Historic Preservation

Courses

100 Level

  • HIPR 101 Introduction to Historic Preservation
     

    HIPR 101

    Introduction to Historic Preservation
    This course introduces students to the story of historic preservation and the importance of preservation in our own times. Class lectures and guest speakers discuss the interdisciplinary nature of the profession. Study trips and site visits give students the opportunity to learn preservation philosophies and observe methods of preservation practice. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 100, ENGL 123.

200 Level

  • HIPR 202 Recording and Interpretation for Historical Buildings
     

    HIPR 202

    Recording and Interpretation for Historical Buildings
    This course introduces students to professional field techniques employed in the recording of historical buildings and related resources. Students study selected structures and identify significant features, prepare relevant survey material and complete effective visual records using sketching, drafting and computer modeling to professional standards. Prerequisite(s): DRAW 115.
  • HIPR 203 Preservation Research
     

    HIPR 203

    Preservation Research
    This course introduces students to sources and methods of investigation used by historic preservation professionals. Effective research techniques are highlighted in short exercises and through a comprehensive term project. All assignments enable students to address thematic and site-specific research problems similar to those they might expect when working in the field. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 101.

300 Level

  • HIPR 307 Preservation Technology I
     

    HIPR 307

    Preservation Technology I
    This course provides an introduction to the physical problems encountered in historic structures. Classroom lectures and site visits address the history of building technology and illustrate the ongoing processes of material deterioration. Students gain experience working with tools and processes utilized in restoration projects. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 101.
  • HIPR 308 Preservation Technology II
     

    HIPR 308

    Preservation Technology II
    This course continues themes from Preservation Technology I, addressing the study of conservation and preservation of materials found in the built environment. Students practice hands-on repair and stabilization methods using traditional and contemporary techniques within a studio environment. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 307.
  • HIPR 310 Material Culture
     

    HIPR 310

    Material Culture
    This course introduces the history, theory and method of material culture study—the study of objects as a means of interpreting past human activity. Students are introduced to the parameters of the field and the various methods of analyzing artifacts. The course focuses on analyzing the American home and its furnishings, stylistic evolution and the changes in historic interiors. European influences, religion and technology are addressed through classroom activities, presentations, guest lectures and site visits. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 101 or MUSM 201.  
  • HIPR 312 Digital Communication for Historic Preservation
     

    HIPR 312

    Digital Communication for Historic Preservation
    This course explores digital technology that supports historic preservation research, analysis and communication. Lectures and readings highlight digital innovations and real-world projects enable students to implement a variety of digital tools for laser scanning, modeling, information systems and data base design. Prerequisite(s): ELDS 225, HIPR 101.
  • HIPR 313 Preservation Law
     

    HIPR 313

    Preservation Law
    This course examines the history of preservation legislation in the United States and abroad. Students focus on fundamentals of legal protection and on the regulation of historic cultural resources. Legal issues in historic preservation are addressed in light of political systems and changing attitudes that influence how we advocate and support the protection of our historic environments. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 101.
  • HIPR 322 Preservation Economics
     

    HIPR 322

    Preservation Economics
    This course addresses the economic underpinnings with the continued use of historic buildings and sites as well as principles to be considered before undertaking preservation related projects. Class discussions consider social and cultural factors influencing financial approaches and ethics for preservation projects and initiatives. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 101.
  • HIPR 323 Historic Paint Analysis
     

    HIPR 323

    Historic Paint Analysis
    This course provides students with a working understanding of the conservation of wall paintings and their decorative reproduction as well as the process of paint analysis. Students are introduced to the mechanics of paint and associated materials as applied to the field of wall paintings and wood graining. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 101.
  • HIPR 331 Preservation Construction
     

    HIPR 331

    Preservation Construction
    This hands-on course addresses the contractor’s relationship to the historic structure and its potential use. The course includes field trips, classroom lectures, projects and on-site work at a university-sponsored preservation work in progress. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 307.
  • HIPR 335 The National Register of Historic Places
     

    HIPR 335

    The National Register of Historic Places
    The National Register of Historic Places is a list of the most significant cultural resources in America, making it not only a prestigious goal, but also an important tool for preservationists. Through readings, examination of case studies and assignments, students learn the history and development of the National Register as well as a thorough study of the National Register nomination process. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 203.
  • HIPR 360 International Preservation Technology
     

    HIPR 360

    International Preservation Technology
    This course is traditionally offered as part of a travel study program and is designed to give students a global perspective of historic preservation and conservation practices. Students are introduced to methodologies utilized by the international community to conserve the built environment. This course addresses the broader issues of preservation theory and planning, as well as the details of analysis and technical intervention. Students meet preservation professionals and participate in a hands-on practical preservation project. Field trips add additional perspective. The course culminates in written documentation of the international preservation experience. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

400 Level

  • HIPR 400 Architectural Glass Preservation Techniques
     

    HIPR 400

    Architectural Glass Preservation Techniques
    Combining site visits with the use of lab and workshop facilities, this studio course takes students through the various forms of architectural glass.  Students study common preservation challenges encountered with architectural glass and apply appropriate techniques for its conservation. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 307.
  • HIPR 402 Preservation Planning
     

    HIPR 402

    Preservation Planning
    This course includes both field and class experiences in preservation planning. Students develop sample preservation plans that address small town or rural issues and the challenges of an urban setting. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 101, HIPR 203.
  • HIPR 404 Preservation Management: Nonprofit
     

    HIPR 404

    Preservation Management: Nonprofit
    This course focuses on the processes for successful nonprofit historic preservation organizations. Students are introduced to organizational management skills, including the roles and responsibilities of the director, the executive committee, the board of directors and other committees. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 101, HIPR 203.
  • HIPR 407 Adaptive Rehabilitation
     

    HIPR 407

    Adaptive Rehabilitation
    This course enables students to address historic preservation methods to a specific historic structure in need of rehabilitation. Students utilize research and assessments to support feasibility studies and design solutions. Particular emphasis is given to the guidelines and financial incentives established by governmental agencies. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 203, HIPR 307, HIPR 322.
  • HIPR 409 Conservation Science and Preservation Technology
     

    HIPR 409

    Conservation Science and Preservation Technology
    Buildings materials are subject to decay and deterioration at different rates for different reasons. Understanding what factors contribute to the decay and deterioration of building materials is the first step in slowing, arresting or altering that process. This course presents a fundamental overview of the history, evolution and use of a range of historic building materials. Students build on this knowledge to examine the interaction between materials and mechanisms of decay and deterioration and to explore methods for arresting, abating or altering this process. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 101.
  • HIPR 410 Topics and Techniques in Historic Landscape Preservation
     

    HIPR 410

    Topics and Techniques in Historic Landscape Preservation
    This studio course explores various topics and techniques in historic landscape preservation, with an emphasis on applying the Secretary of the Interior’s Guidelines for the Treatment of Cultural Landscapes to selected sites. Lectures, readings, class discussions and presentations, graphic exercises, site visits and field trips illustrate the issues. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 101.
  • HIPR 425 Downtown Revitalization
     

    HIPR 425

    Downtown Revitalization
    This course provides a holistic analysis of the process by which downtown areas can be revitalized. The course explores the Main Street Four-Point Approach that combines organization, design, promotion and economic restructuring to accomplish sustainable revitalization of downtowns. The course also considers the effects of current trends in development, such as smart growth and New Urbanism, on the process of downtown revitalization. The course uses lectures to explain concepts and case studies to emphasize concepts. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 313.
  • HIPR 445 Emerging Issues in Historic Preservation
     

    HIPR 445

    Emerging Issues in Historic Preservation
    Historic preservation does not exist in isolation. Like any field, it is impacted by social, technological and political issues.  Practicing preservation in this rapidly changing world can be immensely challenging. This seminar course helps prepare students to meaningfully address those challenges by providing students an environment for analysis and discussion of contemporary issues affecting the preservation profession. Students explore theoretical and practical solutions that have been utilized locally, in the United States and abroad. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 307.
  • HIPR 446 Cemetery Preservation Field Techniques
     

    HIPR 446

    Cemetery Preservation Field Techniques
    Cemeteries are complex historic sites requiring the preservationist to be able to treat a variety of materials (from marble to cast iron) in a variety of forms (from headstones to fences). Through a combination of lectures, laboratory and field work, students in this course learn to apply conservation techniques toward the preservation of historic cemeteries. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 307.
  • HIPR 450 Preservation of the Recent Past
     

    HIPR 450

    Preservation of the Recent Past
    This course introduces students to the timely and controversial topic of the preservation of our more recent heritage. Through lectures, site visits, readings and discussions, students explore the myriad challenges associated with the preservation of these resources and learn about national and international efforts to address their preservation. Students then apply this knowledge to their final project, which focuses on an issue related to preserving the recent past. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 101, HIPR 202.
  • HIPR 465 Professional Practice in Historic Preservation
     

    HIPR 465

    Professional Practice in Historic Preservation
    Students are introduced to practical strategies for obtaining employment in their field. Additionally, students develop an understanding of successful and ethical business practices framed in a paradigm of ecologically sustainable preservation. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 307.
  • HIPR 479 Undergraduate Internship
     

    HIPR 479

    Undergraduate Internship
    Students in this course undertake a field assignment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 60 credit hours, 2.5 overall GPA.
  • HIPR 480 Historic Preservation Senior Project
     

    HIPR 480

    Historic Preservation Senior Project
    This required course emphasizes the production of a meaningful historic preservation philosophy to be included in a portfolio produced to professional standards. Students participate in intensive critiques of historic preservation projects, written work, and oral and digital presentations as they prepare themselves for opportunities in the historic preservation profession. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 407.
  • HIPR 499 Special Topics in Historic Preservation
     

    HIPR 499

    Special Topics in Historic Preservation
    The topic of this course varies from quarter to quarter. Each seminar focuses on various issues in the field of historic preservation and allows students to pursue individual research projects related to the topic of the course. Prerequisite(s): Vary according to topic.

500 Level

  • HIPR 501 Communication for the Preservationist 1
     

    HIPR 501

    Communication for the Preservationist
    1
    This course delves into the communication challenges demanded of graduate students in historic preservation. Students strengthen their skills in visual literacy by sketching and drawing the built environment. Communication skills in writing and public speaking are also reinforced through classroom exercises and critiques. 
  • HIPR 502 The Technology of Historic Structures 1
     

    HIPR 502

    The Technology of Historic Structures
    1
    This course provides an overview of the materials and technology of the built environment. The student explores the context, materials, methods and technical protocols of buildings and structures. This course encompasses building technology from prehistory to the present from the perspective of the preservationist.

700 Level

  • HIPR 700 Introduction to International Preservation
     

    HIPR 700

    Introduction to International Preservation
    Through the study of a range of World Heritage sites, students explore what these resources represent to various cultures and arguments for why they should be the subject of effective and sustained preservation efforts. Topics include identifying cultural heritage, tangible and intangible heritage, and intercultural encounters.
  • HIPR 701 Preservation History and Theory 1
     

    HIPR 701

    Preservation History and Theory
    1
    This course is designed to provide graduate students with an understanding of the history, methodology and practice of historic preservation. Practical, legal and philosophical issues are examined through lectures, discussions and site visits.
  • HIPR 703 Preservation Law and Advocacy 1
     

    HIPR 703

    Preservation Law and Advocacy
    1
    This course examines the evolution of historic preservation laws at the federal, state and local levels. It begins with an understanding of the legal system in the United States and how laws are made and then explores specific laws that apply to historic preservation and cultural resources, including provisions of the U.S. Constitution. Topics include the Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the Department of Transportation Act of 1966 and the Environmental Policy Act of 1969 as well as more recent and more specific federal and state laws. Specific attention is paid to local land use planning and local historic district control as well as to national mechanisms for the protection of historic and cultural resources. Evolution and application of the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards are considered, and the legal basis for the National Register of Historic Properties and National Historic Landmarks is considered. This course also exposes students to historic preservation and cultural resource advocacy groups, their areas of concern and their effect on historic preservation and cultural resource laws. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701 or permission of the department chair.
  • HIPR 704 Preservation Economics and Development 1
     

    HIPR 704

    Preservation Economics and Development
    1
    This course examines the economic effects of historic preservation activities and strategies for achieving economic viability for rehabilitated historic buildings. The course begins with examination of basic economic concepts that affect the cost of and return from rehabilitated historic buildings, and then allows students to apply those concepts to theoretical rehabilitation projects. The course also explores economic incentives that have special application to historic properties, including tax credits and conservation easements. Topics include valuation of historic properties, financing of historic properties and marketing of historic properties. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701.
  • HIPR 706 Preservation Research and Survey 1
     

    HIPR 706

    Preservation Research and Survey
    1
    This course is designed to give students a thorough understanding of research and survey. Students apply research skills to general and specific research projects and develop historic resource survey skills by examining underlying principles of survey.
  • HIPR 709 Conservation Science and Preservation Technology 1
     

    HIPR 709

    Conservation Science and Preservation Technology
    1
    This course presents a fundamental overview of the materials found in the make-up of historic structures—their composition, application and function. The history and evolution of materials, the remedial abatement of deterioration and long-term maintenance are also addressed.
  • HIPR 712 Digital Communication for Historic Preservation
     

    HIPR 712

    Digital Communication for Historic Preservation
    This course initiates advanced study of digital technologies that historic preservation professionals utilize in support of their research, analysis and communication. Students gain experience with laser scanning, geographic information systems, modeling and database design. Lectures, discussions and readings highlight how technology is used in the field and projects enable students to learn how to apply these tools. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701.
  • HIPR 716 Building Assessment Strategies I 1
     

    HIPR 716

    Building Assessment Strategies I
    1
    This course presents methods for the analysis and interpretation of historic building resources. Identification, research, documentation, analysis and interpretation skills are developed through filed application and projects. This course is required for the Master of Arts and Master of Fine Arts degrees. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 709.
  • HIPR 717 Preservation of the Cultural Landscape
     

    HIPR 717

    Preservation of the Cultural Landscape
    The cultural landscape is the tangible and intangible impression made by humans on their environment. In this course, students examine the relationship between the cultural landscape and the built environment. Topics include whether or not to preserve a cultural landscape in a changing world – and how to meet the challenge.
  • HIPR 718 International Heritage Protection
     

    HIPR 718

    International Heritage Protection
    International heritage protection relies on cooperative agreements or conventions that address the protection of cultural resources. Several international organizations have as part of their mission the identification, documentation and protection of cultural resources. This course explores the international agreements intended to protect cultural resources, considers how those agreements operate and evaluates their effectiveness. Students investigate the workings of international organizations that deal with the protection of cultural resources.
  • HIPR 720 Heritage Tourism
     

    HIPR 720

    Heritage Tourism
    Heritage tourism is a significant part of the economy of many places in the world. It can be an important vehicle for cultural exchange, providing a personal experience not only of what has survived from the past but of the contemporary society. Heritage tourism can also overwhelm an area and contribute to the decline and near destruction of a culture. This course examines the phenomenon of heritage tourism and considers its benefits, its burdens and how it may be managed.
  • HIPR 721 Preservation Planning in the Built Environment 1
     

    HIPR 721

    Preservation Planning in the Built Environment
    1
    This course acknowledges linkages between rural and urban preservation and addresses issues and planning strategies common to both settings. Through readings and extended project work, students are introduced to the philosophy, problems and practical solutions of preservation planning. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 703.
  • HIPR 726 Revitalizing Downtowns 1
     

    HIPR 726

    Revitalizing Downtowns
    1
    This course incorporates concepts of law, economics and planning to provide a holistic analysis of the process by which downtown areas can be revitalized. The course explores the Main Street Four-Point Approach that combines organization, design, promotion and economic restructuring to accomplish sustainable revitalization of downtowns. The course also considers the effects of current trends in development, such as Smart Growth and New Urbanism, on the process of downtown revitalization. The course uses lectures to explain and case studies to emphasize concepts.
  • HIPR 729 International Preservation Seminar
     

    HIPR 729

    International Preservation Seminar
    International preservation organizations, techniques and relationships evolve and change. This course provides an opportunity for students to observe the changes that are occurring in the field of international preservation as well as focus on topical issues. This course also serves as the beginning of the students’ formulation of their topic and research methodology for the final project. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 700.
  • HIPR 730 Historic Paint and Decorative Finish Analysis
     

    HIPR 730

    Historic Paint and Decorative Finish Analysis
    This course introduces the methodology of historic paint and decorative finish analysis. On-site and laboratory examination of historic finishes are accomplished using traditional accepted technologies. Students also recreate and remediate damaged finishes. Color analysis in this course is standardized using the Munsell® color system.
  • HIPR 732 The Cultural Landscape of Petroleum
     

    HIPR 732

    The Cultural Landscape of Petroleum
    This seminar course introduces students to landmark texts and readings relevant to the impact of petroleum in our cultural landscape. Readings and discussions explore the cultural influences behind our conscious and unconscious reliance on petroleum. Coursework is aimed at offering differing approaches to identifying the depth of oil’s influence on our culture and the possible solutions for sustainable communities.
  • HIPR 733 Preservation of the Recent Past
     

    HIPR 733

    Preservation of the Recent Past
    This dynamic seminar course introduces students to the timely and controversial topic of the preservation of our more recent heritage. Through lectures, site visits, readings and discussions, students explore and analyze the myriad challenges associated with the preservation of these resources. The impact of previous and current national and international initiatives is evaluated. Students then apply this knowledge to a project that focuses on developing innovative, practical, philosophically-grounded and replicable solutions to address the many challenges of preserving the recent past.
  • HIPR 734 Preservation Rehabilitation 1
     

    HIPR 734

    Preservation Rehabilitation
    1
    In this course, students undertake and complete a rehabilitation plan for a specified structure, making use of skills acquired in historic preservation and addressing the needs of commercial viability. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701, HIPR 706, HIPR 709, HIPR 716.
  • HIPR 736 Heritage Conservation and the Creative City
     

    HIPR 736

    Heritage Conservation and the Creative City
    This course is designed for students who are passionate about the cities and places where we live, work and play. This course explores the role of historic preservation in creative city-making across the globe. Students analyze nontraditional and creative ways to improve the urban cultural environment, while addressing issues such as globalization, technology, transportation, gentrification and poverty. Students analyze the impact that the creative city-making, shrinking cities and megaregions have upon historic structures and culture and discuss the implications for the future of historic preservation. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701.
  • HIPR 739 International Preservation Technology
     

    HIPR 739

    International Preservation Technology
    The techniques that are used to preserve cultural heritage vary according to the resource itself. Other influences include the spatial and temporal contexts in which they were created, and the current conditions under which they exist. This course examines the wide range of preservation techniques from around the world as they apply to specific resources, and considers how those techniques might provide insight into addressing preservation issues from other areas. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 700.
  • HIPR 742 Preservation Management for the Nonprofit
     

    HIPR 742

    Preservation Management for the Nonprofit
    This course focuses on the processes for successful nonprofit historic organizations. The course provides information about roles and responsibilities of the director, the executive committee, the board of directors and committees. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701.
  • HIPR 743 Advanced Conservation Science
     

    HIPR 743

    Advanced Conservation Science
    This course presents the analytical methodology required to understand the characteristics of building materials. Students are involved in various experiments that analyze the chemical and physical mechanisms of material deterioration and use scientific methods to interpret this data. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 709.
  • HIPR 745 Emerging Issues in Historic Preservation
     

    HIPR 745

    Emerging Issues in Historic Preservation
    This seminar course provides students an environment for analysis and discussion of contemporary issues affecting the preservation profession. Theoretical and practical approaches to such issues as social, technological and political changes are analyzed for their impact on historic preservation and heritage stewardship locally, nationally and internationally.
  • HIPR 746 Architectural Glass Preservation Techniques
     

    HIPR 746

    Architectural Glass Preservation Techniques
    Taking a comprehensive approach to the treatment of historic architectural glass, students learn its various forms, common deterioration challenges and ethical procedures for the application of conservation techniques. Site visits and demonstrations are combined with hands-on opportunities for students in this studio course. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 709.
  • HIPR 747 Conservation in Historic Cemeteries
     

    HIPR 747

    Conservation in Historic Cemeteries
    Preservationists working in historic cemeteries must have a comprehensive approach to conservation. This course offers a range of experiences (classroom, laboratory and field) for the student to learn methods for conserving monuments and enclosures in such materials as wood, stone and metal. As a cultural landscape, the cemetery's history, form and meaning are addressed in treatment. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 709.
  • HIPR 749 Historic Preservation M.A. Final Project 1
     

    HIPR 749

    Historic Preservation M.A. Final Project
    1
    This course focuses on the development and completion of a final, comprehensive M.A. project. Projects may be research or site based and must be conducted at an advanced level of complexity and challenge. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 704 and completion of the review for candidacy.
  • HIPR 751 Building Assessment Strategies II
     

    HIPR 751

    Building Assessment Strategies II
    This course is second in a two-course sequence. The course provides a comprehensive assessment of historic building resources. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 716.
  • HIPR 755 Preservation Philosophy and Criticism
     

    HIPR 755

    Preservation Philosophy and Criticism
    This course analyzes critically the cultural and technical basis of the built environment. Based on this analysis, students examine the repertoire of preservation philosophies, both historic and current. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701, HIPR 706.
  • HIPR 757 Preservation Restoration
     

    HIPR 757

    Preservation Restoration
    This course examines the appropriate application of restoration standards in historic buildings. Emphasis is placed on significant structures worthy of total restoration and practical restoration of building fabrics. Restoration standards in this course follow those established by the Secretary of the Interior. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701, HIPR 706, HIPR 716.
  • HIPR 762 Interpreting the Domestic Interior 1830-1930
     

    HIPR 762

    Interpreting the Domestic Interior 1830-1930
    The period 1830-1930 witnessed a nation that possessed an expanding frontier, a belief in personal upward mobility and the freedom for great geographic and social mobility. Supported by the innovations in technology, communications and science the built environment and material culture of the nation changed dramatically between 1830 and 1930. Apart from examining the stylistic changes occurring in architecture and domestic fashion the students are encouraged to examine and consider the evolution of issues such as comfort, domesticity, hygiene, privacy, gender and the technology of the domestic interior. Source material includes trade catalogues, novels, films, house plans and other period and contemporary resources. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701.
  • HIPR 765 Preservation Seminar
     

    HIPR 765

    Preservation Seminar
    This second-year graduate lecture series prepares students for entry into the field of historic preservation. Classroom activities are augmented by guest lectures by professionals and field trips to successful preservation organizations in the Southeast. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 701, HIPR 706, HIPR 709.
  • HIPR 779F Graduate Field Internship
     

    HIPR 779F

    Graduate Field Internship
    Students in this course undertake a field assignment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good academic standing.
  • HIPR 779T Graduate Teaching Internship
     

    HIPR 779T

    Graduate Teaching Internship
    Students in this course undertake a teaching assignment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good academic standing.
  • HIPR 780 Special Topics in Historic Preservation
     

    HIPR 780

    Special Topics in Historic Preservation
    This course examines topical issues in preservation. Issues vary from term to term. Prerequisite(s): Varies according to topic.
  • HIPR 791 Historic Preservation M.F.A. Thesis I: Research and Analysis
     

    HIPR 791

    Historic Preservation M.F.A. Thesis I: Research and Analysis
    This course serves as the first part of a two-course sequence dedicated to the development and production of the historic preservation thesis and the culmination of the M.F.A. course of study. Following committee approval of the thesis proposal, research begins on the integral concerns of the thesis, including problem definition, process inquiry, critical thinking synthesis and communication with the advice and guidance of faculty. Emphasis is placed on a high degree of complexity and challenge within the thesis project. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 765 and completion of the review for candidacy.
  • HIPR 792 Historic Preservation M.F.A. Thesis II: Development and Presentation
     

    HIPR 792

    Historic Preservation M.F.A. Thesis II: Development and Presentation
    This course serves as the second part of a two-course sequence dedicated to the development and production of a major historic preservation thesis as the culmination of the graduate student’s course of study. Students continue the thesis through the conventional phases of problem identification, research, synthesis and problem resolution. Prerequisite(s): HIPR 791 and completion of the review for candidacy.