Courses

Jewelry

Courses

100 Level

  • MTJW 102 Introduction to Jewelry
     

    MTJW 102

    Introduction to Jewelry
    Students are introduced to a range of basic techniques, materials and processes within the broad historical and social context of jewelry and metalworking. Students explore these processes and develop a foundation of basic skills by creating jewelry and small scale objects. Prerequisite(s): DRAW 100, DSGN 102.

200 Level

  • MTJW 202 Form and Inspiration for Jewelry
     

    MTJW 202

    Form and Inspiration for Jewelry
    Students are encouraged to identify the sources of their work and, using techniques mastered from previous courses, are required to develop a range of forms and processes that apply to project parameters or an enhanced personal vision. Students are expected to demonstrate a focused, conscious, consistent and, therefore, more productive design process. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 102.
  • MTJW 225 Studio Practice I: Design and Fabrication
     

    MTJW 225

    Studio Practice I: Design and Fabrication
    This course continues to develop skills and techniques used in the fabrication of jewelry and metal as an art form. Students complete projects that refine existing competencies and introduce new techniques for constructing jewelry and functional objects. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 102.
  • MTJW 235 Idea Visualization for Jewelry Design
     

    MTJW 235

    Idea Visualization for Jewelry Design
    The concentration of this course is the development of the drawing skills and 2-D presentation techniques for the jewelry design profession. Lectures, in-class workshops and assigned classwork equip students with a variety of approaches applicable to visual and structural solutions. The construction of perspective view, quick and accurate sketching ability, line weight and value are among topics covered. Prerequisite(s): DRAW 230.
  • MTJW 245 CAD and RP for Jewelry Design
     

    MTJW 245

    CAD and RP for Jewelry Design
    This course introduces students to the use of three-dimensional computer aided design software and rendering software to accurately communicate jewelry oriented form. Students utilize rapid prototyping equipment to translate their digital designs to tangible objects. Prerequisite(s): CMPA 100 or CMPA 110, MTJW 102.
  • MTJW 255 Studio Practice II: Content and Context
     

    MTJW 255

    Studio Practice II: Content and Context
    Emphasis of this course includes wax working, light metal casting, forming, advance metal fabrication and its application to jewelry and small objects design. Students design and execute complex jewelry and small objects that may incorporate both metal and alternative materials. Students individualize design methodologies and thinking strategies that reflect appropriate application of material and process with regard to contemporary trends and historical context. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 225, MTJW 245.

300 Level

  • MTJW 301 Enameling
     

    MTJW 301

    Enameling
    This course introduces the process of enameling on metal. This medium is viewed in its historic context and applied to the individual student’s personal focus in jewelry and related metal objects. Students have the opportunity to gain proficiency through studio experience with emphasis placed on contemporary use and interpretation. Topics addressed may include cloisonné, champlevé, plique-à-jour, Limoges, graffito, use of foils and metal techniques for fabrication as they apply to enamels and enameling. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 225.
  • MTJW 304 Rendering for Jewelry Design
     

    MTJW 304

    Rendering for Jewelry Design
    This course provides instruction in rendering jewelry designs in a realistic manner, thereby allowing the production of professional, high quality jewelry designs for manufacturers, individual clients and/or presentation in corporate industry. Emphasis is placed on drawing to develop design concepts, finding solutions and communication. Students render in various mediums to clearly represent the material and its surface finish. Students incorporate 2-D and 3-D computer software to enhance renderings. Students learn the design development process to design jewelry and decorative objects. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 235.  
  • MTJW 306 Adornment, Identity and the Power of Jewelry
     

    MTJW 306

    Adornment, Identity and the Power of Jewelry
    Jewelry has powerful communicative aspects and is integral to cultural self expression. This course focuses on the evolution of adornment and the symbolic and social significance of jewelry. Additional studies examine the ways in which materials and techniques influence meaning. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123, MTJW 255.
  • MTJW 308 Eyewear Design
     

    MTJW 308

    Eyewear Design
    This course introduces students to strategies for designing eyewear. Students conduct contextual research to support their eyewear designs. They are introduced to the materials and processes needed to develop eyewear models and prototypes. Strategies for communicating manufacture and commercial production of eyewear are also explored. Prerequisite(s): ACCE 203 or FASH 220 or FURN 232 or IDUS 213 or MTJW 304.
  • MTJW 310 Light Metal Casting
     

    MTJW 310

    Light Metal Casting
    This course introduces lost wax casting and its application to the design and production of jewelry and small art metal forms. Students use a variety of waxes as well as the tools and techniques necessary to develop and execute models for successful casting. Topics include model moldmaking, wax injection and related applications of production processes. Casting, fabrication and design techniques are employed together to achieve unified work. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 245, MTJW 255.
  • MTJW 311 Stone Setting
     

    MTJW 311

    Stone Setting
    This course provides a thorough understanding of the technical principles of stone setting as applicable to jewelry. Students produce examples of commercial variations applied in the contemporary jewelry market. After completing intensive exercises, students execute a completed piece with a stone-set detail. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 255.
  • MTJW 312 Jewelry and Fashion
     

    MTJW 312

    Jewelry and Fashion
    This studio course explores jewelry and its role in fashion. Emphasis is placed on jewelry innovation and the exploration of concept design in the fashion jewelry industry. These explorations lead to the development of designs and prototypes for a new collection. Prerequisite(s): CMPA 100 or CMPA 110 or ELDS 205 or ELDS 225, MTJW 102.
  • MTJW 314 Historic Processes for Functional Objects
     

    MTJW 314

    Historic Processes for Functional Objects
    Historically relevant processes are investigated and practiced within a studio context. Students learn to respond individually to process outcomes and build an aesthetic vocabulary commensurate with traditions in the jewelry and metalsmithing discipline. Processes may include chasing/repoussé and tool making, keum-boo, granulation, mokume-gane, reticulation, filigree and fusing, or engraving and inlay. The course stresses contemporary design, individual expression and development of personal methodology. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 306.
  • MTJW 315 Electrochemical Processes for Jewelry and Objects Studio
     

    MTJW 315

    Electrochemical Processes for Jewelry and Objects Studio
    Electro-chemical processes, including electroplating, electro-forming and anodizing, are introduced from the perspective of selection, application and execution for optimal utilization affecting the aesthetics of surface and form. The course stresses discussion of the basic chemistry and physics involved and safe handling of materials and equipment. Utilization of electro-chemical processes and control of variables are applied to specific studio problems, including models, commercial prototypes and fine art pieces. Studio results are critically examined and evaluated. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 255.
  • MTJW 316 Metalsmithing
     

    MTJW 316

    Metalsmithing
    Students are introduced to metalsmithing tools and techniques used in the development and execution of hammer-formed pieces to create objects and prototypes that are functional or decorative. Emphasizing conceptualization to realization, students hone model-making and drawing skills as creative problem-solving techniques for working with 3-D forms. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 225, MTJW 235.
  • MTJW 325 Studio Practice III: Materials, Processes and Creative Solutions
     

    MTJW 325

    Studio Practice III: Materials, Processes and Creative Solutions
    Students in this course identify the sources of their work. They develop a range of forms and processes that apply to resolving a set problem. Students document this in a technical journal that demonstrates a focused, conscious, consistent and, therefore, more productive design process. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 255, MTJW 304.  
  • MTJW 330 Working with Gold and Platinum
     

    MTJW 330

    Working with Gold and Platinum
    This course explores the unique characteristics of gold and platinum. Development of technical skills and appropriate application to design problems are addressed. Students produce professional-quality work. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 255, MTJW 304.
  • MTJW 345 Digital Jewelry Studio
     

    MTJW 345

    Digital Jewelry Studio
    This course is intended for students to gain a more in-depth knowledge and practice of Rhinoceros software introduced in CAD/RP. This course focuses on the advanced application of various digital modeling software and rapid prototyping processes to build industry-standard models. Emphasis is placed on proficiency of accurate and transformable visualization of designs to communicate between designer, product developer and client. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 225, MTJW 245.
  • MTJW 355 Portfolio Development
     

    MTJW 355

    Portfolio Development
    Refined portfolio and presentation strategies are crucial for securing internship and employment opportunities. This course serves as a forum to discuss and prepare for the concerns of the professional world. Topics include résumés, cover letters, portfolio preparation and interview/presentation skills. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 304, MTJW 325.
  • MTJW 360 Innovations in Studio Practice
     

    MTJW 360

    Innovations in Studio Practice
    Integration of design and progressive process is key to innovation in contemporary jewelry. In this course students are encouraged to be experimental and innovative in their approach to explore projects of greater complexity. Development of individual vision is emphasized. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 306, MTJW 355.

400 Level

  • MTJW 400 Senior Project I: Concept Development
     

    MTJW 400

    Senior Project I: Concept Development
    Students investigate the focus of their senior project and preparation of an advanced project proposal.  The process of refining their personal vision includes identification of concept, research of historically relevant form models, critical analysis of contemporary work, application of advanced design methodologies and evaluation of specific issues linked to resolution of the project proposal. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 360.
  • MTJW 403 Art Jewelry Studio
     

    MTJW 403

    Art Jewelry Studio
    This course focuses on the creation of one-of-a-kind art jewelry. Students are exposed to advanced techniques that resolve structural and aesthetic challenges while developing artistic vision. Emphasis is placed on the conceptual development of the work that explores the relationship between body and object. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 255, MTJW 304.
  • MTJW 409 Jewelry Senior Project
     

    MTJW 409

    Jewelry Senior Project
    This course guides students through the design and execution of their senior thesis project. An emphasis on research analysis and evaluation of aesthetic and conceptual decisions is stressed. Students create a body of work that supports the continued development of their professional portfolio. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 360.
  • MTJW 460 Senior Project II: Studio Application
     

    MTJW 460

    Senior Project II: Studio Application
      Students are guided through designing and producing a professional body of work that culminates in an exhibition. Critique and discussion serve as vehicles for revising and strengthening the realization of concepts. While creating this body of work, students develop a written statement that supports and validates their objects. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 400.
  • MTJW 490 Senior Capstone Experience: Professionalization and Practice
     

    MTJW 490

    Senior Capstone Experience: Professionalization and Practice
    Students prepare to address the concerns arising in professional venues through a series of discussions, presentations and studio activities. Emphasis is placed on developing strategies for effectively presenting ideas and designs, producing promotional packages and communicating with industry and business partners. Business practices and appropriate promotional strategies appropriate to individual career interests are covered. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 460.
  • MTJW 495 Special Topics in Jewelry
     

    MTJW 495

    Special Topics in Jewelry
    The topic of this course varies from quarter to quarter. Each seminar focuses on various issues in the field of jewelry and allows students to pursue individual projects related to the topic of the course. Prerequisite(s): Vary according to topic.

500 Level

  • MTJW 502 Contemporary Processes in Studio Practice
     

    MTJW 502

    Contemporary Processes in Studio Practice
    Proficiency in the application of studio process to solve problems and communicate ideas is critical to success in the discipline. Various tools, materials and methods of production and design are covered and applied through projects and assignments to develop effective results. Students investigate, learn and apply fabrication and design strategies with both traditional and alternative materials and processes.

700 Level

  • MTJW 702 History of Jewelry as Source
     

    MTJW 702

    History of Jewelry as Source
    Students undertake individual investigations of historic and ethnic examples of jewelry as a source for contemporary design. Application of personal research is the basis for studio work.
  • MTJW 705 Contextual Study I: Technical Research
     

    MTJW 705

    Contextual Study I: Technical Research
    Students propose and resolve technical issues. Creative problem-solving skills drive experimentation with materials and processes leading to diverse solutions for personal expression.
  • MTJW 708 Contextual Study II: Concept Development
     

    MTJW 708

    Contextual Study II: Concept Development
    Students are introduced to methodologies for developing conceptual bodies of work. By further developing strategies learned in previous courses, students begin to integrate content into their developing body of work. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 702, MTJW 705.
  • MTJW 724 Contemporary Issues in Jewelry
     

    MTJW 724

    Contemporary Issues in Jewelry
    This graduate seminar course addresses current issues in the field of jewelry. Students discuss readings, investigate a contemporary issue and prepare a paper and presentation based on that research. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 701, MTJW 702.
  • MTJW 730 Objects and Desire
     

    MTJW 730

    Objects and Desire
    In this studio course, students explore desire as the bridge between objects and meaning. Individual research leading to the development of studio work emerges from group discussion of assigned readings. Group critiques refine the development of form and content. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 708.
  • MTJW 731 Multiples: Objects for Adornment
     

    MTJW 731

    Multiples: Objects for Adornment
    The multiple in art ranges from a limited-edition sculptural object to mechanically mass-produced objects of sometimes-infinite number, intended for popular consumption. Multiples allow artists to experiment with issues and ideas that may be distributed more directly and more economically than traditional, unique artwork. Students build on skills and knowledge from previous coursework by interpreting the concept of multiples with their studio work. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 708.
  • MTJW 739 Theory and Criticism for Jewelry
     

    MTJW 739

    Theory and Criticism for Jewelry
    Students undertake readings in contemporary and historical philosophy that address concept and design in jewelry and metal objects. Classes focus on critical dialogue that analyzes contemporary issues pertinent to the fields of art, craft and design in the jewelry profession. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 701, MTJW 702.
  • MTJW 749 Jewelry M.A. Final Project
     

    MTJW 749

    Jewelry M.A. Final Project
    In this course, M.A. students develop professional competence in a specialized area of jewelry by exploring and completing a creative project. The course channels each student’s graduate coursework into a cohesive project that can be applied to professional goals. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 708 and completion of the review for candidacy.
  • MTJW 755 Integrated Solutions for Jewelry and Objects
     

    MTJW 755

    Integrated Solutions for Jewelry and Objects
    This course provides transition into the graduate thesis proposal. Students complete studio work that demonstrates technical proficiency integrated into and compatible with the concept pursued. Presentation, discussion and critique support the development of individual interests. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 731.
  • MTJW 765 Applied Theory and Practice in Jewelry
     

    MTJW 765

    Applied Theory and Practice in Jewelry
    Students conduct in-depth research on a topic in jewelry and objects that reflects their particular areas of interest. Conducting research, preparing preliminary work and proposing a thesis is the focus. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 702, MTJW 755.
  • MTJW 770 Professional Development in Jewelry
     

    MTJW 770

    Professional Development in Jewelry
    This course provides business strategies and legal issues within the field of art and design. Students define appropriate strategies for self-promotion that complement their professional vision. This course culminates in the effective presentation of student work. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 765.
  • MTJW 779F Graduate Field Internship
     

    MTJW 779F

    Graduate Field Internship
    Students in this course undertake a field assignment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good academic standing.
  • MTJW 779T Graduate Teaching Internship
     

    MTJW 779T

    Graduate Teaching Internship
    Students in this course undertake a teaching assignment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good academic standing.
  • MTJW 780 Special Topics in Jewelry
     

    MTJW 780

    Special Topics in Jewelry
    This course provides an opportunity for students to focus on particular issues in the field or to study advanced techniques and processes. Faculty, course content and prerequisites vary each time the course is offered. The course may include lectures, discussions, individual projects and critiques, depending on the nature of the topic.
  • MTJW 790 Jewelry M.F.A. Thesis
     

    MTJW 790

    Jewelry M.F.A. Thesis
    This course is the culmination of a M.F.A. in jewelry. Students are required to develop a professional collection of contemporary original work that demonstrates a critical expertise of the field. A written component rationalizing the relevance of the body of work is required. Students produce an exhibit in which their work and written component are presented. Prerequisite(s): MTJW 765 and completion of the review for candidacy.