head on over to the Kickstarter page for student film, Sea Odyssey, where you can indulge your appetite for both. Sea Odyssey won’t be out in time for Christmas, more like May 2014. But by pledging to support the short film, you'll score an inventive and charitable gift for someone special, and put into motion a project that has grabbed the attention and participation of award-winning visual effects company Fugo Studios.

The internship for high school students in Sea Odyssey's art department (donation $150) has my sister’s name written all over it. The DVD of the father-son themed flick (donation $25) are perfect for dad and brother. You have until Dec. 17 to nab these gifts and bragging rights to launching an inspiring indie film.

Learn more about Sea Odyssey and writer-director Adam Nelson (candidate for a B.F.A. in Film and Television) below. The Atlanta Film Festival (March 28-April 6) is touting Adam as a model for emerging filmmakers on its own Kickstarter page, which features more great gift ideas. Um, honey, that tour of Atlanta movie sets (donation $150) is right up my alley.

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On the trail of SCAD artists at ABMB

December
7
2013

Dotting the massive and brilliant landscape of Art Basel Miami Beach and surrounding fairs are the bright lights of artists who have studied or exhibited at Savannah College of Art and Design. Whether you’re in Miami or following the fairs from afar, here’s a guide to their piece of the action.

At SCOPE, Eileen Braziel Gallery is showing Marcus Kenney (M.F.A., Photography) taxidermy in a booth that previews the artist’s upcoming collaboration and exhibition with artists from the Navajo Nation. Marcus is also showing at North of Modern, presented by Florida Mining Gallery.

In a neighboring booth, Elizabeth Winnel’s (B.F.A., Illustration; M.F.A., Painting) work is featured in curator Lori Zimmer’s project Message in a Bottle. Elizabeth’s captivating vessels are coming soon to ShopSCAD, where you’ll be able to collect one of your very own.

Though showing at SCOPE, Elizabeth’s days are filled with NADA, hosted by the New Art Dealer’s Alliance. Elizabeth nabbed a gig as a floor manager for the fair after reuniting with Charlotte Walters (B.F.A., Photography), one of NADA’s two fair managers. Charlotte, who manages the domestic dealers showing at NADA, has her hands full year-round with fairs in Miami, Cologne and New York, but also works in her craft by officially documenting the fair through photography.

Joining Elizabeth and Charlotte, also as a floor manager at NADA, is SCAD senior Kyle Joseph, candidate for a B.F.A. in painting.

The three regularly pass by the booth of American Contemporary Gallery and the work of Mariah Robertson, who previously exhibited at SCAD Museum of Art

Further down Collins Avenue, on the beach at UNTITLED., you’ll find Mary Lum and Dario Robleto, whose work has also graced the galleries of SCAD MOA.

In the same corridor at UNTITLED. hangs Tony Orrico’s Penwald: 4. Tony will be featured at SCAD deFINE ART in February.

Showing both at UNTITLED. with Anna Kustera Gallery and at the M Building, Wendy White (B.F.A., Fibers) has tread the well worn path between the beach and her exhibition, CURVA, in Wynwood.

Please keep us posted on the SCAD treasures you find along the way.

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CURVA: In Wendy Whites' Adidas

December
6
2013

Donning her signature shoes, whose iconic stripes are prominently referenced along the borders of her work, Wendy White (B.F.A., Fibers) took visitors through the logic of CURVA. The exhibit opened this week at the M Building in Miami with a VIP preview that was attended by hundreds of connoisseurs of contemporary art, Art Basel attendees, and Wendy’s fellow alumni from Savannah College of Art and Design. CURVA will remain on display through Dec. 20.

The five pieces that compose CURVA seamlessly blend the boundaries between art and sport, between fine and urban art. Here, Wendy describes why sport, and soccer in particular, served as the impetus for collection.

Wendy on why she incorporates the Adidas stripe as a frame.

A soccer ball conspicuously hangs from the edge of Tietz. Wendy uses the structural element to connote pace and movement.

Using Green Brigade, which evokes the atmosphere created by the fierce rivalry between Scottish teams the Rangers and the Celtics, as an example, Wendy explains her use of photography.

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Get on the bus: free shuttle from Wynwood to Art Basel Miami Beach

November
29
2013

Here’s a peek from concept through production of the bus Savannah College of Art and Design is exporting to Art Basel Miami Beach. The complimentary shuttle will run Dec. 4-8 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and transport riders from UNTITLED. Miami Beach (bus stop located at 10th Street and Ocean Drive) and The M Building (194 NW 30th Street), home to Wendy White: CURVA, in the Wynwood Art District.

It took three days to wrap the vehicle in the vibrant paintings of Xiaolu Zhang (M.F.A., Painting) and the bright magenta that’s sure to catch a few stares along the 6-mile loop between Wynwood and Ocean Drive.

Every inch of the shuttle was covered, even the roof, where one last portrait will give airborne enthusiasts, and the many helicopters that are sure to be circling, a focal point.

Let’s just call this an Art Basel debut for Xiaolu’s ‘Little Evils’ series, which harkens back to a time before life became too serious. The perfect tenor, I'd say, for ABMB.

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Video: Lee Daniels' commencement address at Savannah College of Art and Design

November
24
2013

Yesterday, Academy Award-winning director and producer Lee Daniels delivered the commencement address at SCAD's very first fall commencement ceremony in Savannah. Lee told graduates and their families, “I couldn’t afford to go to college and I was angry about that for a long time. This would have been the college that I went to because it’s pretty badass.” SCAD awarded Lee the Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters.

 

 

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SCAD teams with Hewlett Packard to create field trip of the future

November
20
2013

In a world of devices and screens of every variety, it’s easy to wonder, do we really need paper? Hewlett Packard recently turned to students and the Collaborative Learning Center at Savannah College of Art and Design to help them answer that question in the affirmative.

On the first day of fall quarter, Hewlett Packard came to Savannah to invite the help of the very demographic that’s using less and less paper in their every day lives. Rather than fear these millennials, HP asked students from SCAD’s advertising, graphic design and illustration programs, among others, to help them bring paper to life using their free augmented reality app, Aurasma.

In turn, the SCAD students enlisted a generation even younger than they - third and fifth graders from May Howard Elementary School - to test whether paper, spruced up with digital qualities, can win over young attention spans.

Using the Aurasma app, the SCAD students created the interactive Passport to Nature tour of animal exhibits at Oatland Island Wildlife Center. At each stop, the elementary students collected a stamp created by scientific illustrator and graphic designer Grace Washko (B.F.A., Illustration) to put in a passport conceived and designed especially for this purpose by Shaun Oppedisano (B.A., Advertising) and Brenna Kaplan (B.F.A., Graphic Design).

Once inside their passport, the students could scan the sticker with an iPad or other smart device to yield a digital experience called an Aura. Complete with videos, produced by Andrew Lainhart (B.F.A., Film and Television) and statistics about the animal’s diet and habits, for example, the Aura contained information that the students might not have been able to gather from the exhibit itself.

What was the verdict?

Suffice it to say that the experience managed to impress the group, many of whom probably mastered a screen swipe before they could walk. According to one third grader, Aurasma made the trip to Oatland Island Wildlife Center, “more funner.” Doesn't get more honest than that. They’ll probably never look at a field trip the same way again. If only homework could be this cool.

Oatland Island Wildlife Center is researching how to implement the Passport to Nature Program permanently.

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DesignIntelligence’s 2014 rankings name SCAD interior design #1

November
12
2013

For the third year in a row, DesignIntelligence has ranked Savannah College of Art and Design's graduate and undergraduate interior design programs number one in the nation.

Leading professionals and educators determine “America’s Best Architecture & Design Schools.” SCAD’s close relationship to industry and unique interdisciplinary environment are two factors that keep its programs at the top of the list.

Interior design students who study at SCAD benefit from exposure to more than 40 degree programs and the Collaborative Learning Center, through which they solve real-world design challenges for major corporations and brands.

In one of the first such partnerships between SCAD and industry, for example, interior design students worked directly with Benetton and their North American staff to design a new flagship store for the retailer. The students tapped the university's graphic design, advertising, fashion and marketing management, architecture, furniture design, and service design programs to present Benetton with plans for a retail store of the future.

In an increasingly competitive economy where the demand for skilled talent is high, these projects give students an edge, especially within a multi-disciplinary profession like interior design. The result is a success story for higher education and employment for a new generation of designers.

Ninety percent of students who graduated from SCAD’s interior design program in Spring 2012 reported that they were employed or pursuing further education within nine months of graduating.

A few recent projects by SCAD faculty and the 1,500 alumni of SCAD’s interior design program:

Restoration of Gritti Palace in Venice, Italy by Chuck Chewning.

New Balance Experience Store in Boston, Massachusetts by Nikole Nelson.

Nectar Skin Bar in Washington, D.C. by William McGovern.

Celebrity Cruise's Sky Observation Lounge by Professor Charles Boggs.

Gulfstream's 9,300 square-foot sales and design center in Dallas, Texas by Tray Crow.

SCAD will celebrate its number one ranking tomorrow with events in Savannah and Atlanta.

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