General Education

Courses

100 Level

  • ANAT 100 General Anatomy Course is available via eLearning
     

    ANAT 100

    General Anatomy
    Course is available via eLearning
    This introductory science course investigates the structures found inside the human body and relates these structures to their specific functions, reviewing all 11 human organ systems. Students also learn comparative anatomy by comparing human structures to those of other animals.
  • BIOL 100 Environmental Science
     

    BIOL 100

    Environmental Science
    This is a multimedia-based course that focuses on a general introduction to the natural environment, with emphasis on coastal Georgia’s marshes and the ocean. Subjects studied include biomes, food chains, conservation and environmental problems, with an emphasis on environmental literacy.
  • MATH 100 College Mathematics Course is available via eLearning
     

    MATH 100

    College Mathematics
    Course is available via eLearning
    This course is designed to provide a foundation of mathematical knowledge for college students, including instruction in logical reasoning, mathematical language, problem-solving and critical thinking skills. Students may not earn credit for both MATH 100 and MATH 101.
  • ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology Course is available via eLearning
     

    ANTH 101

    Introduction to Anthropology
    Course is available via eLearning
    This course introduces the anthropological study of the human species, culture and society, exploring similarities and differences in the ways human beings adapt to the natural environment and to each other. By examining how different peoples sustain themselves, interact with one another, perceive art and react to the inevitability of death, students reach a better understanding of themselves and the basics of human biology, society and culture.
  • ASTR 101 Introduction to Astronomy
     

    ASTR 101

    Introduction to Astronomy
    This survey course investigates the physical nature of the universe, examining the sun, planets, stars and galaxies through a pictorial exploration of space via images obtained from Earth-bound telescopes and from spacecraft. Special topics of interest include quasars, black holes and a historical look at the space program.
  • BUSI 101 Introduction to Business
     

    BUSI 101

    Introduction to Business
    This course provides students with skills to successfully integrate business skills with their art and design skills to foster opportunity for professional practices in entrepreneurship, marketing, finance, budgeting and basic legal issues such as contracts, loan agreements, consignment agreements and commission agreements.
  • CHIN 101 Introduction to Chinese (Mandarin)
     

    CHIN 101

    Introduction to Chinese (Mandarin)
    This course allows students to learn and use basic vocabulary and structures and understand social elements of the target language. Students in this course learn to appreciate the diversity of Chinese culture and its contribution to global events.
  • FREN 101 French I
     

    FREN 101

    French I
    This course allows students to learn and use basic vocabulary and structures, and understand social elements of the target language. Students in this course learn to appreciate the diversity of French culture and its contribution to global events.
  • MATH 101 Intermediate Mathematics
     

    MATH 101

    Intermediate Mathematics
    Students study functions, graphs and modeling to prepare for advanced study in applied mathematics, including the application of equations to modeling physical phenomena and the advanced study of algebraic and trigonometric functions.
  • MUSC 101 Music Appreciation
     

    MUSC 101

    Music Appreciation
    This course provides an introduction to the art of music listening and musical principles. A wide variety of musical literature is introduced, ranging from classical music, theater and film, to jazz and popular music. The main focus of this course is to provide students with broad-based musical knowledge to form the foundation for musical listening skills and music theory. This course functions as the introductory course for the music performance minor as well as a general education elective for all students.
  • PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy
     

    PHIL 101

    Introduction to Philosophy
    This course provides a general introduction to the study of philosophy, including analysis of the soundness of arguments. Terms are precisely defined, and topics of contemporary relevance are explored.
  • PHSC 101 Introduction to Physical Science
     

    PHSC 101

    Introduction to Physical Science
    This course is an introductory blend of many concepts in science for the art student with an emphasis on structure and application when appropriate. As the student investigates the concepts of the physical sciences, a new window is opened into the nature of the work they shape, paint or design. Fundamental concepts in physics and chemistry that help guide their future manipulation of the world that surrounds them are studied and experienced. Exploring the earth and the volcanic forces that shape the continents, the sky with the most complex weather in the solar system and the stars above leads to a “greener” appreciation of this planet and hopefully inspires the artist. Prerequisite(s): Any MATH course or SAT math score of at least 560 or ACT math score of at least 24.
  • PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology Course is available via eLearning
     

    PSYC 101

    Introduction to Psychology
    Course is available via eLearning
    This course provides an overview of the scientific study of behavior, mental processes, inter- and intra-personal relationships, emotions, motivations, personal development, personality, self, learning, perception and abnormal psychology. Students are introduced to the many different trends and theories of psychology. Classes focus on developing critical thinking skills.
  • SPAN 101 Spanish I
     

    SPAN 101

    Spanish I
    This introductory course is designed for students who have not previously studied Spanish. The curriculum includes main patterns of grammar, conversation practice and written exercises.
  • COMM 105 Speech and Public Speaking Course is available via eLearning
     

    COMM 105

    Speech and Public Speaking
    Course is available via eLearning
    This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and practices of public speaking. Topics include organization and communication skills that focus on audience analysis, topic selection, delivery styles, listening skills, critical thinking, argumentation, verbal and nonverbal skills, and the acquisition of academic resources.
  • ANTH 106 Language, Culture and Society
     

    ANTH 106

    Language, Culture and Society
    This course provides an introduction to relationships between human language, culture and society. Students examine and explore the properties of human language that make it unique. The course encourages students to address the prominent role of language in cultural models and social organizations.
  • ANTH 107 Introduction to Visual Anthropology
     

    ANTH 107

    Introduction to Visual Anthropology
    Visual anthropology addresses complex meanings, symbols, methodology and cultural aspects associated with media and anthropology. Students in this course learn the history of visual anthropology, beginning with the first anthropologists who used images to record cultures, as well as the concerns of those who use film and photography as tools of documentation. Students examine the definition and techniques associated with creating an ethnographic film. They also are exposed to texts that deal with the construction of images, the power of icons and media as an artifact of culture. Students create one short ethnographic film or photo series as an introductory level ethnographic work in the field of visual anthropology.
  • COMM 110 Interpersonal Communication
     

    COMM 110

    Interpersonal Communication
    This course provides the opportunity for students to develop interpersonal communication skills, understand communication strategies and learn about the interpersonal dynamic.
  • POLS 110 Contemporary Issues in American Politics
     

    POLS 110

    Contemporary Issues in American Politics
    This course highlights various contemporary social and political issues. Students are expected to investigate and evaluate arguments about current topics, such as reproductive rights, gun control, affirmative action, economic and environmental issues, welfare, education, and health care policy.
  • POLS 120 Global Political Issues
     

    POLS 120

    Global Political Issues
    Students examine a variety of contemporary global issues in this course, with an emphasis on emerging trends that are changing our world. Students investigate the linkages of a variety of economic, political and social issues from an international perspective reflecting a variety of points of view.
  • ENGL 123 Composition Course is available via eLearning
     

    ENGL 123

    Composition
    Course is available via eLearning
    This course examines written exposition and communication. Assignments include analyzing and composing essays and implementing research skills.
  • ENGL 124 Composition and Literature
     

    ENGL 124

    Composition and Literature
    This course provides an introduction to the study of literature. Students are expected to demonstrate understanding and use of essay techniques in the form of literary analysis. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 125 Literature of the South
     

    ENGL 125

    Literature of the South
    This course looks at the South through its rich literary heritage—Southern folklore, historical accounts and work of Southern authors including Flannery O’Connor, William Faulkner and James Dickey. Various forms of composition are reviewed. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • PSYC 126 A Psychology of Self
     

    PSYC 126

    A Psychology of Self
    This course explores various psychological theories and methods designed to facilitate an understanding of self and self in relation to others, moving beyond the general applications addressed in Introduction to Psychology.
  • COMM 130 Introduction to Mass Communication
     

    COMM 130

    Introduction to Mass Communication
    This course introduces students to the nine types of media: broadcast TV, cable TV, radio, Internet, books, magazines, newspapers, sound recording and film. This course emphasizes the history of each of these media and explains the cultural impact of each. In addition, a focus is placed on media literacy and critical thinking. Prerequisite(s): COMM 105.
  • MUSC 130 World Music
     

    MUSC 130

    World Music
    An introduction to the music of the world’s peoples, this course studies music outside of the traditions of Western music and within its cultural context. A variety of music is studied, including music from Africa, India and Japan. Musical elements such as melody, harmony, rhythm, tone colors, form and analysis are applied to music study through listening and aural exercises, written papers, class presentation and group discussion.
  • ENGL 137 Shakespeare
     

    ENGL 137

    Shakespeare
    This course explores the life and work of William Shakespeare. Representative examples of his poetry, histories, tragedies and comedies are examined. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 139 The Romantic Revolution
     

    ENGL 139

    The Romantic Revolution
    This course analyzes the work of Romantic writers of the late 18th and 19th centuries, such as William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Walt Whitman. Students also concentrate on writing essays. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • MATH 140 The Geometry of Physical Space
     

    MATH 140

    The Geometry of Physical Space
    Students explore, analyze and quantify the structure of 2-D and 3-D space and spatial relationships, including the geometry of everyday physical objects. In so doing, students learn how to solve geometry problems that emphasize proofs, Euclidean constructions, right-triangle theorems, properties of geometric figures, tessellations in the plane, theorems of circles and the Golden Ratio.
  • MUSC 140 Music Theory
     

    MUSC 140

    Music Theory
    This course is designed for all students pursuing careers in which music plays a vital role. The course focuses on the fundamentals of music: notation, rhythm, scales, tonality, keys and modes, intervals, transposition, and chords. Rhythmic, harmonic and melodic principles are investigated through a variety of individual and group activities including written and aural exercises.
  • ENGL 141 Arthurian Literature
     

    ENGL 141

    Arthurian Literature
    Arthurian legend forms an exquisite backdrop for creative expression. Students explore Arthurian traditions over time and across genres by reading medieval texts and modern revisions, tracing themes such as quest, kingdom and courtly love, and evaluating why and how the traditions remain vital. Students also encounter visual and musical adaptations of the material. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • PHIL 142 Studies in Existential Philosophy
     

    PHIL 142

    Studies in Existential Philosophy
    This course examines the thought and literature of existentialism, a modern philosophy of human existence. Topics include the nature of angst, the struggle for individuality and authority, and the impact of mass institutions on the individual. The writings of Søren Kierkegaard, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre, Albert Camus, Franz Kafka and others are explored. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 145 World Masterpieces
     

    ENGL 145

    World Masterpieces
    Selected writings from Asia, Greece, Rome and medieval Europe form the basis for study in this course. Students read and interpret different forms of poetry, drama and prose; relate the literature to the culture and age in which it was produced; and discuss trends in world literature through various time periods. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 148 Psychological Realism in Literature
     

    ENGL 148

    Psychological Realism in Literature
    This course focuses on the writings of Henry James, William Faulkner, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf and Djuna Barnes. Through readings, discussions and written assignments, students identify and describe specific structural characteristics used in psychological realism. Students are also expected to identify and describe the usage of these characteristics through literary analysis. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • MATH 150 Elementary Statistics
     

    MATH 150

    Elementary Statistics
    This course introduces powerful ideas, methods and applications of statistics that strengthen critical thinking, problem-solving and communication skills valuable in diverse fields of art and design, including urban planning, architecture, fashion marketing, advertising, arts administration and more. Topics include descriptive statistics, the visual representation of data, elementary probability, procedures for sampling, techniques of estimation and more. These concepts and methodologies are utilized to enhance research methods and business practices across art and design.
  • ENGL 155 Literature by Women
     

    ENGL 155

    Literature by Women
    This course examines the work of women writers from diverse backgrounds and cultures and analyzes the influences on their lives. Traditional women’s roles are explored and compared to more contemporary roles. Writers include Virginia Woolf, Toni Morrison, Dorothy Allison, Amy Tan, Eudora Welty and Alice Walker. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • CREA 157 Poetry Writing I
     

    CREA 157

    Poetry Writing I
    Through workshops, poetry revisions and analyses of major modern and postmodern poets, this course covers basic techniques in poetry. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • MATH 160 Contemporary Mathematics in Real-world Phenomena
     

    MATH 160

    Contemporary Mathematics in Real-world Phenomena
    Students apply algebraic and geometric principles to environments and phenomena in society, nature, architecture and art. Through an elementary study of game theory, fractals, symmetry, patterns, etc., students investigate how humans play, interact and employ mathematics to understand and optimize real-world events.
  • ENGL 161 Modern and Contemporary American Poetry
     

    ENGL 161

    Modern and Contemporary American Poetry
    Through the study of modern and contemporary poetics, students experience the various offerings of American poetry, from the first inklings of modern experiment in Walt Whitman’s work to the contemporary poems of Collins. Students gain an understanding of the legacy of the poetics, politics and social conscience of the past and how it influences contemporary poetry and social culture. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • CREA 162 Fiction Writing I
     

    CREA 162

    Fiction Writing I
    Through workshops, draft revisions and analyses of major modern and contemporary fiction writers, this course covers basic techniques in fiction. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 166 African-American Literature Course is available via eLearning
     

    ENGL 166

    African-American Literature
    Course is available via eLearning
    This course introduces students to African-American literature and culture through autobiographies, novels, short stories, poetry, plays and supplementary audiovisual materials. Students are expected to use their analytical skills to write short critical response papers and discuss the assigned texts. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 167 American Realists and Naturalists: 1850-1900
     

    ENGL 167

    American Realists and Naturalists: 1850-1900
    This course examines writers’ responses to nature, urbanization and the Industrial Revolution by analyzing the changing view of human nature during these years. The study of Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mark Twain, William Dean Howells, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson introduces students to the great American fiction writers, poets and essayists of the second half of the 19th century. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 168 American Moderns: 1900-1945 Course is available via eLearning
     

    ENGL 168

    American Moderns: 1900-1945
    Course is available via eLearning
    This course examines the wealth of creativity in American letters during the early 20th century. Authors may include Kate Chopin, Sherwood Anderson, Sinclair Lewis, Henry James, Theodore Dreiser, Willa Cather, T.S. Eliot, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Djuna Barnes and others. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 169 Today’s Classics: 1945-Present
     

    ENGL 169

    Today’s Classics: 1945-Present
    This course examines the powerful array of great writing in the latter part of the 20th century. Authors may include Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, John Hawkes, John Barth, E.L. Doctorow, Anne Tyler, Flannery O’Connor, Thomas Berger, Thomas Pynchon, John Updike, Eudora Welty, James Dickey, Tennessee Williams, Sam Shepard, Donald Barthelme, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Walker Percy, Joan Didion, Toni Morrison, Arthur Miller and Bernard Malamud. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 170 Satire in Great Literature
     

    ENGL 170

    Satire in Great Literature
    From Jonathan Swift’s "A Modest Proposal" in 1729 to the present, writers have employed satire as the weapon of choice in making social statements. This course examines writers such as Swift, Alexander Pope, Mark Twain, Sinclair Lewis, George Orwell, James Thurber, Flannery O’Connor, Joseph Heller, Kurt Vonnegut, Douglas Adams, Thomas Pynchon, Tom Wolfe, T.R. Pearson, Edward Albee and Samuel Beckett. In addition, satirists such as cartoonists from The New Yorker and sequential artists such as Gary Trudeau may be discussed. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 171 World Mythology
     

    ENGL 171

    World Mythology
    This course introduces students to the major issues, literature and art of world mythologies, with a primary focus on what is termed “classical mythology.” In addition to Greek and Roman myths, the course content includes tales and legends from Asia, North and South America, Australia and Africa. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 176 Classics of Science Fiction
     

    ENGL 176

    Classics of Science Fiction
    This course introduces several classic texts and films in the science fiction genre. Emphasis is given to the social and historical contexts in which the genre has evolved. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • CREA 178 The Short Story
     

    CREA 178

    The Short Story
    Students are expected to apply diverse points of view and a range of narrative strategies to the writing of short stories. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 179 French Literature
     

    ENGL 179

    French Literature
    French literature of the 19th and 20th centuries is the focus of this course. Readings and class discussions center on definitions and techniques of literary genres, literary movements and historical events in France as well as the contributions of specific French writers. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • BUSI 180 Introduction to Economics
     

    BUSI 180

    Introduction to Economics
    Students receive an introduction to the principles of economics, microeconomics, markets, individual choice and firm behavior. Topics may also include macroeconomics, the study of economic growth, unemployment and inflation. Emphasis is placed on learning the methods and tools of economics, effectively applying them to a wide range of everyday problems and learning strategies used to evaluate current and past economic events and policies.
  • ENGL 180 Writing Fundamentals for Screen and Stage
     

    ENGL 180

    Writing Fundamentals for Screen and Stage
    Artists working in areas including film, performing art, animation and sequential art rely on narrative writing as a means to develop plot, character and story. This course is designed to provide students with exposure to various types of narrative literature, as well as to appropriate software applications for writing narratives for screen and stage. Students master the fundamental mechanics and structure of screenwriting, playwriting and other narrative work. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 186 Hispanic Literature
     

    ENGL 186

    Hispanic Literature
    This course centers on Latin American/Hispanic literature in the 19th and 20th centuries. Readings and class discussions focus on definitions and techniques of literary genres, literary movements and historical events of Spain and Spanish America and the innovations and contributions of individual Spanish and Spanish-American writers. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 188 Asian-American Literature
     

    ENGL 188

    Asian-American Literature
    Using an interdisciplinary approach, students explore the wealth of Asian-American literature through required readings, multimedia materials and selected social, cultural and historical writings. Students engage in class discussions and critical writings to gain a better understanding of Asian-American literature. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 189 World Travel Narratives
     

    ENGL 189

    World Travel Narratives
    This course is a historical as well as theoretical survey of major and minor work, fictional or non-fictional, representing the authors' personal or cultural experience of the foreign. Starting from the Odyssey and covering some of the medieval narratives of peregrination (Marco Polo in Italy and Ibn Battuta in Morocco), the course concentrates on the 19th and 20th centuries. The travel narratives of these periods are analyzed within the context of colonialism (19th and the first part of the 20th century) as well as within the context of the phenomenon of tourism (roughly the second part of the 20th century). Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.

200 Level

  • BUSI 200 Financial Accounting
     

    BUSI 200

    Financial Accounting
    This course introduces students to basic accounting systems, concepts and principles. It is designed to provide essential experience for the understanding of the commercial world of art and design. Students in this course demonstrate the ability to record, summarize, report and interpret financial information in a conventional manner for presentation to stakeholders of a business. Students concentrate on financial accounting as a core business discipline and part of a well-rounded liberal education.  
  • ANTH 201 North American Indians
     

    ANTH 201

    North American Indians
    This course explores the rich culture, history and development of different native peoples from select regions of North America, from the arrival of ice-age hunter-gatherers, through European contact, to the present. Topics such as social structure, subsistence, settlement, religion, technology, architecture and art are examined from regional perspectives. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101.
  • MATH 201 Applied Mathematics
     

    MATH 201

    Applied Mathematics
    Students study, analyze and solve technical problems in structural design, using trigonometry, differential and integral calculus and the application of vectors. Prerequisite(s): MATH 101 or SAT math score of at least 560 or ACT math score of at least 24.
  • PHYS 201 Applied Physics
     

    PHYS 201

    Applied Physics
    This introductory level college physics course is geared toward a student studying a general education curriculum. It prepares students for future technology courses and covers select topics in the areas of mechanics, light, sound, thermodynamics and electricity. Prerequisite(s): MATH 201.
  • CHIN 202 Chinese II (Mandarin)
     

    CHIN 202

    Chinese II (Mandarin)
    This course allows students to learn and use additional vocabulary and structures and further understand social elements of the target language. Students in this course continue to learn about Chinese culture and history. Prerequisite(s): CHIN 101.
  • FREN 202 French II
     

    FREN 202

    French II
    This course allows students to learn and use additional vocabulary and structures, and further understand social elements of the target language. Students in this course continue to learn about French culture and history. Prerequisite(s): FREN 101.
  • PHIL 202 World Religions Course is available via eLearning
     

    PHIL 202

    World Religions
    Course is available via eLearning
    This course introduces students to the study of comparative religions with a focus on comparing and contrasting in a descriptive fashion the fundamental concepts and beliefs of the world’s major religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity. Historical roots of the religions are traced. Students are encouraged to be open-minded and ecumenical in their approaches to religious perspectives.
  • SPAN 202 Spanish II
     

    SPAN 202

    Spanish II
    This course allows students to learn and use additional vocabulary and structures and further understand social elements of the target language. Students in this course continue to learn about Latin American and Spanish culture and history. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 101.
  • COMM 205 Intercultural Communication
     

    COMM 205

    Intercultural Communication
    This course is designed to introduce students to the realities that cultural influences have on communication practices, patterns and outcomes; to heighten their awareness and appreciation of the various ways that cultural differences can influence the quality of human interactions; and to help them become more effective communicators in an ever increasing culturally pluralistic world. Prerequisite(s): COMM 105.
  • ENGL 212 British Literature Since 1920
     

    ENGL 212

    British Literature Since 1920
    This course emphasizes literature of Great Britain since 1920, focusing on writers of all genres generally associated with Modernism and Postmodernism. Students acquire knowledge about narrative techniques, especially those that have influenced storytelling today. Themes often employed by selected writers, such as colonialism, absurdism and pessimism, are discussed. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 215 Chinese Literature in Translation
     

    ENGL 215

    Chinese Literature in Translation
    The arrangement of the texts for this course, including poetry, short fiction and essays, provides students with a sense of literary development in China. Important historical and literary background is covered in lectures. Great importance is placed on class discussion and on creating a dialogue of interpretations about the texts. Students learn about the development of Chinese literature and a number of its important contemporary texts. They evaluate literary texts using critical thinking and reading and writing skills while also using these skills to create imitations of their own. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 235 Detective Narratives
     

    ENGL 235

    Detective Narratives
    This course focuses on the genre of the detective narrative and traces its history by examining important examples from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. Students read work by Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle, Raymond Chandler, Agatha Christie, Dashiell Hammett, Walter Mosley and Ed McBain, and study films, television and radio programs, comic books, graphic novels and games in order to develop a fuller understanding of fictional detectives and crime detection. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • MUSC 240 Music Composition
     

    MUSC 240

    Music Composition
    This course directly applies fundamental music theory skills towards musical composition. The course includes a variety of assignments and exercises to further develop written and aural musical skills, including aural ear training exercises, analysis of previously composed work and completion of short written composition exercises. Singing and/or instrumental experience is assumed as well as a strong interest in composition. Prerequisite(s): MUSC 140.
  • ENGL 242 The Absurdist Imagination
     

    ENGL 242

    The Absurdist Imagination
    This course explores the work of continental and expatriate writers and dramatists whose work challenges accepted conventions. Writers such as Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Franz Kafka, James Joyce, Albert Camus, Thomas Bernhard and Donald Barthelme—together with dramatists in the convention of the Theater of the Absurd (such as Eugene Ionesco, Luigi Pirandello, Samuel Beckett and Tom Stoppard)—are studied. Students are encouraged to make connections between artists of the written word and painters in the Dadaist and Surrealist traditions. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 207.
  • BUSI 250 Macroeconomics
     

    BUSI 250

    Macroeconomics
    The course introduces students to macroeconomics as a core discipline and part of a well-rounded liberal education. It is designed to provide essential experience for the understanding of the commercial world of art and to learn the discipline as a public policy tool. Students are expected to demonstrate insight into critical thinking in economic terms and to evaluate significant global events. Prerequisite(s): Any MATH course or SAT math score of at least 560 or ACT math score of at least 24.
  • BUSI 255 A Legal Survival Guide for Visual Artists and Designers
     

    BUSI 255

    A Legal Survival Guide for Visual Artists and Designers
    Through lectures, debates and exercises, students are introduced to Intellectual Property, contractual, tax and licensing issues as they relate to the creation, licensing and sale of the creative work produced by artists and designers. Students learn how to protect their creative work, avoid infringement actions, draft a contract for sale and licensing of creative work, and discover techniques to avoid legal disputes with clients.  
  • CREA 257 Poetry Writing II
     

    CREA 257

    Poetry Writing II
    This course provides an intense focus for students interested in publishing their poetry, offering techniques in expanding poetic voice and vision through workshops and revisions. Students organize and participate in public poetry readings. Prerequisite(s): CREA 157.
  • PSYC 260 Creative Thinking Theories and Processes
     

    PSYC 260

    Creative Thinking Theories and Processes
    Designed for students across all majors, this course provides students with an understanding of creative thinking as a psychological process and with skills for enhancing individual creative thinking and for promoting creative collaboration. Special attention is given to situational factors that either support or diminish creative thinking. Students examine their own creative thinking processes and that of other artists in their field.
  • CREA 262 Fiction Writing II
     

    CREA 262

    Fiction Writing II
    This course provides an intense focus for students interested in publishing their work, covering elements of fiction writing such as developing character, establishing tone and structuring plot. Students produce manuscripts for group readings. Prerequisite(s): CREA 162.
  • BUSI 265 Principles of Marketing
     

    BUSI 265

    Principles of Marketing
    This course emphasizes the role of marketing in creating value for customers, which leads to value for other stakeholders in a firm. The course covers such issues as value of products, customers and brands, methods for analyzing customers and competitors, customer segmentation, product positioning and the role of new technology. The course presents a general structure for analyzing marketing problems along with some specific quantitative tools, and provides students with a forum both for presenting and defending their own recommendations, and for critically examining and discussing the recommendations of others. Prerequisite(s): BUSI 101.
  • MUSC 270 Survey of Western Music I: Chant through Mozart
     

    MUSC 270

    Survey of Western Music I: Chant through Mozart
    The course builds upon the knowledge gained in music theory and its applications in analyzing Western music literature from antiquity through the Classical Era with special emphasis on issues of style, performance practice, musical aesthetics and cultural context as it relates to contemporary musical practices. Prerequisite(s): MUSC 140.
  • MUSC 271 Survey of Western Music II: Romantics to Contemporary
     

    MUSC 271

    Survey of Western Music II: Romantics to Contemporary
    The course is designed for all students pursuing careers in which music plays a vital role. The course provides a survey of Western music literature from the romantic era through the music of the 21st century with special emphasis on issues of style, performance practice, musical aesthetics and cultural context as they relate to contemporary musical practices. Prerequisite(s): MUSC 140.
  • ENGL 278 Angelheaded Hipsters: The Beat Writers
     

    ENGL 278

    Angelheaded Hipsters: The Beat Writers
    Students read and analyze the work of major Beat writers such as Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs, along with other significant contributors. In addition, students explore how the Beats integrated influences from the visual arts, Buddhism and jazz into their writings. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 280 Caribbean Literature in English
     

    ENGL 280

    Caribbean Literature in English
    This course introduces students to some of the major voices in the Caribbean literary canon written in English. Accessing multiple genres, students explore the various representations of Caribbean people and places in terms of ethnicity, race and gender and social, political and economic histories. The fiction, poetry, drama and creative nonfiction work of Caribbean writers enable students to experience the means by which writers from the Caribbean participate in shaping not only their worldview(s) but also the perceptions of those looking into the Caribbean space. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • PSYC 280 Psychology of Group Processes
     

    PSYC 280

    Psychology of Group Processes
    This course is an introduction to the psychology of group processes, dynamics and functions from a scientific and experiential/hands-on perspective. Topics include group formation, leadership, productivity, motivation, norms, roles, conflict management, problem-solving and decision making. Concepts are applied to a variety of groups, including work/business, athletic, social and educational groups. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101.
  • LIBA 288 Media Literacy Theory
     

    LIBA 288

    Media Literacy Theory
    Studies in media literacy theory focus on the relationships between media and other disciplines, tracing the technological, sociological and ideological development of media and media literacy, as well as analyzing aspects of diverse media, texts produced in diverse media and modes of reading media. Students read work by representative authors, including Theodore Adorno, Roland Barthes, Jean Baudrillard, Noam Chomksy, Michel Foucault, Paul Gilroy, Stuart Hall, bell hooks, Marshall McLuhan, WJT Mitchell, Laura Mulvey and Raymond Williams and respond through projects and essays. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.

300 Level

  • ENGL 300 Literary Autobiographies
     

    ENGL 300

    Literary Autobiographies
    Writers’ autobiographies reflect a broad range of backgrounds and reveal much about the creative process itself. Students can determine what social, political and cultural issues have either helped or hindered the creative process. Write-alike exercises enable students to construct their own autobiographies in a literary and authentic way. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • PHIL 301 Aesthetics Course is available via eLearning
     

    PHIL 301

    Aesthetics
    Course is available via eLearning
    This course introduces students to aesthetics as a branch of modern philosophy. Aesthetic investigation applies the basic analytical tools of philosophy to traditional concepts, arguments, and theories of beauty and art. The course addresses the issues of the difference between art and non-art, distinctions between good and bad art, the definition of beauty, the function of art and the main classical and contemporary theories of art. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH or ARTH course or any 200-level course from the Liberal Arts department.
  • ENGL 302 Greek and Roman Drama
     

    ENGL 302

    Greek and Roman Drama
    This course examines the culture of Ancient Greece with respect to the birth of Western drama. Selected tragedies and comedies are studied and analyzed. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • CHIN 303 Chinese III (Mandarin)
     

    CHIN 303

    Chinese III (Mandarin)
    This course builds on and further develops language skills learned in CHIN 202, specifically introducing vocabulary pertaining to art and architecture. Students taking this course acquire fundamental translation and interpretation skills of art-related topics and materials. Prerequisite(s): CHIN 202.
  • FREN 303 French III
     

    FREN 303

    French III
    This course builds on and further develops language skills learned in FREN 202, specifically introducing vocabulary pertaining art and architecture. Students taking this course acquire fundamental translation and interpretation skills of art related topics and materials. Prerequisite(s): FREN 202.
  • SPAN 303 Spanish III
     

    SPAN 303

    Spanish III
    This course builds on and further develops language skills learned in SPAN 202, specifically introducing vocabulary pertaining to art and architecture. Students acquire fundamental translation and interpretation skills of art related topics and materials. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 202.
  • ENGL 310 Modern European Drama 1870–1920
     

    ENGL 310

    Modern European Drama 1870–1920
    Students study the writers, work and aesthetic movements that shaped modern drama from 1870 to 1920. Writers and work are examined in their historical and cultural contexts, and their influences on subsequent drama are investigated. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • ENGL 340 History of Literary Theory and Criticism
     

    ENGL 340

    History of Literary Theory and Criticism
    Within an overview of the history of literary criticism from ancient Greece to the 21st century, students study major movements and theorists that have shaped various schools of criticism and the methods by which people read, understand and respond to literature and other texts. Representative movements and critical perspectives may include Poetics, Formalism, Marxism, Queer Studies, Psychoanalysis, Race and Ethnic Studies, New Historicism, Feminism, Reader-response, Postcolonialism, Structuralism, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies and Post-structuralism. To demonstrate their understanding of various critical theories, students apply theoretical models to the analysis of various texts. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 124, ENGL 145.
  • ANTH 350 Urban Ethnography
     

    ANTH 350

    Urban Ethnography
    There exists a growing body of interdisciplinary work that explores life in contemporary cities. This course addresses the broad dynamics of historical and contemporary urbanization in United States cities, addressing how phenomena like inequality, power, industrialism, the built landscape, post-industrialism, race, gender, suburbanization, consumerism, modernization and neo-liberalism both condition and are conditioned by urban life. There is special emphasis on the use of ethnographic analysis of Savannah to elucidate how these broad processes manifest themselves in everyday life. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101.
  • PHIL 350 Ethical Theories and Issues
     

    PHIL 350

    Ethical Theories and Issues
    This course is a philosophical study addressing contemporary moral problems including: world hunger, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, pornography and legalization of drugs. Students read the main ethical concepts of leading philosophers. The latter is applied to and juxtaposed with contrasting views from prominent thinkers on contemporary moral problems. The moral issues studied in this course constitute the substance of political and social debate of our times. While it is not the task of this course to promote any one particular viewpoint, students examine and assess their own views as well as the viewpoints of others with the hope of appreciating the depth and complexity of both the problems and the myriad possible solutions to them. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • BUSI 355 Entrepreneurship
     

    BUSI 355

    Entrepreneurship
    This course enables students to develop knowledge and skills in entrepreneurship. Financial management marketing strategies and business law are vital aspects of developing a business. This course provides a basis with which students may learn and develop knowledge and skills in these areas. Prerequisite(s): BUSI 265.
  • CREA 357 Poetry Writing III
     

    CREA 357

    Poetry Writing III
    Primarily for writing minors, this course helps advanced students prepare poetry for publication, providing advanced training in developing voice and focusing images through workshops and revisions. Students participate in public poetry readings. Prerequisite(s): CREA 257.
  • CREA 362 Fiction Writing III
     

    CREA 362

    Fiction Writing III
    Primarily for writing minors, this course helps students polish their work for publication, providing advanced training in techniques of fiction writing through workshops and revisions. Students produce work for a public forum. Prerequisite(s): CREA 262.
  • ENGL 363 Hardboiled: The Noir Literary Tradition
     

    ENGL 363

    Hardboiled: The Noir Literary Tradition
    Course readings focus on major writers who originated noir conventions such as the suspense-thriller plot, the femme fatale and the immobilized hero. Analyses of representative texts explore how the aesthetic arrangements of noir fiction engage contemporary social issues and offer incisive depictions of moral ambiguity, civic disorder and class conflict. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.

400 Level

  • ANTH 495 Special Topics in Anthropology
     

    ANTH 495

    Special Topics in Anthropology
    The selected topics of this course vary from quarter to quarter. The subject matter focuses on various topics in the anthropology field and allows the advanced student an opportunity to pursue individual or collaborative projects related to the subject of the course. Prerequisite(s): Vary according to topic.

700 Level

  • BIOL 700 Environmental Science and Sustainability
     

    BIOL 700

    Environmental Science and Sustainability
    This course provides an in-depth overview of science and scientific methodology as they relate to the field of environmental science. Through course readings and discussion, students evaluate a variety of environmental issues by integrating scientific, economic and political viewpoints. Students also evaluate potential sustainable solutions to environmental problems.
  • COMM 700 Intercultural Communication Course is available via eLearning
     

    COMM 700

    Intercultural Communication
    Course is available via eLearning
    This course provides a systematic examination of the multi-level communication dynamics that occur within intercultural community settings as well as an assessment of the theories and tools that can inform appropriate responses. Questions asked include but are not limited to: “What is intercultural communication?”, “How can it be analyzed?” and “What happens within an intercultural communication exchange?”
  • LIBA 700 Writing the Graduate Thesis
     

    LIBA 700

    Writing the Graduate Thesis
    Students taking this course are introduced to writing and research skills that prepare them for the written portion of a graduate thesis. Workshops and library sessions supplement course work in such topics as outlining, researching and conducting art and literature reviews, constructing an annotated bibliography and writing a thesis prospectus.
  • ANTH 701 Global Cultural Theory
     

    ANTH 701

    Global Cultural Theory
    A study of global cultural theory from structuralism to semiotics to postmodernism forms the foundation of this course. Major theoretical trends reflected in the writings of Marx, Saussure and Weber are analyzed as well as the work of thinkers such as Appadurai, Sennett, Foucault and Zizek.
  • BUSI 710 Principles of Financial Management and Marketing Course is available via eLearning
     

    BUSI 710

    Principles of Financial Management and Marketing
    Course is available via eLearning
    This course develops students’ ability to read, understand and use financial statements. Emphasis is placed on financial accounting data use and on the reconstruction and interpretation of economic events from published accounting reports. In addition, the course addresses the role of marketing in creating value for customers, which in turn leads to value for other stakeholders.
  • BUSI 720 Advanced Marketing
     

    BUSI 720

    Advanced Marketing
    Students in this course continue to gain knowledge of the marketing functions and foundations and to develop the ability to apply marketing concepts to specific business situations. They further their understanding of the relationship between marketing tactics as well as marketing strategy and decision-making. Prerequisite(s): BUSI 710.
  • BUSI 725 Financial and Managerial Accounting
     

    BUSI 725

    Financial and Managerial Accounting
    Students develop an advanced ability to understand how financial information is measured and communicated through financial statements. Emphasis is placed on learning to interpret and analyze financial accounting information and applying this data to evaluate business performance and inform decision-making.
  • BUSI 730 Global Macroeconomics of Business
     

    BUSI 730

    Global Macroeconomics of Business
    The global economy fluctuates in relation to open economies and gains from international trade agreements, monetary and fiscal policy, foreign exchange and exchange rate determinants and international capital flows. This course gives the graduate student an understanding of the economic and financial factors that influence international trade.
  • ENGL 730 Women's Writing and Rhetorical Discourse
     

    ENGL 730

    Women's Writing and Rhetorical Discourse
    Students critically analyze texts by and about women, surveying the field of women's rhetorical discourse concerning various intersections of race, faith, voice, gender roles, theory, health and work. Selected authors may include Paula Gunn Allen, Judith Butler, Hélène Cixous, bell hooks, Luce Irigaray, Trinh T. Minh-ha, Rosaura Sánchez, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Gertrude Stein and Virginia Woolf.
  • ENGL 733 History of Rhetoric Course is available via eLearning
     

    ENGL 733

    History of Rhetoric
    Course is available via eLearning
    Through close reading of selected writers, students investigate the history of rhetoric, exploring diverse definitions of rhetoric(s) and studying the theoretical practices in several contexts that include public and academic spaces. A sampling of rhetoricians could include Gloria Anzaldua, Aristotle, Mary Astell, James Berlin, Kenneth Burke, Edward P.J. Corbett, Jacques Derrida, Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza, Michel Foucault, Margaret Fuller, Susan Jarratt, Fredrich Nietzsche, Sojourner Truth, Giambattista Vico and Richard Weaver.
  • BUSI 735 Quantitative Methods and Analysis
     

    BUSI 735

    Quantitative Methods and Analysis
    Business decisions are not made only by high-powered executives. Artists and designers must make them every day as well. This course gives students an understanding of the role quantitative methods play in the decision-making process in business settings. Students learn about quantitative methods, how they work and how to apply and interpret them to make strong business decisions.
  • BUSI 760 Advanced Financial Management and Marketing
     

    BUSI 760

    Advanced Financial Management and Marketing
    Students are expected to analyze many of the important financial decisions made within firms and institutions. Some of the topics covered include the valuation of capital, investment proposals, capital and annual budgeting, cash flow projections and the choice of investment projects. The course also emphasizes qualitative and quantitative analyses. Prerequisite(s): BUSI 710.
  • BUSI 781 Global Marketing Management
     

    BUSI 781

    Global Marketing Management
    This course examines the specific issues involved in developing an international marketing strategy and in conducting marketing operations on an international as opposed to domestic scale. Attention is focused on problems such as identifying and evaluating opportunities in international markets, developing and adapting marketing tactics in relation to specific national market needs and constraints, and coordinating strategies in global markets. A strategic planning approach is adopted. Prerequisite(s): BUSI 720.