Architectural History

Courses

200 Level

  • ARLH 200 Reading and Writing in Architectural History
     

    ARLH 200

    Reading and Writing in Architectural History
    Writing is the cornerstone of the architectural historian's craft. Students in this course read and analyze selected writings about architecture, urbanism and the landscape as they develop their own writing skills. Emphasis is given to four aspects of architectural writing: description, analysis, interpretation and criticism. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 202 Architectural History in Savannah
     

    ARLH 202

    Architectural History in Savannah
    This course introduces students to the field of architectural history through the study of Savannah and the surrounding region. Lectures, discussions, guest speakers and numerous site visits and tours allow students to discover both the wide-ranging nature of the field and the defining historic characteristics of Savannah. Students explore different ways of reading the built environment through firsthand observation and the use of historical documents. Emphasis is placed on practical skills and an understanding of broad historical frameworks. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110.
  • ARLH 206 Modern Architecture I: 1750-1900
     

    ARLH 206

    Modern Architecture I: 1750-1900
    This course explores architecture, urbanism and architectural theory from 1750 to 1900. Issues such as Enlightenment philosophy, industrialization, urbanization, nationalism, revolution and technological innovation are considered as they bear on the theory and practice of architecture in a world that was rapidly modernizing. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 208 Modern Architecture II: 1900-Present
     

    ARLH 208

    Modern Architecture II: 1900-Present
    This course explores architecture, urbanism and architectural theory from 1900 to the present. Particular attention is given to concepts of modernity, modernism and modernization in an increasingly industrial, commercial and globalizing world. The course examines the work of celebrated architects and avant-garde movements, and it also investigates a variety of social, economic and environmental factors that have shaped architecture and architectural discourse. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 211 Survey of World Architecture and Urbanism
     

    ARLH 211

    Survey of World Architecture and Urbanism
    This course surveys the architecture and urbanism of China, Japan, Africa, India, the Muslim world, the South Pacific and the native cultures of the Americas from prehistory to the present. A comparative approach is used to illustrate how different cultural, religious and philosophical values and goals greatly affect built form. Emphasis is placed on the social and historical context of the sites discussed. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 212 Global Modernity in Architecture and Urbanism
     

    ARLH 212

    Global Modernity in Architecture and Urbanism
    The history of modernity as a global phenomenon has had an irrevocable impact on the built environment. Students explore building culture, architecture and urbanism within the context of an increasingly global world. Course materials cover how the development of cities and architecture around the world are influenced by transnational economic, environmental, cultural and political forces, including colonialism, industrialism, modernization, nationalism and regionalism. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 236 European Architecture: 1400-1750
     

    ARLH 236

    European Architecture: 1400-1750
    “Architecture aims at the eternal,” said Sir Christopher Wren. Renaissance architects pursued this goal through the vehicle of an ancient and uncannily compelling language of architecture known as the classical. This course examines the development of that language in buildings, designs, city plans and architectural theories from 15th-century Florence to 18th-century England. The social, political and religious contexts of Renaissance and Baroque architecture are given special consideration. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.

300 Level

  • ARLH 306 Reading Urban Form
     

    ARLH 306

    Reading Urban Form
    This course examines cities, the theaters in which history performs. The processes of building and rebuilding leave behind countless layers of evidence. Reading urban form is a key to understanding the real meaning of places. This course offers a hands-on exploration of transformations and continuities in urban design over two millennia from some of the richest examples in the world. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 307 American Architecture and Urbanism
     

    ARLH 307

    American Architecture and Urbanism
    This course examines North American architecture and urbanism from Colonial times to the present. Themes include domesticity, technology, commerce, politics, religion and institutional form. Special attention is given to such issues as the transmission and transformation of European influences, the development of regional patterns, and the emergence of uniquely American architectural and urban forms. Directed research is a significant part of the course. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 308 History of Urban Form
     

    ARLH 308

    History of Urban Form
    This course surveys urban form from its origins in ancient Mesopotamia to the controversies over contemporary urbanism, and also analyzes ideal cities. Architecture, public space, city planning and public works are considered in relation to the social, political, economic and religious context of the city. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 309 Villa and Garden
     

    ARLH 309

    Villa and Garden
    The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, the Alhambra, Versailles, Monticello and Falling Water all are products of a restless longing for a peaceful and contemplative life in the country, where art and nature coexist in ideal harmony. This course explores the architectural and social history of country houses, villas and gardens from antiquity to the 21st century. Special attention is given to garden literature, landscape theory, the rise of public parks and the development of suburbia. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 310 American Vernacular Architecture
     

    ARLH 310

    American Vernacular Architecture
    This course examines the history, characteristics and meaning of North American vernacular architecture, in particular the vast majority of the built domain that does not exemplify academic “high style” design. Topics include ethnic traditions in built form; the architecture of traditional American houses; agrarian, industrial and commercial buildings; the influence of the automobile on the built environment; and issues of vernacular landscape. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 311 The American City
     

    ARLH 311

    The American City
    Cities represent the greatest expression of the human desire to build, combining complex architectural and urbanistic systems.  Since colonial times, American cities have evolved away from the historic European models to define a distinct approach to urban form.  This course examines the evolution of American cities from the 17th century to the present, analyzing the significant historical forces that have shaped modern American urban environments.  Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ARTH course.
  • ARLH 321 Ancient Architecture in Context
     

    ARLH 321

    Ancient Architecture in Context
    The ancient Greeks and Romans developed a remarkable range of building types to accommodate their religious, political and social practices. This course approaches ancient Greek and Roman architecture by considering how the intended use of these structures related to architectural form, decoration and location. Particular emphasis is placed on the value of primary sources and archaeological material in enriching the understanding of built form during these eras. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 325 Islamic Art and Architecture
     

    ARLH 325

    Islamic Art and Architecture
    This course examines the evolution of art and architecture in the medieval Islamic world using a chronological and regional approach, ranging from the large unified empires of the Umayyads and Abbasids to the smaller successor states in Islamic Spain, sub-Saharan Africa and Mughal India. The course investigates the origins and nature of Islamic religion and culture and introduces students to the development of a unique Arab-Muslim civilization. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 336 Romanesque Art and Architecture
     

    ARLH 336

    Romanesque Art and Architecture
    This course surveys the art and architecture of the Romanesque period, from the 10th through the 12th centuries. The course focuses on the development of Romanesque architecture and monumental sculpture and also includes manuscript illumination and the “minor arts.” Emphasis is placed on the social context of the monument, as explored through selected readings from original sources. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 344 African Art and Architecture
     

    ARLH 344

    African Art and Architecture
    This course explores the indigenous art, architecture and cities of Africa, viewing the continent not as a region of cultural unity but as an interconnected territory with a long and varied history. The art and architecture begin in the ancient world with the development of urban civilizations in Egypt, Nubia, Kush and Aksum; continue into medieval times with the rise of kingdoms and trading empires in both East and West Africa; and continue into colonial times. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 350 The Architecture of the Classical Tradition
     

    ARLH 350

    The Architecture of the Classical Tradition
    The classical tradition has stood at the center of architectural practice and theory for more than two millennia. This course explores this tradition by tracing its evolution in history and considering its use in the contemporary world. Students study not only buildings, but also theoretical texts and related art forms. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ARTH course.
  • ARLH 355 Gothic Art and Architecture
     

    ARLH 355

    Gothic Art and Architecture
    This course surveys the art and architecture of the Gothic period, from the early 12th century to the late 14th century. The course focuses on the development of Gothic architecture, sculpture and stained glass and also encompasses manuscript illumination, metal work and ivory carving. Emphasis is placed on the social context of the monuments, as explored through selected readings from original sources. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 360 Architectural New York
     

    ARLH 360

    Architectural New York
    This course examines two distinct facets: surviving monuments that illustrate the revivalism of the 19th century and the development of the skyscraper during the 20th century, together with their various manifestations by important architects. Students record observations in journals and deliver on-site presentations in New York City. Final papers and/or projects are produced as statements of the discoveries and experiences of the students. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110.
  • ARLH 361 American Cultural Landscape
     

    ARLH 361

    American Cultural Landscape
    This lecture class addresses a variety of North American landscapes and how they link social groups and their spaces. Subjects include everyday homes, highways, factories, stores and recreation areas from the colonial era to the present. The guiding approach assumes that examining ordinary landscapes can help us understand the environmental experience and its significance for the majority of Americans. Prerequisite(s): ARLH 208 or ARTH 207.
  • ARLH 363 World Vernacular Architecture
     

    ARLH 363

    World Vernacular Architecture
    In this course, students explore vernacular architectural traditions from a global perspective through the broad-ranging, yet selective, study of specific cultures and regions. The course focuses primarily on domestic architecture and settlement forms but also addresses some vernacular religious and ceremonial structures. Through this course, students acquire an appreciation of the range of building traditions around the world, and explore the connection between architectural forms and the societies that created them. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110.
  • ARLH 375 Savannah: Architecture and Urban History
     

    ARLH 375

    Savannah: Architecture and Urban History
    Savannah is a rare American city that possesses a distinctive local identity, yet its evolution mirrors broader trends. This course examines the various historical forces that have shaped the city by investigating different urban and architectural topics in a roughly chronological sequence. Topics include the Savannah plan, religion, workers and slaves, charitable institutions, forts, industrialization, local house forms, suburbanization and the preservation movement. Prerequisite(s): ARLH 208 or ARTH 207.

400 Level

  • ARLH 401 Architectural Theory and Criticism
     

    ARLH 401

    Architectural Theory and Criticism
    This course explores how architects and theorists have attempted to conceptualize the essence of architecture. Through class readings (drawn from Vitruvius, Leon Alberti, John Ruskin, Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin and Le Corbusier, among others) and discussions, students encounter the varied kinds of critical thought that have been applied to the field of architecture throughout history. Prerequisite(s): ARLH 208.
  • ARLH 404 Power and the Built Environment
     

    ARLH 404

    Power and the Built Environment
    This course explores the many ways that social, political and economic power relations have shaped the built environment and the human experience of it throughout history. The embodiment of power is examined within a range of scales, building types and social contexts, including urban design, public institutions, commemorative monuments and corporate buildings. Extensive readings, class discussions and presentations challenge students to develop critical thinking and communication skills. Prerequisite(s): ARLH 208 or ARTH 207.
  • ARLH 408 Monastic Architecture of the Western World
     

    ARLH 408

    Monastic Architecture of the Western World
    This seminar explores the history and development of monastic architecture in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the transference and assimilation of European traditions in the New World up to the present. The course focuses on architecture from a contextual standpoint, addressing historical, theological and socio-economic issues, and also from a practical standpoint, addressing building techniques and materials, as well as site considerations such as topography and climate. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 110, ENGL 123.
  • ARLH 450 Research Methods in Architectural History
     

    ARLH 450

    Research Methods in Architectural History
    This hands-on course introduces students to a wide range of research resources and the problems they pose. Emphasis is placed on differing manifestations of each type of historical documentation and how each type has evolved over time. Students examine forms of documentation including textual accounts, maps, architectural drawings, measurement systems, models, photographs, terminology, legal documents such as censuses and tax records, and oral history. Prerequisite(s): ARTH 207 or ARLH 208.
  • ARLH 455 History of Gender and the Built Environment
     

    ARLH 455

    History of Gender and the Built Environment
    Built environments help construct, maintain and even destroy many aspects of human identity, including gender. This seminar course examines how issues of gender have shaped built environments in the West from early historical times to the present.  It focuses primarily on the manner in which architecture and space have contributed to social, cultural and political relations predicated on gender.  This course challenges students to strengthen their research, critical thinking and leadership skills. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level ARLH/ARTH course.
  • ARLH 495 Special Topics in Architectural History
     

    ARLH 495

    Special Topics in Architectural History
    The selected topics of this course vary from quarter to quarter. Each seminar focuses on various issues in the field of architectural history and offers the student an opportunity to pursue individual research projects related to the subject of the course. Prerequisite(s): Vary according to topic.
  • ARLH 499 Architectural History B.F.A. Thesis
     

    ARLH 499

    Architectural History B.F.A. Thesis
    This course provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate sound scholarly methodology and critical thinking skills as they select a topic, research it and write an advanced research paper under the supervision of a faculty committee. The topic for the thesis must be approved in advance by a faculty adviser. The course is designed for senior architectural history majors. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

500 Level

  • ARLH 501 History of Modern Architecture 1
     

    ARLH 501

    History of Modern Architecture
    1
    This course traces the evolution of modern architectural design from the mid-18th century to the present, addressing major works of architecture, urban design, landscape design and architectural theory.  Attention is given to the emergence of new building typologies, the phases of historicism, the impact of new technology and materials, and the changing concepts of modernity.
  • ARLH 510 Architecture of World Cultures
     

    ARLH 510

    Architecture of World Cultures
    Throughout the world, architecture and cities stand as the most visible expressions of global cultures.  By focusing on representative work, this course analyzes the impact of various influences that shape the built environment in diverse non-Western societies in Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas.

700 Level

  • ARLH 700 Research Methods in Architectural History
     

    ARLH 700

    Research Methods in Architectural History
    This course introduces students to a wide range of research resources and the issues they seek to address. Particular attention is given to differing manifestations of each type of historical documentation and how that type has evolved over time. Textual accounts, maps and charts, architectural drawings, measurement systems, models, photographs, legal documents such as censuses, tax records and oral history are among the forms of documentation examined. As much as possible, attention is given to actual documents through discussions and field workshops in libraries and archives.
  • ARLH 705 Architectural History Methodology and Historiography
     

    ARLH 705

    Architectural History Methodology and Historiography
    Students in this course are introduced to methods of research and analysis and to key texts that have shaped the discipline of architectural history over time. Specific topics addressed include the nature of history, the nature of architectural history, style, formal analysis, iconography and symbolism, and a variety of approaches embracing technological, political, economic and social aspects of the built environment.
  • ARLH 709 Architectural Theory and Criticism
     

    ARLH 709

    Architectural Theory and Criticism
    This seminar examines how architects and theorists have attempted to conceptualize the essence of architecture. Class readings are drawn from significant work in the history of architecture, among them treatises by Vitruvius, Alberti, Ruskin, Pugin and Le Corbusier. Through discussion, research papers, lectures and analysis, students acquire a familiarity with the critical tradition as well as skills in analyzing and conceptualizing architectural principles.
  • ARLH 724 Ancient Architecture in Context
     

    ARLH 724

    Ancient Architecture in Context
    The ancient Greeks and Romans developed a remarkable range of building types to accommodate their religious, political and social practices. This course approaches ancient Greek and Roman architecture by considering how the intended use of these structures related to architectural form, decoration and location, and stresses, in particular, the value of primary sources and archaeological material in enriching the understanding of the built form during these eras.
  • ARLH 726 Gothic Art and Architecture
     

    ARLH 726

    Gothic Art and Architecture
    This course covers the Gothic period, from the early 12th century to the later 13th century. The course focuses on the development of Gothic architecture, sculpture and stained glass and also encompasses manuscript illumination, metal work and ivory carving. The social context of the monuments is explored through selected readings from original sources.
  • ARLH 728 Romanesque Art and Architecture
     

    ARLH 728

    Romanesque Art and Architecture
    This course surveys art and architecture of the Romanesque period, from the 10th century to the 12th century. The course focuses on the development of Romanesque architecture and monumental sculpture and also includes manuscript illumination and the “minor arts.” The social context of the monuments is explored through selected readings from original sources.
  • ARLH 739 History of Urban Form
     

    ARLH 739

    History of Urban Form
    This course surveys urban form from its origins in ancient Mesopotamia to the controversies over contemporary urbanism. It also includes analysis of ideal cities. Architecture, public space, city planning and public works are considered in relation to the social, political, economic and religious context of urban form. Graduate students are expected to actively participate in group discussion and develop their critical thinking skills through independent research projects.
  • ARLH 741 The American City
     

    ARLH 741

    The American City
    Cities represent the greatest expression of the human desire to build, combining complex architectural and urbanistic systems. Since colonial times, American cities have evolved away from the historic European models to define a distinct approach to urban form. This course examines the evolution of American cities from the 17th century to the present, analyzing the significant historical forces that shaped modern American urban environments. Graduate students are challenged to develop their advanced research, critical thinking and leadership skills.
  • ARLH 742 Monastic Architecture of the Western World
     

    ARLH 742

    Monastic Architecture of the Western World
    This course explores the history and development of monastic architecture in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the transference and assimilation of European traditions in the New World up to the present. This course explores architecture from a contextual standpoint, addressing historical, theological and socio-economic issues, as well as, from a practical standpoint, addressing building techniques and materials, and site considerations such as topography and climate.
  • ARLH 743 Islamic Art and Architecture
     

    ARLH 743

    Islamic Art and Architecture
    This course examines the evolution of art and architecture in the medieval Islamic world using a chronological and regional approach, ranging from the large unified empires of the Umayyads and Abbasids to the smaller successor states in Islamic Spain, sub-Saharan Africa and Mughal India. The course investigates the origins and nature of Islamic religion and culture and introduces students to the development of a unique Arab-Muslim civilization.
  • ARLH 744 African Art and Architecture
     

    ARLH 744

    African Art and Architecture
    This course explores the indigenous art, architecture and cities of Africa, following a chronological and regional approach, which introduces the geography, cultures and history of the African continent as a whole. The goal is to consider Africa not as a region of cultural unity, but rather as an interconnected territory with a long and varied history that has given birth to a variety of creative expressions and artistic achievements. These expressions and achievements begin in the ancient world with the development of urban civilizations in Egypt, Nubia, Kush and Aksum; continue into medieval times with the rise of kingdoms and trading empires in both East and West Africa; and continue into colonial times.
  • ARLH 745 American Vernacular Architecture
     

    ARLH 745

    American Vernacular Architecture
    This course examines the history, characteristics and meaning of vernacular architecture, the 95 percent of the built domain not exemplifying academic “high style” design. Topics include ethnic traditions in built form; the architecture of traditional American houses, agrarian, industrial and commercial buildings; the influence of the automobile on the built environment; and issues of vernacular landscape.
  • ARLH 750 The Classical Language of Architecture
     

    ARLH 750

    The Classical Language of Architecture
    Classical architecture is a pervasive yet elusive subject of study. This course investigates classicism in architecture as idea, language and tradition. Classical architecture is studied in the light of classical liberal arts tradition by examining texts, buildings, cities, landscapes and allied arts from the ancient world to the present.
  • ARLH 755 History of Gender and the Built Environment
     

    ARLH 755

    History of Gender and the Built Environment
    Built environments help construct, maintain and even destroy many aspects of human identity, including gender. This seminar course examines how issues of gender have shaped built environments in the West from early historical times to the present. It focuses primarily on the manner in which architecture and space have contributed to social, cultural and political relations predicated on gender. This course challenges graduate students to strengthen their research, critical thinking and leadership skills.
  • ARLH 756 American Fortified Architecture
     

    ARLH 756

    American Fortified Architecture
    This seminar course explores the history, theory and technology of American fortified architecture from the colonial period to the early 20th century, as well as the present-day interpretation and use of fortifications as historic sites. Emphasis is placed on coastal fortifications. Students are required to travel to fortified sites in the area for independent research.
  • ARLH 757 The Islamic City
     

    ARLH 757

    The Islamic City
    This course focuses on the development, morphology and institutions of the Islamic city as a unique urban phenomenon within the medieval world, exploring the connection between the religion of Islam and the creation of fundamental urban planning principles found throughout the Islamic world. The course explores the relationship of regionalism and local cultural influences on the development of specific building types and forms, from Islamic Spain to India to sub-Saharan Africa.
  • ARLH 758 Villa and Garden
     

    ARLH 758

    Villa and Garden
    The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, the Alhambra, Versailles, Monticello and Falling Water are all products of a restless longing for a peaceful and contemplative life in the country where art and nature coexist in ideal harmony. This course explores the architectural and social history of country houses, villas and gardens from antiquity to the 20th century. Special attention is given to garden literature, landscape theory, the rise of public parks and the development of suburbia.
  • ARLH 759 Power and the Built Environment
     

    ARLH 759

    Power and the Built Environment
    This seminar explores the many ways that social, political and economic powers have shaped the built environment and the experience of it throughout history. The embodiment of power is examined within a range of scales, building types and social contexts including urban design, public institutions, commemorative monuments and corporate buildings. Extensive readings, class discussions and presentations challenge students to develop their own critical thinking and communication skills.
  • ARLH 763 World Vernacular Architecture
     

    ARLH 763

    World Vernacular Architecture
    Students explore vernacular architectural traditions from a global perspective as a broad-ranging, yet selective study of specific cultures and regions. The primary focus of the course is on domestic architecture and settlement forms, and also includes some vernacular religious and ceremonial structures. Through this course, students acquire an appreciation of the range of building traditions found around the world, and explore the connection between vernacular architectural forms and the societies that created them.
  • ARLH 770 Documenting and Interpreting the Built Environment
     

    ARLH 770

    Documenting and Interpreting the Built Environment
    Students participate in on-location study of the built environment, investigating historical processes in their physical context. Through a synthesis of analysis, critique, research and field study, students explore urban form, landscapes and building culture from historical, theoretical, aesthetic and practical points of view.
  • ARLH 775 Savannah: Architecture and Urban History
     

    ARLH 775

    Savannah: Architecture and Urban History
    Savannah is a rare American city that possesses a distinctive local identity, yet its evolution mirrors broader trends. This course examines the various historical forces that have shaped the city by investigating different urban and architectural topics in a roughly chronological sequence. Topics include the Savannah Plan, religion, workers and slaves, charitable institutions, forts, industrialization, local house forms, suburbanization, and the preservation movement. This course offers graduate students an opportunity to conduct advanced research using primary documents and to present findings in a formal oral presentation.
  • ARLH 779F Graduate Field Internship
     

    ARLH 779F

    Graduate Field Internship
    Students in this course undertake a field assignment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good academic standing.
  • ARLH 779T Graduate Teaching Internship
     

    ARLH 779T

    Graduate Teaching Internship
    Students in this course undertake a teaching assignment under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite(s): 15 graduate credit hours, good academic standing.
  • ARLH 780 Special Topics in Architectural History
     

    ARLH 780

    Special Topics in Architectural History
    The topic of this course varies from quarter to quarter. Each seminar focuses on various issues in the field of architectural history.
  • ARLH 788 Architectural History M.A. Thesis
     

    ARLH 788

    Architectural History M.A. Thesis
    Students enrolled in the architectural history M.A. program are required to complete a thesis demonstrating knowledge of the methods and theories in the discipline. Students must have topic approval from a faculty adviser and work under the close supervision of a faculty committee. Prerequisite(s): Completion of the review for candidacy.
  • ARLH 790 Architectural History M.F.A. Thesis
     

    ARLH 790

    Architectural History M.F.A. Thesis
    Architectural history graduate students are required to complete a thesis and produce an in-depth research paper. Strong methodological skills, original ideas and thorough research are emphasized. Students must have topic approval from a faculty adviser and work under the close supervision of a faculty committee. Prerequisite(s): Completion of the review for candidacy.