Cinema Studies

Courses

200 Level

  • CINE 205 Reading Films
     

    CINE 205

    Reading Films
    Students in this course learn the basic formal components of cinema (narrative, mise-en-scène, editing, cinematography, sound) and gain an understanding of how those elements are applied in narrative, documentary and experimental cinema. Students view a variety of landmark films and analyze them with an attention to the relationship between their formal and thematic components. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123.
  • CINE 275 History of Cinema
     

    CINE 275

    History of Cinema
    The development of the motion picture medium is examined through lectures, readings and screenings of landmark work. Students are expected to analyze film as an art form, a communications tool and an entertainment source. Technological developments and sociological influences are considered, as well as the present and future directions of the medium. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 123 or ENGL 124.  

300 Level

  • CINE 315 American Cinema
     

    CINE 315

    American Cinema
    Students examine in depth the development of the motion picture medium in America through lectures, readings and screenings of landmark work. Students are expected to analyze film as an art form, a communications tool and an entertainment source. Cultural and sociological influences are considered, as well as the present and future directions of American cinema. Prerequisite(s): CINE 275 or FILM 224.
  • CINE 320 Film Adaptation: From the Page to the Screen
     

    CINE 320

    Film Adaptation: From the Page to the Screen
    This course examines how film narratives differ from a novel's narrative. In particular, the course considers how the aspect of time shapes the construction of both narrative forms. Students explore how the camera reinterprets what the pen achieves. Students read, watch and compare great books that have been re-envisioned in filmic narratives. Prerequisite(s): Any ENGL course.
  • CINE 325 World Cinema
     

    CINE 325

    World Cinema
    Students examine the development of international cinema through lectures, readings and screenings of landmark work. The course considers some European cinema, with a primary focus on non-Western cinema. Students are introduced to a variety of topics that orient world cinema, including colonialism, globalization, censorship, nationalism and transnational production Students are expected to analyze film as an art form, a communications tool and an entertainment source. Prerequisite(s): CINE 275.

400 Level

  • CINE 415 The New Hollywood
     

    CINE 415

    The New Hollywood
    This interdisciplinary course makes a critical inquiry into the current workings of Hollywood, where it has been in the last 50 years, and how the culture of Hollywood has morphed into its present form. Prerequisite(s): CINE 205 or CINE 275.
  • CINE 495 Special Topics in Cinema Studies
     

    CINE 495

    Special Topics in Cinema Studies
    This elective course provides an opportunity for students to focus on particular issues in the field of cinema studies. Faculty, course content and prerequisites vary each time the course is offered. The course may include lectures, discussions, individual projects and critiques, depending on the nature of the topic. Prerequisite(s):

700 Level

  • CINE 703 Research Methodology in Cinema Studies
     

    CINE 703

    Research Methodology in Cinema Studies
    This course reviews the historical methods of research in cinema studies history, criticism and theory as a means to examine the changes taking place in the research methodologies and the writing of cinema studies scholarship as they are currently practiced. Prerequisite(s):
  • CINE 705 History of Cinema Course is available via eLearning
     

    CINE 705

    History of Cinema
    Course is available via eLearning
    This course offers an overview of the historical evolution of motion pictures, examining how movies help us understand the specific places and times in which they arose and illuminating the particular concerns of the people who made them. Prerequisite(s):
  • CINE 710 Critical Concepts in Cinema Studies: Narratology, Aesthetics and Auteurism
     

    CINE 710

    Critical Concepts in Cinema Studies: Narratology, Aesthetics and Auteurism
    This course examines issues of narratology (dramatic structure, story-telling strategies, issues concerning genre studies), aesthetics (film’s formal components such as mise-en-scene, editing, camera angles, framing, cinematography, sound) and auteurism (a more in-depth exploration of the idea of the director as the chief “author” of a film), and explores the interrelationships between these three concepts. Prerequisite(s):
  • CINE 715 American Cinema
     

    CINE 715

    American Cinema
    The development of the motion picture medium in America is examined through lectures, readings and screenings of landmark work. Students are expected to analyze film as an art form, a communications tool and an entertainment source. Cultural and sociological influences are considered, as well as the present and future directions of American cinema. Prerequisite(s):
  • CINE 720 Literary Films
     

    CINE 720

    Literary Films
    This course explores issues of adaptation, most notably how novels and short stories get converted into narrative feature films, with all the narrative, theoretical and aesthetic implications that come with such transformations. In addition to reading about and examining the problems that arise in adaptation, graduate students give two full in-class presentations on books or stories that have been adapted as feature films. Prerequisite(s):
  • CINE 725 World Cinema
     

    CINE 725

    World Cinema
    This course examines issues of world cinema while questioning the notion of “national cinema” and exploring the social, cultural, political, economic and aesthetic cross-pollinations that mark European and non-Western cinema. Students are expected to perform close-readings of landmark films and to analyze the significance of historical context. Prerequisite(s):
  • CINE 737 Graduate Seminar in Cinema Studies
     

    CINE 737

    Graduate Seminar in Cinema Studies
    This seminar includes studies of the cinematic trends of a particular decade. Topics range from international films, Hollywood movies and the various movements in cinema to the negotiation between the cultural, economic and theoretical difficulties of current transnational cinema. Prerequisite(s): CINE 705.
  • CINE 740 The New Hollywood
     

    CINE 740

    The New Hollywood
    In this interdisciplinary course, students make a critical inquiry into just how Hollywood works now, where it has been in the last 50 years and how the culture of Hollywood has morphed into its current form. Prerequisite(s):
  • CINE 747 Issues in Cinema Theory
     

    CINE 747

    Issues in Cinema Theory
    In this course, students evaluate critical and historical issues in cinema and related screen media; topics vary and may include national and ethnic cinema, directors, genres, historical movements and thematic studies. Prerequisite(s):
  • CINE 788 Cinema Studies M.A. Thesis
     

    CINE 788

    Cinema Studies M.A. Thesis
    Students in the M.A. program in cinema studies are required to complete a thesis demonstrating originality of work, knowledge of the history, theories and methods in the discipline. Students must have topic approval from a faculty adviser and work under the close supervision of a faculty committee. Prerequisite(s): Completion of the review for candidacy.