Courses

Writing

Courses

100 Level

  • WRIT 177 Nonfiction Writing I
     

    WRIT 177

    Nonfiction Writing I
    Through workshops, draft revisions and analysis of major nonfiction prose writers, this course covers basic techniques in nonfiction. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.

200 Level

  • WRIT 205 Writing for the Arts
     

    WRIT 205

    Writing for the Arts
    By exploring various styles and genres of writing that are commonly used in the art world, students learn about writing for the arts including how to write grants, find appropriate funding sources, work with commercial exhibitions, catalogue work and compose short bibliographies of artists. Students also write articles in the style of contemporary art journals and engage in peer collaborations. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • WRIT 210 Promotional Writing
     

    WRIT 210

    Promotional Writing
    In this applied course with a broad immersion into the study and practice of promotion management, students develop and write a complete promotion plan, which includes a press release, press kit and brochure. Through a variety of written and oral communication exercises, students develop their communications skills to better promote themselves and their work. Topics covered include the study of promotional positioning strategies, promotion tool development and creation, event planning and measuring promotional effectiveness. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • WRIT 219 News Writing and Editing
     

    WRIT 219

    News Writing and Editing
    Through lectures, workshops and discussion, students focus on the skills of news reporting and editing, including the ethical aspects involved in journalism. Students discuss the media coverage of contemporary news stories, participate in group brainstorming meetings to generate story ideas and experiment with workshop-style critique sessions. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • WRIT 220 Writing for the Web
     

    WRIT 220

    Writing for the Web
    In today’s Internet-dominated society, people ascertain much of their information from the Web. To improve the readability of Web materials, writers must understand and gain confidence in using this form of communication. In this course, students enhance their knowledge of writing in a scannable format, as well as other writing and editing techniques that enable them to compete in the world of online publications and services. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • WRIT 255 Business and Professional Writing Course is available via eLearning
     

    WRIT 255

    Business and Professional Writing
    Course is available via eLearning
    Workplace writing—including memos, proposals, pamphlets and instructions—is examined and practiced in this introductory course. Students gain real-world writing experiences that help prepare them for the professional world. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • WRIT 277 Nonfiction Writing II
     

    WRIT 277

    Nonfiction Writing II
    This course offers an intense focus for students interested in publishing their work, covering elements of nonfiction writing such as tone, unity and thematic development. Students produce manuscripts for group readings. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 177.

300 Level

  • WRIT 315 Approaches to Historical Fiction and Historical Nonfiction
     

    WRIT 315

    Approaches to Historical Fiction and Historical Nonfiction
    From Nobel Prize-winner Ivo Andric's "The Bridge on the Drina" to Erik Larson's "The Devil in the White City," students explore critical elements within the long forms of fiction and nonfiction. They master time and place as character, the symphonic quality of structure, and the notion that research must be fluid in order to follow the dictates of narrative. They also learn how to position their own writing within the publishing marketplace. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 177.
  • WRIT 320 The Art of Story Writing
     

    WRIT 320

    The Art of Story Writing
    From religious texts to fairy tales, students explore the central elements of story writing. Using imitative techniques, they master narrative drive, character development, cadence and other essential components of story writing. They are then able to use these techniques to enhance any kind of writing in any field of study. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • WRIT 322 Writing About Place
     

    WRIT 322

    Writing About Place
    This course focuses on two genres of writing that both encompass the idea of “place,” our natural environment and the environment of culture. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 124.  
  • WRIT 350 Writing the Critical Review
     

    WRIT 350

    Writing the Critical Review
    Contemporary writing must include the art of criticism in all fields studied at SCAD. Magazines, newspapers, online ‘zines, TV and radio reviews, publishers’ and liner notes, as well as websites and blogs, demand of the writer a sharp critical faculty and the ability to put critical thought into words. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 177.
  • WRIT 355 Writing and New Media I
     

    WRIT 355

    Writing and New Media I
    As ease of production, storage and distribution of information increases, opportunities exist for writing in new media venues, including the personal computer, computer networks, digital mobile devices and virtual realities. From the everyday to the unusual, this course examines all aspects of new media and the related writing processes. Students explore the history of new media and gain experience writing about new media and writing with new media tools and technologies. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 219 or WRIT 220.
  • WRIT 377 Nonfiction Writing III
     

    WRIT 377

    Nonfiction Writing III
    Primarily for writing minors, this course helps students polish their work for publication, providing advanced training in techniques of nonfiction writing through workshops and revisions. Students produce work for a public forum. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 277.

400 Level

  • WRIT 410 Literary Journalism
     

    WRIT 410

    Literary Journalism
    This course uses fiction-writing techniques to tell nonfiction stories. Students review the history of this new, exciting and popular genre by reading the work of its most accomplished writers. Students research their topics, conduct successful interviews and structure the information they have gathered into compelling narratives. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 177.
  • WRIT 420 Forms in Creative Nonfiction
     

    WRIT 420

    Forms in Creative Nonfiction
    From the essays of Montaigne to contemporary literary journalism, students explore creative nonfiction while developing criteria from which to understand this genre's historical path to today's "best-seller" status. Focus is placed on the rich literary, critical and philosophical issues inherent to creative nonfiction. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level WRIT course.
  • WRIT 425 Autobiography and Memoir
     

    WRIT 425

    Autobiography and Memoir
    This course focuses on writing autobiography and memoir. Students hone their use of characterization, setting, symbolism and metaphor and explore opportunities to publish their work. Students read seminal primary and secondary texts that span the 18th through 21st centuries as well as critical assessments of autobiography. The issues of genre, gender and self representation are explored, as are modern variations of the autobiographical text, such as blogs and personal webpages. Prerequisite(s):   Any 300-level WRIT course.
  • WRIT 430 Media Ethics
     

    WRIT 430

    Media Ethics
    Students examine established theories of ethical reasoning and learn how to evaluate potential ethical problems in the fields of print, broadcast and Web journalism, advertising, and public relations. Through lectures, workshops, group projects and discussions, students learn how to apply those theories in various scenarios. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 210 or WRIT 220.
  • WRIT 435 Visiting Writer
     

    WRIT 435

    Visiting Writer
    Taught by both a visiting writer and a SCAD faculty member, this course is organized around expertise of the visiting writer.  Students read and discuss the visiting author's work and other works in this genre. Through workshops, writing exercises and discussions, students work with the visiting writer to expand their writing portfolio, learn about their writing process and explore different genres of writing. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level WRIT course.
  • WRIT 440 Genre Literature
     

    WRIT 440

    Genre Literature
    This course surveys a range of contemporary literature outside of the conventional scope. Students engage in critical readings of major writers from horror, fantasy, romance, mystery, thriller, science fiction and other often marginalized genres. When appropriate, students examine how those stories have been retold or reevaluated in other media, such as film, art, photography, online media or television. Students also write their own works of genre fiction. Prerequisite(s): CREA 262.
  • WRIT 445 Writing About Design
     

    WRIT 445

    Writing About Design
    Students apply a systematic approach to critical writing about design: They learn to see critically, evaluate merits and articulate an original point of view in a persuasive piece using evidence to support their positions. Through critiques, close study of successful design writing and interaction with established writers, students learn to pitch, write and revise articles and essays to connect with the audience they seek. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123, junior or senior status.
  • WRIT 455 Writing and New Media II
     

    WRIT 455

    Writing and New Media II
    In this course, students explore some of the more sophisticated elements of new media including tech journalism and instructional design. Students continue to examine the ethical and cultural implications of new media and analyze current theories associated with the creation and use of new media. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 355.
  • WRIT 480 Writing Portfolio
     

    WRIT 480

    Writing Portfolio
    This course focuses on portfolios and their place in the world of writing. Each student creates a portfolio that focuses on a specific area of interests dictated by the student's individual career goals. Lectures, readings and field trips help prepare students for professional writing situations. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 355.
  • WRIT 495 Special Topics in Writing
     

    WRIT 495

    Special Topics in Writing
    The topic of this course varies from quarter to quarter. Each seminar focuses on various issues in the field of professional writing and allows students to pursue individual projects related to the subject of the course. Prerequisite(s): Vary according to topic.

700 Level

  • WRIT 703 Writing for New Media Course is available via eLearning
     

    WRIT 703

    Writing for New Media
    Course is available via eLearning
    Students examine the development of new media; explore its theoretical, social and practical implications; and examine new media through and relative to the writing process in order to understand and communicate ideas using new media and technology.
  • WRIT 705 Techniques of Fiction
     

    WRIT 705

    Techniques of Fiction
    By learning techniques in storytelling, characterization, scene-building and point of view, students develop their fiction-writing skills. Students learn from being exposed to the work of major fiction writers as well as from engaging in constructive critiques of each other's fiction in workshops.  
  • WRIT 706 The Analysis and Criticism of Short Fiction
     

    WRIT 706

    The Analysis and Criticism of Short Fiction
    Students study the history of short fiction as a genre, analyze diverse theoretical points of view as they pertain to short fiction, assess the range of publishing opportunities available in print and online, and practice the art of short fiction review and criticism.     
  • WRIT 707 The Art of the Sentence
     

    WRIT 707

    The Art of the Sentence
    When a young writing student asked Annie Dillard if she thought he was really a writer, Annie Dillard asked him in return, "Do you love sentences?" Focusing on sentence-level writing increases the vigor, nuance and variety of writers' sentences, making their work more readable, enjoyable and persuasive. By studying basic sentence structures, practicing ancient Greek literary tropes and reading models by literature's greatest sentence writers, students learn to multiply the types and styles of sentences available to them.
  • WRIT 713 Nonfiction I Course is available via eLearning
     

    WRIT 713

    Nonfiction I
    Course is available via eLearning
    In this course, students work on their essays or chapters of a nonfiction work. Their efforts are developed towards mastery of their own writing style. Students also present and discuss their works in the classroom environment.
  • WRIT 723 Nonfiction II Course is available via eLearning
     

    WRIT 723

    Nonfiction II
    Course is available via eLearning
    Students in this course continue to work on their essays or chapters and themes from Nonfiction I. Activities include furthering previous works in nonfiction as a way to develop mastery in their own idiom. This course enables students to work toward a book-length, publishable manuscript; a collection of essay; or a thesis. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 713.
  • WRIT 725 Persuasive Writing
     

    WRIT 725

    Persuasive Writing
    This course approaches persuasive writing as an essential complement to visual forms such as advertising design. It also explores the deconstruction of written expression associated with advertising, design and promotion embodied in copywriting for visually creative scenarios.
  • WRIT 735 Visiting Writer
     

    WRIT 735

    Visiting Writer
    Taught by a visiting writer and a SCAD faculty member, this course is organized around expertise of the visiting writer. Students analyze and critique the visiting author's work and other works in this genre and apply various theoretical concepts to this work. Through workshops, writing exercises and discussions, the visiting writer guides the students towards an understanding of the connections between idea, narrative technique, form and process in their individual work. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.
  • WRIT 740 Alternative Literature
     

    WRIT 740

    Alternative Literature
    Students engage in critical readings and analytical discussions of major writers from horror, fantasy, romance, mystery, thriller, science fiction and other often marginalized genres. Students examine how these stories have been retold or re-evaluated in other media, discuss varying theoretical approaches to each genre, and learn about the historical and cultural contexts. Students write multiple works of fiction and demonstrate mastery in several alternative genres.
  • WRIT 743 Business and Professional Writing Course is available via eLearning
     

    WRIT 743

    Business and Professional Writing
    Course is available via eLearning
    Students in this course learn the skills necessary to communicate effectively, professionally and persuasively to a wide variety of workplace audiences. Students gain experience creating various workplace documents including proposals, reports and procedures as well as typical forms of business correspondence such as letters and memos. Collaboration, communicating ethically and communicating with international audiences also are stressed.
  • WRIT 744 Writing the First Chapter in Fiction or Nonfiction
     

    WRIT 744

    Writing the First Chapter in Fiction or Nonfiction
    Graduate work in starting one’s first novel or work of nonfiction provides intensive focus on the first chapter—the foundation of all large works—and how to get started on one’s graduate thesis material.
  • WRIT 753 Freelance Writing for Publication
     

    WRIT 753

    Freelance Writing for Publication
    Course topics include writing query letters, proposals, conducting interviews and writing for journalism and narrative style nonfiction. Every activity within this course is intended to expose the student to potential markets that a freelance writer can pursue while negotiating the realities of the publication industry.
  • WRIT 763 The Publishing Process Course is available via eLearning
     

    WRIT 763

    The Publishing Process
    Course is available via eLearning
    Graduate work in this course includes writing query letters and formal book proposals, submitting work to outside editors and working in an editorial setting in the classroom. Workshops are conducted as editorial meetings, with agendas, focus and critique.
  • WRIT 773 Promotional Writing
     

    WRIT 773

    Promotional Writing
    Students are immersed into the study and practice of promotional writing. Students develop and write a complete promotion plan, which includes a press release, press kit and brochure writing. Topics covered include the study of promotional strategies, promotion tool development and creation, event planning and measuring promotion effectiveness. Communications skills both oral and written are required of successful business people; one of the purposes of the course is to sensitize students to the importance of good communication skills. Therefore, students do a variety of written and oral communication exercises. Promotional writing helps secure publicity and clients for artists and art businesses, improving prospects, sales and awareness. Students adopt a local non-SCAD arts business, apply promotional principles, create promotional materials and present results. Prerequisite(s): WRIT 725.
  • WRIT 779F Graduate Field Internship
     

    WRIT 779F

    Graduate Field Internship
    Students in this course undertake a field assignment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good academic standing.
  • WRIT 779T Graduate Teaching Internship
     

    WRIT 779T

    Graduate Teaching Internship
    Students in this course undertake a teaching assignment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good academic standing.
  • WRIT 780 Special Topics in Writing
     

    WRIT 780

    Special Topics in Writing
    Working with faculty advisers, students pursue a writing project of particular interest and significance. Students must present a proposal supported by research for approval. The course involves group instruction and critiques as well as individual projects.
  • WRIT 790 Writing M.F.A. Thesis
     

    WRIT 790

    Writing M.F.A. Thesis
    Students enrolled in the M.F.A. program in writing are required to complete a thesis demonstrating knowledge of forms and the history of their discipline, as well as professional writing skills. Students work with their faculty adviser throughout the process of thesis completion. Prerequisite(s): Completion of the review for candidacy.